MDF vs plywood and truckbed liner Q's - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 02:04 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I did a search but there weren't any direct answers so I thought I'd post up.

I recently purchased a 15" Rythmik servo kit and installed it in the pre-made PE 3 cuft box with the intention of eventually making the Rythmik designed box. I'm now ready. My woodworking skills are excellent and have all of the correct tools.

So with that in mind, is it better to make the enclosure out of MDF or good quality birch plywood? As far as the finish is concerned, that is the second part of my thread and will undoubtedly play into the MDF/PLY question.

What I'm looking for is the better material acoustically. From a cuting and tool life perspective, using plywood would be better for me but would leave end grain as I do not plan miter the joints.

I've read that some folks are using bed liner as the finish. Can I buy the material and spray it on myself (I have an HVLP sprayer).

Bomber

It's never over, it's never finished....it's never cheap.

MY HT --> Show AVS Gallery Images
the bomber is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 03:16 PM
Senior Member
 
AlexE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Southern Cali, SD area
Posts: 438
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
The truck liner is roll on, like herculiner, comes in a bucket.

MDF is better IMO, and you can use both. Some people opt to make some sides out of one and then the rest out of the other to prevent resonance inherent to each. I would lean towards using MDF alone or in combination, but unless I was making a rugged, mondo-sized DJ cabinet on a tight budget I think I would avoid all-ply construction.
AlexE is offline  
post #3 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 05:26 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
mayhem13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: nj
Posts: 3,995
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked: 30
I've read many posts on this subject and have gotten many different opinions. There was a post from they guy who designs the exodus audio cabinets and he was emphatic about plywood over MDF in regards about stored energy and cabinet resonance. Since he designs these i figured there must be some trial and error experience and i went with an MDF baffle and Ply cabinet.
mayhem13 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 05:42 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I'm leaning towards a construction using both. I've read that a good voidless ply is better than MDF. My issue with MDF is the dust and how hard it is on the tools. Plywood cuts much better.

Any thoughts on this?

It's never over, it's never finished....it's never cheap.

MY HT --> Show AVS Gallery Images
the bomber is offline  
post #5 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 06:32 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
tundrSQ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,227
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by the bomber View Post

I'm leaning towards a construction using both. I've read that a good voidless ply is better than MDF. My issue with MDF is the dust and how hard it is on the tools. Plywood cuts much better.

Any thoughts on this?

13ply Baltic Birch is better in many ways.....the 3 that are not arguable have little to do with sound.

1. not dealing with mdf dust.
2. much stronger glue joints
3. lighter and more durable

Two negatives are also undeniable

1. 3 times the cost...I just paid $112 for 2 sheets of of 5x5 BB.
2. The splinters hurt...alot!!!


IMO if you can afford it....go for it. as for SQ....i really doubt you would hear a diffrence.

Tim
tundrSQ is offline  
post #6 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 06:42 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TheEAR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Montreal,CANADA
Posts: 3,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
tundrSQ,

I agree fully,...quality void free ply all the way.

MDF strong point ...its dirt cheap. Quality ply is not as harsh on the tools and you do not need to decontaminate a work area after you remove 5lbs of dust from your mask.

MDF is heavy,MDF having no longer fibers is easy to damage. MDF hates liquids...as resistant to them as a sponge.

Me I will never again use MDF,game over. Quality void free birch all the way.

Price,quality ply is not even expensive in the first place, up to $90 per 4*8 sheet that is pocket change,MDF...not worth the savings.

Ask yourself mortal , do you have as much displacement as me ? The answer is no unless you have a Windmere fan sub.
TheEAR is offline  
post #7 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 07:38 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 15
What are your thoughts on 7 ply?

It's never over, it's never finished....it's never cheap.

MY HT --> Show AVS Gallery Images
the bomber is offline  
post #8 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 07:46 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
DonoMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 4,089
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 246 Post(s)
Liked: 194
I've been using MDF, but I plan to do plywood next time. If you've got cabinet resonance, you didn't use enough material. Period. Can happen with any material you build with.
DonoMan is offline  
post #9 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 08:57 PM
Member
 
hossage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I opened a similiar thread on here about enclosure materials and didn't really get much of a response. Since then I have done a lot of research on the subject.

An enclosure shoule be stiff, massive, and damped. Stiffness raises the resonance of the wall vibrations. This is good because higher frequencies take more energy to produce from a cabinet, they do not penetrate the walls as easily and because they can be better damped with stuffing materials.

Increasing mass means it is harder for your walls to vibrate and create noise, but with the size of most subwoofers weight becomes an issue quickly.

Damping isnt so easily explained by a novice such as myself, but the concept is that sound energy becomes heat energy as it moves through the medium. Of recent interest to me is viscoelastic damping, in which a thin sheet of rubber seperates two stiff walls. This is most often employed with metal, which is stiff and has a high resonance. Ihe idea is that as sound excites the two sheets they sheer against each other while the rubber tries to hold them in place. The vibration turns sound into heat in the rubber.

Having said all of that, each material has its own resonance. I am really not an expert here but I found one study, which concluded that while plywood and MDF were similiar in stiffness and resonance points, the plywood stopped resonating faster and its resonance point increased more with stiffness. As they put it, the decay of the sound was faster. If sound is going to leak through your cabinet walls, at least it should leak through in an uncolored way rather than all blurring together into noise.

Mdf likes to resonate at about 160hz even if it is made stiff by increased its width, so you end up with a heavier box for little gain. Since there are air voids in particleboard and plywood, the fibers inside them that may be of different resonances can move on their own a little, which spreads the resonance of the material out a little. MDF has no such voids, and moves as a whole. Everyone who wrote in to my thread told me to use MDF, but none of them could explain why.

Good plywood is stiffer than MDF. Naysayers on this forum may allege otherwise, but I have experience in the forest products industry.

If you are a good wood worker, you might consider using a species of pine. The same weight of spruce or fir is much stiffer than MDF. You could use purpose made metal braces on the corners, and the cost would be reasonable. Thickness could be an issue, as you will want to go thicker with the less dense pine. Howard Hughes built the spruce goose out of spruce plywood, not MDF. The parts express featured project "the woody" doesnt look so bad for being pretty crude.

You may also consider HDF or hardboard. It will be variously advertised as masonite, duraboard, etc. and sold as subflooring, "green board," or moisture resistant paneling. Hardboard is a heat pressed particleboard which doesnt use much or any glue. It is very dense and stiff and easy to work with. If you went with hardboard you could have several panels and use an adhesive in between them to achieve a measure of viscoelastic damping. It would also allow you to use a thinner front baffle in order to cut down on reflections from the lip of the baffle cutout behind the woofer.

I used MDF (I bought it before i got wise) covered in fiberglass from a fiberglass kit in a speaker to achieve stiffness.

You could also go to builders square and buy eight feet of rebar for like five bucks and simply liquid nails it across the middle of your panels.

Either way, brace it like you were building a bridge to increase stiffness. Oddly, it seems that when a cabinet vibrates the whole thing vibrates, not just the middle of the panels, so mass would help even a very stiff enclosure. The panels may be of different sizes and resonances, so one panel may be moving in a different direction at a given time than another. Bracing would help this.

Leftover ceramic tiles could be dropped in between layers of wood. Ceramic would be ridiculously stiff.

If youre a good woodworker, dovetail joints glued together with rubber caulk would provide both strength and damping.

pretensioning the walls raises the resonance of the enclosure too, so bow the walls out with a clamp before you put your braces in.

You may also want to mount your woofer on a bead of silicone to reduce vibrations.

Since your enclosure will be so well built and will not have any resonances in the bass range to interfere with your speakers sound, stuffing the enclosure with fiberglass insulation will help you damp out higher frequencies. This will increase the apparent volume of your speaker, too, so be careful or read up. You could also stuff with foam or roofing paper or felt. I like the long strips of light, glued up felt sold as roofing/weatherstripping product. Ive seen it about a half an inch thick. The point is to damp reflections from the cabinet walls. (sorry if you already know all this and im wasting your time.)

Next time I make a speaker I will use a few layers of hardboard with a thin layer of silicon or acrylic latex adhesive between the panels. Good luck!
hossage is offline  
post #10 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 09:52 PM
Member
 
hossage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
http://www.lenehanaudio.com.au/enclosures.php ive come across so many of these sort of links...
hossage is offline  
post #11 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 09:58 PM
Senior Member
 
Canadian_Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 214
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Since a subwoofer doesn't usually go very high in frequency does the resonance of 150+ Hz affect the subs performance?
Canadian_Dude is offline  
post #12 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 10:16 PM
Member
 
hossage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Forget that link, this is way better


http://personal.inet.fi/koti/juhladu...ndproofing.htm
hossage is offline  
post #13 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 10:32 PM
Member
 
hossage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Canadian, im thinking if you can hear that resonance turned into sound by the vibrating panels of the sub then it is a problem.

If i went with a saran wrap on a frame enclosure i wouldnt have to worry about resonances above the range of the woofer. Then again I'd have a drum as a sub enclosure. lets assume it would distort my subs output and be pretty loud. I want my enclosure to be stiff and massive, so it takes more energy to vibrate it. But not stiff and massive like a ringing bell; I want it to be damped too, like a rubber covered panel on a beach of sand.

The good thing is that high frequencies wont go through speaker walls as easily as bass. Imagine placing a ringing cell phone in an entirely closed box vs a vibrating cell phone. Which one will you hear better?

(the Alex plus covered steel plates for my next speaker are drying in front of me)
hossage is offline  
post #14 of 37 Old 03-30-2008, 10:44 PM
Senior Member
 
Canadian_Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 214
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
OK thanks for clarifying, I think I get it now.
Canadian_Dude is offline  
post #15 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 07:18 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
DonoMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 4,089
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 246 Post(s)
Liked: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadian_Dude View Post

Since a subwoofer doesn't usually go very high in frequency does the resonance of 150+ Hz affect the subs performance?

Subwoofers do play 150Hz. If you cross your subwoofer at 75Hz, then it will still play at 150Hz but 6dB per order (usually 2 or 4 orders) down.
DonoMan is offline  
post #16 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 07:34 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TheEAR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Montreal,CANADA
Posts: 3,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
No matter how some may try to slice it...quality ply is stiffer than MDF.
MDF has zero long fibers,MDF is a compressed paste.

Take a good sheet of ply and a sheet of any MDF...the MDF feels like a heavy sheet of paper as it flexes.The ply has more of a stiffer spring.

MDF crumbles and disintegrates when in contact with higher humidity or liquids,not anyone wants to float his speakers or subs.

Ask yourself mortal , do you have as much displacement as me ? The answer is no unless you have a Windmere fan sub.
TheEAR is offline  
post #17 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 08:39 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Kevin_Wadsworth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 1,227
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 32
I don't think anyone is arguing that MDF is stiffer than ply. Btu for most, it holds up as "good enough" and saving $60 per sheet isn't pocket change to all.

I'll point out another small advantage (for me) to plywood. The back of our SUV is exactly 48" across. Plywood sheets are 48" across. Unfortunately, MDF is 49", making it a bit more of a challenge to transport.
Kevin_Wadsworth is offline  
post #18 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 09:22 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Anyone had success using birch plywood from Home Depot or Lowes?

It's never over, it's never finished....it's never cheap.

MY HT --> Show AVS Gallery Images
the bomber is offline  
post #19 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 12:54 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TheEAR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Montreal,CANADA
Posts: 3,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by the bomber View Post

Anyone had success using birch plywood from Home Depot or Lowes?

I have.

The sheets they have ...$60-70 a sheet,at my local HD are of high quality and you can finish them with a wood sealer to get a great looking finished product.

Ask yourself mortal , do you have as much displacement as me ? The answer is no unless you have a Windmere fan sub.
TheEAR is offline  
post #20 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 01:27 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEAR View Post

I have.

The sheets they have ...$60-70 a sheet,at my local HD are of high quality and you can finish them with a wood sealer to get a great looking finished product.


That is good to know. Now for part two of my question.

Since I will now be making the enclosure out of plywood and there will be exposed endgrain, is DIY bed liner a good option for the finish? I'd like the final product to be black.

Bomber

It's never over, it's never finished....it's never cheap.

MY HT --> Show AVS Gallery Images
the bomber is offline  
post #21 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 01:53 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TheEAR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Montreal,CANADA
Posts: 3,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Sorry I never used bedliner,have no experience with it.

Ask yourself mortal , do you have as much displacement as me ? The answer is no unless you have a Windmere fan sub.
TheEAR is offline  
post #22 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 02:44 PM
AVS Forum Club Gold
 
Greg_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Portland, OR USA
Posts: 3,831
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:


Anyone had success using birch plywood from Home Depot or Lowes?

I have used this cheap garbage and it has delaminated on me (the glue holding the plys together has failed under normal conditions). Each Home Depot and Lowes can carry a different product so this may not pertain to your local store. However, for critical applications I will only use stuff with a known name brand (Appleply, etc.) or a sheet good that is certified (Lloyds of London does this for marine grade ply and other boat building materials, etc.).

Quote:


What are your thoughts on 7 ply?

I've done a lot of woodworking and have come across some bad 7-ply plywood (larger parts slightly warp, etc.). For example, I just finished up a 14' long bookshelf built-in and the 7-ply walnut ply that I used had some warping issues. The face frame pulled it back into place but it was another hassle. As I'm sure you know, 7-ply plywood is typically 3 thick layers of pine or some other cheap wood, 2 thin layers of pine, and 2 even thinner layers of wood that are used as a backer for the expensive wood (Walnut, birds eye maple, etc.). The expensive wood is microns thin (it may look like ~1mm from the side but that is the backer layer that you are seeing). It is very easy to sand through the outer wood layer. Also, the thick pine layers can cause some warping depending on the quality of the product. For speaker building, I like to use MDF (or Appleply w. MDF exterior + decoupling layer) and then veneer it with a high quality veneer of a known thickness or cover it in 1/8" or more of actual wood (if you want decorative touches like through-dovetails, exposed box joints, etc.). I hit everything with a seal coat (inside and out) to prevent moisture from getting to the wood.

Quote:


Everyone who wrote in to my thread told me to use MDF, but none of them could explain why.

Take a piece of each and hit it with a hammer or your knuckles... which one rings longer? The reason to use MDF is that it has better self-dampening (it gets rid of unwanted vibrations more quickly than the plywood does). All of the other things that you posted about (multi-layer construction techniques, etc.) are ways of increasing the self-dampening of the panel. Why not start with a product that has excellent self-dampening and improve it further with the multi-layer techniques? Plywood's main advantage in speaker building is it's lighter weight (don't fool yourselves... the dust is still nasty). People use plywood on subwoofers because the fundamental resonance of the material is outside the frequency range of the sub (and the lighter weight makes moving the box around less painful). For multi-layer construction plywood's extra stiffness can be a plus if additional layers of MDF or other dampener are used. However, for a subwoofer it would be easier to add another brace (far more effective and cheaper). With a 2 or 3-way design adding a brace may not be as trivial (the design impact could be significant).
Greg_R is offline  
post #23 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 04:28 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
tundrSQ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,227
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by the bomber View Post

Anyone had success using birch plywood from Home Depot or Lowes?

STAY AWAY FROM THAT CRAP!!!!!! ITS CHEAP JUNK FROM CHINA AND IT SUCKS TO WORK WITH. I WOULD CHOOSE MDF ANYDAY OVER HD BIRCH PLY, IT IS NOT BALTIC BIRCH!!!

sorry for the caps

Tim
tundrSQ is offline  
post #24 of 37 Old 03-31-2008, 08:17 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Tack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Valencia, Ca
Posts: 11,168
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4790 Post(s)
Liked: 6417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg_R View Post

I have used this cheap garbage and it has delaminated on me -snip- significant).


Very informative post. Thanks
Tack is offline  
post #25 of 37 Old 04-01-2008, 05:46 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I guess the debate goes on. Clearly there are two different camps wrt plywood vs MDF. As I started out saying my woodworking skills are excellent but in this case, I'm really just trying to make a solid black enclosure. No fancy joinery, no veneer (although I have thousands of dollars worth of exotic veneer I've accumulated over the years), just a solid box that will be encapsulated in bedliner.

All the speakers I have made in the past have used MDF. In most cases I used my vaccum press to laminate two 3/4 sheets. Yes the speakers are very heavy and solid. I'm not so worried about the weight because other than moving it around to initially find the sweet spot, I do not plan to move it.

I have also had excellent luck using Lowes birch as a substrate in my furniture projects. I find machining plywood is much easier on me and my tools. In particular, I hate routing MDF. I think my skin is slightly allergic to the dust. The dust gets everywhere and clogs the exhaust chute of the router. In addition, the speaker will be heavily braced with lots of lightening holes (2" to 2.5" dia). I can easily use a Forstner bit on ply. How well would it work on MDF?

Bomber

It's never over, it's never finished....it's never cheap.

MY HT --> Show AVS Gallery Images
the bomber is offline  
post #26 of 37 Old 04-01-2008, 10:23 AM
Member
 
hossage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Dear Greg,


If you would rap your knuckles against my drooping lovehandles and then do the same to a piece of MDF, I suspect you would conclude that speakers should be built out of the shame that is my waistline. In which case I would be glad to donate my physical indulgence and self-loathing to the milieu of your mental MDF morass through liposuction.

Perhaps I have been a poor sport here and not provided any facts to back up my position. But the amount of bed wetting I get from MDF fans is more self damping than than that gluestick in a board can provide.

Consider, momentarily, an alternate but similiar universe in which I am not always right and have joined the MDF camp. In that case I would save my money on MDF and make a subwoofer out of old phone book paper mache' and latex primer paint. Heck, while I'm at it I might as well save the earth and start cutting up soup and pop cans into flat strips for a meaure of shielding. A well made aluminum strip enclosure would be about ideal. Aluminum backed plywood has been used in aircraft design.
hossage is offline  
post #27 of 37 Old 04-01-2008, 01:45 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Tack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Valencia, Ca
Posts: 11,168
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4790 Post(s)
Liked: 6417
Quote:
Originally Posted by hossage View Post

Dear Greg,


If you would rap your knuckles against my drooping lovehandles and then do the same to a piece of MDF, I suspect you would conclude that speakers should be built out of the shame that is my waistline. In which case I would be glad to donate my physical indulgence and self-loathing to the milieu of your mental MDF morass through liposuction.

Anyone know how to un-read something? Need a little help here.
Tack is offline  
post #28 of 37 Old 04-01-2008, 01:52 PM
AVS Forum Club Gold
 
Nasty N8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Lake in the hills IL
Posts: 1,032
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Man you had to bring it to my attention....AAHHHH

www.NastyPerformance.com

10,000 Watts, custom built speakers, 10' CIH screen = Holy Crap
Nasty N8 is offline  
post #29 of 37 Old 04-01-2008, 02:10 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I decided to try Lowes Birch. The plywood looked pretty good so I asked a customer service rep if he minded cutting the 4x8 sheet down into more manageable pieces. It's tough to accurately cut a full sheet of plywood on a table saw all by your lonesome.

THAT WAS MISTAKE NUMERO UNO

When I got the "strips" home I noticed that they were trapazoids

Thankfully I was able to square them up. So far I have two sides cut to size and 3 more at rough dimension. God I wish the plywood was 3/4 inch instead of 11/16.

The baffle will be two sheets laminated together and are currently in the vaccum press. I will take pictures of the assembly and final product and write up a complete review.

Stay tuned and continue the debate!

Bomber

It's never over, it's never finished....it's never cheap.

MY HT --> Show AVS Gallery Images
the bomber is offline  
post #30 of 37 Old 04-01-2008, 03:35 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TheEAR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Montreal,CANADA
Posts: 3,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundrSQ View Post

STAY AWAY FROM THAT CRAP!!!!!! ITS CHEAP JUNK FROM CHINA AND IT SUCKS TO WORK WITH. I WOULD CHOOSE MDF ANYDAY OVER HD BIRCH PLY, IT IS NOT BALTIC BIRCH!!!

sorry for the caps


Excuse me...

My local HD has RUSSIAN Baltic birch,the high quality one and good quality birch from the USA and Canada. Not the PRC ...newspaper birch.

Ask yourself mortal , do you have as much displacement as me ? The answer is no unless you have a Windmere fan sub.
TheEAR is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply DIY Speakers and Subs

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off