Official OPPO UDP-203 Owner's Thread - Page 1261 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #37801 of 37901 Old 01-10-2020, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by sbarnhar View Post
How would you say these 3 compare for handling upscaling and noise in DVDs (not bluray), especially with older, average transfers? I have read some reviews saying the 820 does better than the 203 for this use. I want to upgrade to a 4K TV soon, so this will be an important use case for me.

Thanks!

You may also want to factor in how well your upcoming tv does that up scaling. Some tvs do a very good job with up scaling, but of course you're going to pay for that processing ability. In the end, you could have either the player or the tv do it, which ever is better.
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post #37802 of 37901 Old 01-10-2020, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by sbarnhar View Post
How would you say these 3 compare for handling upscaling and noise in DVDs (not bluray), especially with older, average transfers? I have read some reviews saying the 820 does better than the 203 for this use. I want to upgrade to a 4K TV soon, so this will be an important use case for me.

Thanks!
Both the Panasonic DP-UB820 and 9000 share the same video processing engine. So both of them would give the same identical results. Between the Panasonic and Oppo, I’d honestly have to conclude that they are more alike than they are different and call it a draw. Either will give you all of the processing tools you’ll need to make a 480p DVD look the best it can possibly look when upscaled to 4K.

Putting perceived ruggedness and durability aside, the DP-UP820 will equal the video performance of the 9000 or the UDP-203 (using current used market asking prices) for half the cost. But if you can find a used 203 in excellent condition for the same price as a new 820, that would be my personal choice and recommendation. Otherwise, the 820 is a no brainer.

Hope this helps...
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post #37803 of 37901 Old 01-11-2020, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Foundation42 View Post
You may also want to factor in how well your upcoming tv does that up scaling. Some tvs do a very good job with up scaling, but of course you're going to pay for that processing ability. In the end, you could have either the player or the tv do it, which ever is better.
Does the Pana have Source Direct? To be able to try and see if the display upscaling is better or worse...?

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post #37804 of 37901 Old 01-11-2020, 10:16 AM
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Does the Pana have Source Direct? To be able to try and see if the display upscaling is better or worse...?
No, it does not. It will upscale or downscale to whatever output resolution you have selected in the video settings.

If you want to test 1080P output for 1080P content, you would need to set output resolution to 1080P.
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post #37805 of 37901 Old 01-11-2020, 04:16 PM
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It fell down

Here's what happened. I was doing some re-wiring and temporarily placed my 203 on top of my speaker which has a flat surface. I accidentally triggered my drop down screen and as it descended, it hit the corner of the player knocking it to the ground (from 42" height to carpeted floor). I quickly picked it up and brushed it off and blew on it (I don't know why). It appear undamaged. I plugged it in, fired it up and hoped for the best. All seemed ok. Then I noticed that the Ethernet cable wouldn't click into place. It goes in and connects but very easily pulls out. I consider myself lucky (and stupid).

Questions:

- Would most of you just live with the Ethernet jack like that or send it in for repair? And where to?

- if it is playing ok is it likely ok? That is, part of me wants it checked out to ensure it is 100%. Is there some kind of test I could run?

- the only "symptom" seems to be that when I try to play a regular DVD, the picture turns on and off and sounds cuts out. I then have to enter setup (not easily with picture going in and out) and switch from Auto everything to Source Direct and custom 480p output, which gets it working again. But this may be entirely unrelated and a known issue. I've now set up my 103 with Darbee for playing non-UHD discs. I forgot how much I liked 1080p Blu-rays with Darbee.

Last edited by console; 01-11-2020 at 04:22 PM.
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post #37806 of 37901 Old 01-11-2020, 04:23 PM
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Then I noticed that the Ethernet cable wouldn't click into place. It goes in and connects but very easily pulls out.
Your cable end connector could be damaged. Try another cable to see if it will latch into the 203.
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post #37807 of 37901 Old 01-11-2020, 04:28 PM
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Your cable end connector could be damaged. Try another cable to see if it will latch into the 203.
Thanks. Tried that. It's the Ethernet port itself.
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post #37808 of 37901 Old 01-11-2020, 08:30 PM
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And where to?
Oppo repair service.
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post #37809 of 37901 Old 01-11-2020, 10:50 PM
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Regular DVDs are not 480p but are 480i, like analog television was.

Some digital displays or receivers can't handle interlaced input and need to be sent progressive scan. That has nothing to do with the physical damage to your ethernet jack - it is normal behavior if you have such a display or receiver.

You would likely have a similar problem with Blu-rays that were shot using 1080i cameras (there are a lot of live concert disks like that), and you would need to force the output to 1080p or 2160p to get them to play on your equipment.

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post #37810 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 02:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Philnick View Post
Regular DVDs are not 480p but are 480i, like analog television was....
For the sake of accuracy...

With regard to 'movie' DVD's, the vast majority are encoded with progressive video frames. However, the MPEG-2 video stream is 'flagged' as being interlaced

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post #37811 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 07:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philnick View Post
Regular DVDs are not 480p but are 480i, like analog television was....
For the sake of accuracy...

With regard to 'movie' DVD's, the vast majority are encoded with progressive video frames. However, the MPEG-2 video stream is 'flagged' as being interlaced [IMG class=inlineimg]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/IMG]
Given that
1) the "progressive scan" DVD players competed on the quality of their deinterlacing (read up on "3:2 pull-down" and cadence reading versus flag reading deinterlacing), and
2) the Oppos' conversion of DVDs to 24p is switchable because it shouldn't be used on non-movie material,
I believe you are mistaken. The DVD standard was developed in the days of analog 480i television. Blu-rays can be encoded with progressive scan but DVDs cannot.
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post #37812 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 10:47 AM
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I believe you are mistaken. The DVD standard was developed in the days of analog 480i television. Blu-rays can be encoded with progressive scan but DVDs cannot.
I am not wrong...

In the case of most NTSC movie DVD's, if you extract the MPEG-2 video stream out of the DVD's VOB container, it's quite a simple task to remove the 3:2 pull-down flag from the MPEG-2 video stream and re-flag it as progressive. Which in-turn reveals the 'progressive' encoded frames!

I have however, mentioned a few times (within various OPPO topics on various forums) that the OPPO players do not always process the re-flagged video streams correctly, especially if the MPEG-2 video stream is muxed within the .mkv container.


Cheers
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post #37813 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 11:23 AM
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Official OPPO UDP-203 Owner's Thread

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Originally Posted by SeeMoreDigital View Post
I am not wrong...



In the case of most NTSC movie DVD's, if you extract the MPEG-2 video stream out of the DVD's VOB container, it's quite a simple task to remove the 3:2 pull-down flag from the MPEG-2 video stream and re-flag it as progressive. Which in-turn reveals the 'progressive' encoded frames!



I have however, mentioned a few times (within various OPPO topics on various forums) that the OPPO players do not always process the re-flagged video streams correctly, especially if the MPEG-2 video stream is muxed within the .mkv container.





Cheers

I agree with SeeMoreDigital.

I have done a bit of re encoding my Mpeg2 dvds back in the day . The region 1 film DVDs , 99% were progressive scan. I still have the collection , ask me about any of the well known films of that time and I can tell you if it was progressive or interlaced . I’ve seen some European r2 DVDs that were interlaced as well as some TV programs. There was a visible quality difference between progressive encodes and interlaced .

Technically to re-encode a progressive dvd you needed to do inverse telecine aka IVTC to remove the flag. The quality in this case was very good. And to re-encode an interlaced dvd you needed to do de-interlace and IVTC. It would not always result in a great Re-encode with de-interlaced material.

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Last edited by thomasphoenix; 01-12-2020 at 11:30 AM.
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post #37814 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 05:42 PM
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^ The DVD data on disc is Fields (half frames). The flagging indicates whether successive Fields were scanned at the same time — as from a single frame of film (progressive) or separated in time — as from an interlacing TV camera (interlaced). Reconstructing the full frame, particularly with regard to color up sampling, is different depending on how the data was captured due to the motion blur built into the interlaced method. But the upshot is the data coming off the disc is half frames — Fields — 480i data stream with the paired Fields differing in meaning based on the original capture method.

DVD is inherently a Field based media format, as was necessary to keep costs down and maximize TV compatibility when it launched.
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post #37815 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 05:58 PM
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^ The DVD data on disc is Fields (half frames). The flagging indicates whether successive Fields were scanned at the same time — as from a single frame of film (progressive) or separated in time — as from an interlacing TV camera (interlaced). Reconstructing the full frame, particularly with regard to color up sampling, is different depending on how the data was captured due to the motion blur built into the interlaced method. But the upshot is the data coming off the disc is half frames — Fields — 480i data stream with the paired Fields differing in meaning based on the original capture method.



DVD is inherently a Field based media format, as was necessary to keep costs down and maximize TV compatibility when it launched.

—Bob


I am pretty sure about this. There were DVD's authored from film source. Hence the original 24 frames were converted and stored at 23.976, had 3:2 pull down applied, this could be easily reconstructed with IVTC. Most DVD's I own fall into this category. And there were DVD's authored from interlaced video source of a film and it was tough to recover the frames.

I do find conflicting information on the web about whether the interlacing was done by the player or was already there in the disc. Hence it's easy to be confused.

But my own amateur authoring experience is that I could encode at 23.976 without interlacing.
It was the player that interlaced for standard av output. Whereas a progressive player would deliver the 23.976 through component video.

My understanding is it was definitely possible to encode 23.976 in an mpeg2 stream without interlacing it and that was how most good film transfers were done not to mention it did save space and was higher quality because of being less frames than pulled down 30hz.

Most displays were of course interlaced. I happened to have a progressive one ( 120hz) and a faroudja chip DVD player.

I would defer to someone who's worked in professional dvd & Blu-ray authoring. My findings were purely from backing up my personal collection by myself. And the related research done to back it up in original frame rate.

one of the many reference materials about non interlaced film authoring https://www.dvfilm.com/maker/24Pdvd.htm

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Last edited by thomasphoenix; 01-12-2020 at 07:00 PM.
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post #37816 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 10:13 PM
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Bob Pariseau is correct. The fields of which he speaks are the traditional even or odd scan line images used by analog NTSC 480i television, which painted the image by alternating between lighting up the even and odd scan lines 60 times a second, using the alternating line current as a cheap synch signal.

The idea that DVD players take progressive disks and then interlace them for output is precisely backwards.

The disks are authored as 480i with alternating even or odd scan line images. Only the more expensive players labeled as "progressive scan" players even attempted to output 480p.

DVDs coming from interlaced cameras should not be converted to progressive scan, as that can produce images with the even and odd lines coming from different points in time, which could create jagged "comb" like vertical lines on the edges of objects in motion or camera pans.

For DVDs coming from 24 frame per second movie source, a different problem obtained: TV used 60 odd or even fields per second - which amounted to 30 frames per second. Early telecine conversions, scanning 24 frame per second film at, in effect, 30 frames per second, led to speeded up motion, which was not acceptable.

To avoid this, the practice of simply doing a 1:1 scan was replaced by the practice of repeating occasional fields in a predictable pattern, so that at the end of about 10 frames it came out even. That was what became known as 3:2 pulldown.

Inexpensive DVD players just output this as it was encoded - and televised - as 480i, and we've become used to what that looks like, as the distortions are subtle distortions of time, not visible distortions of geometry.

To promote deinterlacing of film-sourced mateiral, however, a flag was inserted into the data stream to mark the beginning or each instance of the characteristic pattern.

The less-expensive progressive scan DVD players would rely on those flags to figure out which fields went together to make the same frame of film. Those were the "flag-reader" players.

However, in the course of editing the masters, often on videotape, these patterns could get mangled, so more sophisticated players, using computer chips from companies like Farjouda, compared the actual fields to find which fields were exact duplicates, in order to determine where they were in the pattern. Those became known as "cadence readers."

I suppose that nothing would stop someone from burning a DVD wth progressive info on them, but those are not standard NTSC disks designed for wide compatabiity - and the idea that cheap DVD players include circuitry to take progressive information and interlace it for compatibility with older TVs is upside down.

All standard NTSC DVDs are 480i, and the better players can deinterlace film-sourced disks for output - but for material captured using older interlaced video cameras, the signal should not be deinterlaced, as the comb effects and distortion of motion is not something that we've become inured to. That's why the 24p deinterlacing setting for DVDs is optional on Oppos, and the advice is to leave it off unless you're certain that the source is not video but film,

The exception to this is if you have a digital display or AVR that finds interlaced video indigestible, in which case you have to set your equipment to force progressive output and live with the resulting "comb" effects.

Phil

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post #37817 of 37901 Old 01-12-2020, 10:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philnick View Post
Bob Pariseau is correct. The fields of which he speaks are the traditional even or odd scan line images used by analog NTSC 480i television, which painted the image by alternating between lighting up the even and odd scan lines 60 times a second, using the alternating line current as a cheap synch signal.

The idea that DVD players take progressive disks and then interlace them for output is precisely backwards.

The disks are authored as 480i with alternating even or odd scan line images. Only the more expensive players labeled as "progressive scan" players even attempted to output 480p.

DVDs coming from interlaced cameras should not be converted to progressive scan, as that can produce images with the even and odd lines coming from different points in time, which could create jagged "comb" like vertical lines on the edges of objects in motion or camera pans.

For DVDs coming from 24 frame per second movie source, a different problem obtained: TV used 60 odd or even fields per second - which amounted to 30 frames per second. Early telecine conversions, scanning 24 frame per second film at, in effect, 30 frames per second, led to speeded up motion, which was not acceptable.

To avoid this, the practice of simply doing a 1:1 scan was replaced by the practice of repeating occasional fields in a predictable pattern, so that at the end of about 10 frames it came out even. That was what became known as 3:2 pulldown.

Inexpensive DVD players just output this as it was encoded - and televised - as 480i, and we've become used to what that looks like, as the distortions are subtle distortions of time, not visible distortions of geometry.

To promote deinterlacing of film-sourced mateiral, however, a flag was inserted into the data stream to mark the beginning or each instance of the characteristic pattern.

The less-expensive progressive scan DVD players would rely on those flags to figure out which fields went together to make the same frame of film. Those were the "flag-reader" players.

However, in the course of editing the masters, often on videotape, these patterns could get mangled, so more sophisticated players, using computer chips from companies like Farjouda, compared the actual fields to find which fields were exact duplicates, in order to determine where they were in the pattern. Those became known as "cadence readers."

I suppose that nothing would stop someone from burning a DVD wth progressive info on them, but those are not standard NTSC disks designed for wide compatabiity - and the idea that cheap DVD players include circuitry to take progressive information and interlace it for compatibility with older TVs is upside down.

All standard NTSC DVDs are 480i, and the better players can deinterlace film-sourced disks for output - but for material captured using older interlaced video cameras, the signal should not be deinterlaced, as the comb effects and distortion of motion is not something that we've become inured to. That's why the 24p deinterlacing setting for DVDs is optional on Oppos, and the advice is to leave it off unless you're certain that the source is not video but film,

The exception to this is if you have a digital display or AVR that finds interlaced video indigestible, in which case you have to set your equipment to force progressive output and live with the resulting "comb" effects.


I am aware of fields and 2:2 and 3:2 pull down + 50hz and 60hz interlaced displays.
Like I said there is plenty of conflicting information around so I have only one question. Have you authored Dvds and or Blu rays? If so I shall defer to your experience since I'm not a professional.

I don't want to derail this thread anymore. Let's take this offline in messages with further discussion. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.

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Last edited by thomasphoenix; 01-12-2020 at 11:14 PM.
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post #37818 of 37901 Old 01-13-2020, 12:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philnick View Post
Bob Pariseau is correct. The fields of which he speaks are the traditional even or odd scan line images used by analog NTSC 480i television, which painted the image by alternating between lighting up the even and odd scan lines 60 times a second, using the alternating line current as a cheap synch signal.

The idea that DVD players take progressive disks and then interlace them for output is precisely backwards.

The disks are authored as 480i with alternating even or odd scan line images. Only the more expensive players labeled as "progressive scan" players even attempted to output 480p.

DVDs coming from interlaced cameras should not be converted to progressive scan, as that can produce images with the even and odd lines coming from different points in time, which could create jagged "comb" like vertical lines on the edges of objects in motion or camera pans.

For DVDs coming from 24 frame per second movie source, a different problem obtained: TV used 60 odd or even fields per second - which amounted to 30 frames per second. Early telecine conversions, scanning 24 frame per second film at, in effect, 30 frames per second, led to speeded up motion, which was not acceptable.

To avoid this, the practice of simply doing a 1:1 scan was replaced by the practice of repeating occasional fields in a predictable pattern, so that at the end of about 10 frames it came out even. That was what became known as 3:2 pulldown.

Inexpensive DVD players just output this as it was encoded - and televised - as 480i, and we've become used to what that looks like, as the distortions are subtle distortions of time, not visible distortions of geometry.

To promote deinterlacing of film-sourced mateiral, however, a flag was inserted into the data stream to mark the beginning or each instance of the characteristic pattern.

The less-expensive progressive scan DVD players would rely on those flags to figure out which fields went together to make the same frame of film. Those were the "flag-reader" players.

However, in the course of editing the masters, often on videotape, these patterns could get mangled, so more sophisticated players, using computer chips from companies like Farjouda, compared the actual fields to find which fields were exact duplicates, in order to determine where they were in the pattern. Those became known as "cadence readers."

I suppose that nothing would stop someone from burning a DVD wth progressive info on them, but those are not standard NTSC disks designed for wide compatabiity - and the idea that cheap DVD players include circuitry to take progressive information and interlace it for compatibility with older TVs is upside down.

All standard NTSC DVDs are 480i, and the better players can deinterlace film-sourced disks for output - but for material captured using older interlaced video cameras, the signal should not be deinterlaced, as the comb effects and distortion of motion is not something that we've become inured to. That's why the 24p deinterlacing setting for DVDs is optional on Oppos, and the advice is to leave it off unless you're certain that the source is not video but film,

The exception to this is if you have a digital display or AVR that finds interlaced video indigestible, in which case you have to set your equipment to force progressive output and live with the resulting "comb" effects.

This is not entirely correct.


It is correct for the 3:2 cadence detection type of progressive output.


But 60i can be output as 60p by clever interpolation by the de-interlacer. You don't get combing effects like you suggest with this more intelligent method, because it doesn't merge both fields together in the first place. The only time it would do this is if there is NO movement in the picture in time between field 1 & field 2. Called 'Adaptive' de-interlacing & Upconversion to 480/60p or higher, like 1080/60p. Again, this is for true 1:1 cadence video material, not the filmic 3:2 kind.


You only get the dreaded 'combing' effect if it's not de-interlaced properly. A decision has to be made on whether the source is 3:2 film material source or 1:1 traditional video source, with 60 unique images per second.

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post #37819 of 37901 Old 01-13-2020, 02:13 AM
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As I said in my first reply to Philnick

"For the sake of accuracy...

With regard to movie DVD's, the vast majority are encoded with progressive video frames. However, the MPEG-2 video stream is 'flagged' as being interlaced."


Would it help if I mentioned that, back in the day, I used to encode MPEG-2 in both PAL and NTSC for 'show-reel' DVD's. For people who work in the TV/movie industry. Everything is on the internet now...

Anyway... For anyone who knows how to extract the MPEG-2 video stream from a movie DVD. All you have to do is load the MPEG-2 video stream into an application such as VirtualDub2 and step through the frames one at a time. It's easy to spot the progressive frames from the 'pull-down' frames.... 'using your eyes'!
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post #37820 of 37901 Old 01-13-2020, 04:47 AM
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Official OPPO UDP-203 Owner's Thread

Exactly my experience while re-encoding my collection, I could tell the progressive material from the interlaced after loading it in any authoring program. If progressive I would only do IVTC which removed the pull down, If interlaced then run adaptive de-interlace and pull down. The quality on the progressive stream was always better.

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post #37821 of 37901 Old 01-14-2020, 10:37 AM
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Article written by Don Munsil (of Spears & Munsil) back in the early 2000s that addresses these issues.

DVD Benchmark Part 5 - Progressive Scan DVD

The index to the entire series of articles is here:

DVD Benchmark - Introduction to the Benchmark Tests
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post #37822 of 37901 Old 01-14-2020, 03:13 PM
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Universal Media Server No Longer Visible in Network, But Windows Media Sharing Library is..
Universal Media Server says the Oppo 203 is connected.

Has this happened to anyone?
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post #37823 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 09:34 AM
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4k Streaming issues over DLNA

Hello,

I've got an issue, perhaps somewhat of a niche case, but perhaps not, so I'm turning here.

Background:
For a couple of years, I've had my media collection on an external HDD plugged directly into my 203 via USB. It has worked flawlessly, allowing me to play multichannel DSD files, Atmos/DTS:X enabled MKVs, the lot. The drawback was that it was located in a completely different part of my house, far from my computer, so syncing up the hard drive as I ripped newly acquired media is a bit of a chore, enough so that I tend to fall way behind on it.

Another drawback is that my media collection is only available to that one device, and cannot be played via other TV sets in my house (in particular, my daughter watches kids content in another room sometimes).

Solution? Well not really:
I recently installed PLEX on my desktop PC, and set up the libraries. For non high-res content, this is working great. I can access music and most movies from anywhere no problem. Obviously, there are no apps for the 203, but I can access all the files via DLNA.

Problem:
In spite of having a Google Wifi mesh network (with 3 access points), it seems that I have insufficient bandwidth to stream BD/4k content to the Oppo via DLNA. Additionally, it won't see any of the BD Folders I've created. Everything I try to play in HD or above stutters constantly, and files are completely unplayable. Additionally, folder navigation via this method is sloooooow.


So, what might some of you suggest? For accessing BD Folders, I know I can set up an SMB share instead, but this doesn't solve my bandwidth problem.

Ideally, I'd like to find some way to stream via SMB that will circumvent the bandwidth constraints, or have a way to sync up that external HDD without having to unplug everything and lug it to my office, plug it back in, sync, then repeat in reverse...

Ideas?

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post #37824 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csprague View Post
Ideally, I'd like to find some way to stream via SMB that will circumvent the bandwidth constraints, or have a way to sync up that external HDD without having to unplug everything and lug it to my office, plug it back in, sync, then repeat in reverse...

Ideas?
You don't circumvent a bandwidth problem, you fix it. Not a topic for this thread though. Barring that you should just stay with your past process with the physical HDD. One thing that simplifies that setup is to use a couple of HDD docks (one at each location) making it pretty easy to move a drive back and forth.
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post #37825 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 11:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdgrimes View Post
You don't circumvent a bandwidth problem, you fix it. Not a topic for this thread though. Barring that you should just stay with your past process with the physical HDD. One thing that simplifies that setup is to use a couple of HDD docks (one at each location) making it pretty easy to move a drive back and forth.
Yeah, the more I think about it, the more I think it makes sense to dig out my old gigabit switch and run ethernet through the walls to the main access point next to the modem. A one time hassle, but I it would solve the problem at hand. Before doing that, I could try an ethernet cable directly to that room's wifi mesh point. I doubt it will make much difference but I have nothing to lose.

As for hard drive docks, this might work if I had bare drives, but it's in a WD Elements enclosure. I guess I could shuck it.

Thanks.

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post #37826 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
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Thanks.
I’d try SMB first, just because DLNA is failing over WiFi does not mean SMB will.

Just run an Ethernet though, or try a Powerline type connection if want to exhaust other possibilities.

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post #37827 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 12:47 PM
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Reading some older posts to this thread, it sounds like Oppo products and Windows 10 SMB are basically impossible to set up? Something to do with Oppo only supporting SMB 1.0, Windows 10 *not* supporting it, and needing an entirely different computer on the network running an earlier version of windows to work as the "master browser", whatever that is?

Ugh...

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post #37828 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csprague View Post
Reading some older posts to this thread, it sounds like Oppo products and Windows 10 SMB are basically impossible to set up? Something to do with Oppo only supporting SMB 1.0, Windows 10 *not* supporting it, and needing an entirely different computer on the network running an earlier version of windows to work as the "master browser", whatever that is?

Ugh...
If you're interested here's the where you can find the: OPPO BDP-83/93/95/10x/20x DLNA/UPnP/SMB/network thread
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post #37829 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 01:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csprague View Post
Reading some older posts to this thread, it sounds like Oppo products and Windows 10 SMB are basically impossible to set up? Something to do with Oppo only supporting SMB 1.0, Windows 10 *not* supporting it, and needing an entirely different computer on the network running an earlier version of windows to work as the "master browser", whatever that is?

Ugh...
See if the FAQ is of any help: How do I access SMB shares on Windows 10?

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post #37830 of 37901 Old 01-15-2020, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeigh07 View Post
Universal Media Server No Longer Visible in Network, But Windows Media Sharing Library is..
Universal Media Server says the Oppo 203 is connected.

Has this happened to anyone?
After a bunch of hassle, I finally did get SMB working. It took hard wire to the cabinet, but was worth it. I have the UMS from SourceForge working as well. I like the UMS better now that it’s working. So, WiFi is convenient, but infrastructure works much better with high speed wired ethernet, as fast as you can go.

I had some of the same troubles with getting the UMS to work initially. Are you current with SourceForge upgrades?

Repeating myself, I have good Wi-Fi, but never got things running well until I ran an ethernet wire under the floor to the stereo cabinet. I’m using CAT7 wire (helps shield RFI ), and high speed passive switches, (A Netgear & Cisco).

Even hardwired, initially I had similar issues, did the Universal Media Server upgrades, reinitialized my server using the same authorized folders, rebooted my OPPO 203, and all came up well. I think I brought up the server on my Mac first, then started the OPPO. It took a about a minute for the server to appear in the network tab. After that it isn’t an issue unless it’s not running when I boot my OPPO.

Advise of the folks above is solid too.

Cheers, Chris

Best, Chris
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