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-   -   Anarchy/Dayton TM build (https://www.avsforum.com/forum/155-diy-speakers-subs/1362170-anarchy-dayton-tm-build.html)

PassingInterest 09-23-2011 05:53 AM

This small ported 2-way is a Rick Craig design (of Selah Audio).
It calls for a 0.75 Cubic Foot cabinet and uses an Exodus Anarchy 6.5" for the low end and a Dayton Audio RS28F-4 1-1/8" Silk Dome Tweeter.

You will need to contact Rick Craig if you want the plans for this build. You can contact him here: [email protected]

Many thanks to BigJim75 for allowing me the opportunity to showcase the curvomatic to form the cabinet's curved sides--found here: www.curvomatic.com. Very easy to remember.

Jim is currently offering a 20% discount to forum members.

Square88 02-16-2012 07:41 AM

any idea when we can expect your build?

filtor1 02-16-2012 08:36 AM

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Sent him a PM. Thank you for linking this. I look forward to your build.

Side note, I have an acct over there but can't reply to the post. grr.

PassingInterest 02-16-2012 12:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Square88 View Post

any idea when we can expect your build?

Soon. It's next up and it will be the one in which I showcase the Curve-O-Matic, to form the curved cabinet sides.


Quote:
Originally Posted by filtor1 View Post

Sent him a PM. Thank you for linking this. I look forward to your build.

Side note, I have an acct over there but can't reply to the post. grr.

Try this: [email protected]

Here is Rick's Selah Audio website.

Square88 02-16-2012 12:42 PM

Thanks for the update. I really enjoy your builds.

PassingInterest 02-16-2012 01:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Square88 View Post

Thanks for the update. I really enjoy your builds.

Your welcome and thank-you very much.

I'm not quite ready to begin just yet, but here's a shot of the drivers.


filtor1 02-16-2012 03:12 PM

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I got him via PM PI. TY!

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post

Soon. It's next up and it will be the one in which I showcase the Curve-O-Matic, to form the curved cabinet sides.




Try this: [email protected]

Here is Rick's Selah Audio website.


Bigjim75 02-17-2012 01:18 AM

Now I've seen those drivers I can't wait to see what you have planned for the cabs.
Your Curvomatic kit is going in the post today. www.curvomatic.com

PassingInterest 02-17-2012 04:14 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim75 View Post

Now I've seen those drivers I can't wait to see what you have planned for the cabs.
Your Curvomatic kit is going in the post today. www.curvomatic.com

Many thanks Big Jim, for allowing me to showcase your Curvomatic in my project. I've updated the thread title and the first post in this thread to reflect this new development.

Well, I thought I had edited the thread title, but I guess I don't have the power to do that after all.

maxmercy 02-17-2012 05:50 AM

Popcorn is in the microwave, just need to hit 'Start'.

Will Rick put up a page on his website for these? Sounds like a GREAT TM, with some good power handling. Great for a smaller HT.

JSS

PassingInterest 02-17-2012 05:58 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmercy View Post

Popcorn is in the microwave, just need to hit 'Start'.

Will Rick put up a page on his website for these? Sounds like a GREAT TM, with some good power handling. Great for a smaller HT.

JSS

That's a good idea about Rick putting up a page on his site for these. I'll suggest it to him.

filtor1 02-17-2012 06:30 AM

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I wonder if Exodus would do some sort of discount for us as well? That would be sweet. I missed the initial Gb they did. I like the possibility of an MTM version as well.

PassingInterest 02-17-2012 06:54 AM

Kevin has them on sale right now already. I don't know if he would discount them even further. I guess we can hope.

djkest 02-17-2012 07:38 AM

Awesome concept, can't wait to see what you do with this. I'm guessing the RS28F is going to have to be padded down about 10 dB but the power handling should be quite decent. Depending on the alignment the Anarchy can take well over 100W (not sure what the thermal limits are).

You might want to double-up or tripple-up the resistors in the L-pad for power handling purposes, and then hook these up to 200+ W amp to see what they can do.

PassingInterest 02-17-2012 01:45 PM

djkest--Good tip on doubling or tripling up on the resistors to make sure they can handle the wattage. I'm sure you're right about padding the tweeter. I can't swear to it exactly, but 10 dB is probably about right.

LTD02 02-17-2012 01:55 PM

"Good tip on doubling or tripling up on the resistors to make sure they can handle the wattage."

for some, this will be very confusing. the idea is to use more and/or higher power resistors that provide the same net resistance as the stock model.

if one just doubles or triples the same resistors, the whole crossover will change.

PassingInterest 02-17-2012 03:41 PM

Thanks for clarifying, LTD02.
Yeah, the idea is to increase surface area to insure good dissipation of heat, but still keep the net resistance the same, like you said.

I've already got the resistors originally called for, so I may run with them temporarily, as long as I make provisions for more on the crossover board so I can change them out later.

PassingInterest 02-20-2012 11:01 AM

I am learning how to use Eagle software to create a PCB layout, so I can make the crossovers for these speakers while I await the arrival of the Curvomatic. I'll go into the board layout stuff some more later.

Yesterday, I took a few minutes and made some clamping cauls, which I documented at the Shack. Here is a link, in case any of you fine folks here are interested.

djkest 02-20-2012 12:11 PM

Yeah sorry. So if you had say a 10 ohm resistor that is rated for 10 watts, you could instead substitute 3 30 ohm resistors in parallel to equal a net resistance of 10 ohms, but giving you 3x the power handling.

It's basic circuit stuff, and most people know about that, but some don't.

I'm not sure if you ever need to do this with anything other than Resistors though.

As far as construction details go, what material will you be making the sides out of? I'm guessing the overall dimensions of this speaker are going to be ~9 x 12 x 16", am I close? Anxious to see how you do this, as I am in the planning phase of my own curved speaker build.

PassingInterest 02-20-2012 02:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

As far as construction details go, what material will you be making the sides out of? I'm guessing the overall dimensions of this speaker are going to be ~9 x 12 x 16", am I close? Anxious to see how you do this, as I am in the planning phase of my own curved speaker build.

You are close on the dimensions. I haven't firmed things up yet concerning style, material or exact dimensions, but I intend to stay pretty close to the original 0.75 cubic foot enclosure size that Rick used.

johngalt47 02-23-2012 04:39 PM

I don't know if anyone is interested but I just measured one of my Anarchy woofers and here are the T/S params:

Fs = 46.43
Qes = 0.46
Qms = 7.627
Qts = 0.424
Vas = 19.7 L (which is wildly different that the published 9.61 which leads me to believe that it is a typo on the web site since all the other values are close)
Re = 6.321
Le = 1.438
SPL = 88.21

This is on a brand new, not broken in driver. YMMV

PassingInterest 02-23-2012 05:01 PM

Thank you very much, John.

johngalt47 02-24-2012 04:47 AM

I had asked Kevin about that VAS measurement and he said to go with his value, not the one I calculated. I'll ask Rick what his measurement was.

Rick didn't measure the VAS.

Rick Craig 02-24-2012 06:29 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by johngalt47 View Post

I had asked Kevin about that VAS measurement and he said to go with his value, not the one I calculated. I'll ask Rick what his measurement was.

Rick didn't measure the VAS.

Let me clarify. Before I tested the woofer I looked at the Voice Coil magazine measurements. I used their parameters as a starting point and chose a test box based on my experience with woofers of similar size. I then did nearfield testing and summed the output of the woofer and port.

With a nearfield measurement being large signal it's more accurate than a simple T/S set of parameters. In this case I think it's even more important because the Xbl motor's inductance changes quite a bit over excursion. Looking at your parameters I would say that my box volume and tuning matches them very well.

Rick Craig 02-24-2012 06:32 AM

Sorry for my late reply. I didn't put up a page on my site because it was my understanding that the woofer was no longer in production. I have been told there might be a 4-ohm version available; however, that would dictate a new crossover design.


Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmercy View Post

Popcorn is in the microwave, just need to hit 'Start'.

Will Rick put up a page on his website for these? Sounds like a GREAT TM, with some good power handling. Great for a smaller HT.

JSS


PassingInterest 02-24-2012 07:52 AM

Thanks for the clarification, Rick
Kevin is still selling the 8 ohm version.
I mentioned the new 4 ohm Anarchy in the works to indicate that he is still keeping the business going, just scaled down.

PassingInterest 02-25-2012 06:33 AM

The Curvomatic has arrived, so I should start making some progress soon.

johngalt47 02-26-2012 05:10 AM

He is still selling the 8 ohm version because I just bought 2 of them.

johngalt47 02-26-2012 05:11 AM

Since I don't get Voice Coil magazine, was it Vance who worked with this driver?

Rick Craig 02-26-2012 01:23 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by johngalt47 View Post

Since I don't get Voice Coil magazine, was it Vance who worked with this driver?

Yes

PassingInterest 02-29-2012 09:45 AM

The Curvomatic.




Rick's design used the PE 0.75 Cubic Foot Curved cabinet.
I don't have one, but I will try to make mine pretty close to theirs.
Here I experimented with curves and offsets until I found a look that I liked.


mjaudio 02-29-2012 10:23 AM

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post



I am shocked you can make such beautiful subs out of cardboard, your a true artist

mjaudio 02-29-2012 10:24 AM

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Oh wait, this isn't the mini-gun build!

I meant beautiful speakers.

I got confused which PI build I was following.

PassingInterest 03-01-2012 02:22 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjaudio View Post

Oh wait, this isn't the mini-gun build!

I got confused which PI build I was following.

Haha! I just hope I don't get them confused when I try to install the drivers. Just kidding.

PassingInterest 03-01-2012 02:46 PM

At first I thought I might try something a bit more wavy for the cabinet sides, but I decided to go the easy route for this build and just do a simple curve.

I cut a curved form.




Then duplicated it.





The layout.
Draw a line tangent to the curve at both ends. (All this is in the instructions at the Curvomatic site in both video and text).



Draw a line between 20-30 degrees from the previous line (I went with 25).



The reason for the second line is to position the straps at the best location for pulling at the angle that works best.

I now know the length I need for the 2x4s the forms mount to.




I was out of 2x4 stock, so I ripped a 2x8.
Round the ends so the straps can slide easily as needed.
I doubted the strength of 1.5" thick pine under pressure, but I wanted to try it anyway.




Forms ready for the first dry run.




Secure the bottom cheek.




The pine flexed rather a lot, but I still got a nearly perfect front edge curve.
The top cheek needed a little repositioning and the pine needs to be made stronger, because it is too thin for this much pressure.




The trailing edge needs work. I need to add another section or two on the top cheek.




This was my first dry run test (no glue) and I am pleased with what I see.
After some adjustments, I will try again tomorrow.

Jstslamd 03-01-2012 03:18 PM

Looking good

PassingInterest 03-03-2012 02:52 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jstslamd View Post

Looking good

Thanks, man.


The pine 2x that bowed under pressure--I made them into I-beams and they're pretty solid now. I know it's overkill, but I wanted to use up some plywood scraps I had.




Here's the first glue-up and it's looking good. I used a stack of three 1/4" MDF.




mjaudio 03-03-2012 03:04 PM

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I can't even get one project started and I think you have 3 going on at the same time. I get so exhausted watching your progress that I am too tired to start up my own

Your builds are world class Dan! Always my favorite threads to follow.

lowpolyjoe 03-03-2012 04:32 PM

Even your clamping rigs are a thing of beauty. Great demo for the Curvomatic. Great stuff!

All this work going on and your shop still looks tidy! My garage is an absolute pig sty during a build (and usually for a few weeks afterwards)

PassingInterest 03-03-2012 05:08 PM

Thanks guys.
MJAudio--You're right. I actually do have three different projects going on at the same time in the garage.

PassingInterest 03-07-2012 11:32 AM

I wondered how much spring-back I would get, once the straps were removed.
It didn't move much at all.


PassingInterest 03-08-2012 09:02 AM

For the first curved panel, I wrestled a bit with positioning the top cheek along the front edge of the panel. Tightening the straps pushed the top cheek back from the edge. I went back and forth a few times before I got it right--loosen the straps, realign, re-tighten, oops, loosen again. I got it right on the fourth try. With a little more experience, I'm sure I could get it right on the first try.

But, I tried a slightly different approach with the second panel.
I began by applying clamps on the front edge to lock everything in place.




Then I tightened the straps.
Tightening the straps is easier if you push downward to tighten, because you can put your body weight into it. It's pretty effortless, really.


tuxedocivic 03-08-2012 09:09 AM

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Very cool.

Watching your builds makes me want to build. Gotta do something.

PassingInterest 03-08-2012 01:59 PM

Thanks, TC.

Encouraged by how well the second panel glue-up went, I decided to try applying the veneer at the same time that I glue-up the third panel.
It will be a neat trick if I can shape a curved panel and veneer it in a single step.

Again, I'm gluing three 1/4" MDF panels, using Titebond II.
Since I've had some trouble with water-based glues wrinkling the veneer in the past, I decided to use some 60 minute epoxy for the veneer on this panel.

Later, I will experiment with other glues.

Some waxed paper acts as a barrier to prevent glue seepage from getting on the top MDF sheet, permanently gluing it over the veneer.




The top MDF sheet is 1/8" thick. It was a pallet protector. I was in the right place at the right time and Home Depot let me have it for 51 cents.




Again, I clamped the front edge first to keep things aligned and then applied pressure with the straps.


BeerParty 03-08-2012 02:44 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post

The top MDF sheet is 1/8" thick. It was a pallet protector. I was in the right place at the right time and Home Depot let me have it for 51 cents.

Alright, where is the 'green-with-envy' emoticon?

Looking good PI, I am looking forward to see how your new 'veneer press' measures up to your T100*.

* for those who didn't read PI's previous builds, he once used his Toyota T100 pickup as a veneer press.

PassingInterest 03-09-2012 11:01 AM

You're a funny guy, Chris! Thanks.

I looked really close and I don't see any veneer bubbles.
I believe I got good adhesion for the veneer and curved the panels at the same time. Obviously, I haven't sanded yet, but this looks very good to me.

I over-sized the panels a bit, but it shouldn't be a problem at all.


Square88 03-10-2012 07:45 PM

Looking great PI. I really like reading your threads. They are always making me wish I had more woodworking tools and time to use them.

PassingInterest 03-20-2012 10:32 AM

Thanks, Square88!
I needed to take a week off.

Found this waiting for me in the garage. Soon after, he wasn't feeling very well.




Now for the tops and bottoms.














And some braces.




PassingInterest 03-20-2012 01:27 PM




Aah! Clamps at last!
PL Premium construction adhesive was used on the vertical braces, TiteBond II elsewhere and 18 gauge brads were used to pin it.


tuxedocivic 03-20-2012 02:21 PM

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Ahhh, I was going through withdrawl. No more breaks

johngalt47 03-22-2012 09:48 AM

PI,
What is the volume of the box?

PassingInterest 03-22-2012 12:58 PM

Thanks, TC!
JohnGalt47--It should be real close to 0.75 cubic feet.

I just got back in town and should be back on this project tomorrow.

PassingInterest 03-23-2012 09:59 AM

Clamps off.








Trim a little off.


dbldare 03-23-2012 10:34 AM

PI - Too sweet as always!

You should name these after your new 8 legged "friend". Widow Maker comes to mind.


dbl

PassingInterest 03-23-2012 10:59 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbldare View Post

PI - Too sweet as always!

You should name these after your new 8 legged "friend". Widow Maker comes to mind.


dbl

Great name! I may have to use it. And thanks for the compliment.

BP1Fanatic 03-23-2012 11:46 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjaudio View Post

i can't even get one project started and i think you have 3 going on at the same time. I get so exhausted watching your progress that i am too tired to start up my own:d

your builds are world class dan! Always my favorite threads to follow.

exactly, lol!!!

PassingInterest 03-23-2012 12:51 PM

BP1Fanatic--Thanks!




mjaudio 03-23-2012 01:54 PM

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That veneer is so good looking, you have an excellent sense of what looks good.

BeerParty 03-23-2012 02:07 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post


Nice! It looks like those Curvomatic pre-curved sides made things much easier at this stage of the build.

mjaudio 03-23-2012 02:17 PM

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Your right, that Curvomatic is one slick tool. Your user name being BeerParty I have a natural inclination to agree with anything you say anyway

Looks like PassingInterest is going to cost me more money in tools for a Curvomatic. He just has a way of showing how to properly use a tool and making me want one. Now if I only had his skills

PassingInterest 03-23-2012 04:40 PM

Haha! Thanks guys!
You're right, the Curvomatic made this build go much easier.
Plus, the sides can be curved and veneered in a single step, which helps speed things up.

I waited until I got the sides on the cabs, before saying much about the Curvomatic, because I wanted to see how it went.

I like it. It makes cab assembly a breeze. The great thing about the Curvomatic is you can change the curves at any time, just by making new, simple forms to mount the Curvomatic to. And, you're not limited to simple curves, you can go wavy or whatever. Check the videos at the Curvomatic site. It's worth a look.

lowpolyjoe 03-23-2012 05:54 PM

It really is looking great PI. Is that the Bubinga from the Howitzer build? Fantastic look to that veneer.

PassingInterest 03-23-2012 06:03 PM

Joe--It's the same kind of Bubinga, but from a different lot. These sheets were too small to use on the larger Howitzer cabinets.

PassingInterest 03-26-2012 08:50 AM

My friend hasn't had a chance to pick up his cabs yet and I thought I'd like to see the size contrast between these.

Straps off and Widow Makers on Mini-Guns.





Thanks for the name suggestion, dbldare!

PassingInterest 03-26-2012 09:12 AM

Trim some waste.






Getting set up.


PassingInterest 03-26-2012 10:08 AM

A few years ago I read a warning in a woodworking magazine about breathing MDF dust. It said that in addition to urea formaldehyde and glue particles, the actual fibers in Medium Density Fiberboard are particularly bad for your lungs.

When I later mentioned this to a friend who builds houses on the side, he said it made sense to him. His main job was at a disposable diaper manufacturing plant and he said they had very strict health rules in parts of the plant, because of the air-borne fiber particles.

Play it safe and protect your lungs.




I wanted to try this along the front edges.
The curved cabinet can rock and ruin the edge, but as long as I keep it angled enough throughout the cut, I can sand it the rest of the way later and avoid building a one-time use carriage or trimming jig, which most people won't want to build anyway. This seems easier.




The front went well enough that I decided to do the back the same way.


lowpolyjoe 03-26-2012 11:56 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post

Play it safe and protect your lungs.

+100. that dust is nasty. i don't even go into my garage without a mask these days if i'm going to be in there more than a minute or two. hoping to put up some plastic sheeting soon to keep that fine MDF dust from filling both bays of my garage during future builds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post



Unless my eyes deceive me, looks like you got the same dent from the router bearing edge that i got in my recent curved build doing a similar trim. Are you going to use the iron-and-water approach or something else to get that out? Or are you going to fill it and veneer over it? My cabinets were small, but you have a much longer line to deal with. Very curious how you address it.

PassingInterest 03-26-2012 02:16 PM

Joe--By the time I finished sanding, the bearing-dent line was nearly gone. I puttied what remained of it.


I can grind things down pretty fast with the Bosch set to Agressive mode.




I can finish it with the Bosch, but the Festool is pretty nice.




lowpolyjoe 03-26-2012 02:21 PM

Definitely jealous of your tool collection

petew 03-26-2012 05:33 PM

and skill (gift)!

Woodfiend 03-26-2012 07:04 PM

I am jealous of your veneer. I had veneered some boxes with raw waterfall bubinga but hadn't trimmed the overhanging edges.... well apparently the boxes were in my wife's way. She moved them and stood them up on the ends and broke off and cracked the veneer up into the sides of the speakers themselves ...... needless to say I haven't touched them since. I don't have the heart.
I have started new boxes though....

Nice work all around. I enjoy following your threads.

Audiophile34 03-26-2012 07:23 PM

@woodfiend.. where is she buried?

@passinginterest.. phenomenal build, absoluty pristine.

PassingInterest 03-27-2012 06:15 AM

Thanks guys. You are way too kind.

Woodfiend--sorry to hear about the veneer getting wrecked.
You're right, sometimes you just have to set it aside for a while.
If you find that you can't repair it satisfactorily and need to remove it and start again, a heat gun will soften most glues enough that you can scrape it off easily. You probably know that already, but others reading this might find it helpful.

Waterfall Bubinga was my first choice for this project, but the few leaves that I have on hand are not wide enough to cover a side without stitching and I didn't want any seams in the sides, except at the front baffle.

djkest 03-27-2012 06:39 AM

I was wondering how I was going to get the back of my curved cabinet build flat. I think you have the right idea! I'll flush trim it as close as I can get, and then use a wide sander to flatten it out. Awesome. I do also have a 12" plane that I used a lot, works OK but planes take actual skill so not real good for me.

Might take me a while to sand 35"...
Layers are all 1/8", Baltic birch plywood, MDF, and then 1 layer of HDF on top. I am going to paint mine I think, since I am scared of veneer.

PassingInterest 03-27-2012 07:26 AM

djkest--My cabs are small enough that I went a different way, but since you have four 35" edges to contend with on the backs alone, you might want to consider another approach to make things go faster and easier for you. The trimming jig shown in my Howitzer build might work well for you. Just adjust the size of the bottom plate to suit your needs. Adjust your depth of cut to leave just a little to sand off.

Taken from the Howitzer thread:





Perhaps you'll veneer a future cabinet when you're ready.
Hey, how about a link to your build? It's looking really good.

lowpolyjoe 03-27-2012 08:09 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodfiend View Post

She moved them and stood them up on the ends and broke off and cracked the veneer up into the sides of the speakers themselves ......

oh man - that is a tragedy

djkest 03-27-2012 11:34 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post

Perhaps you'll veneer a future cabinet when you're ready.
Hey, how about a link to your build? It's looking really good.

You are too kind! I am a hack woodworker but I know someone with a CNC router so that helps with some of my challenges.

Here's the build thread-
http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=230233

And here's the direct link to my album:
https://picasaweb.google.com/1165986...eat=directlink

PassingInterest 03-27-2012 12:10 PM

djkest--I looked at your build thread and your photo album and it really does look great! Very nice touch on the front. After looking again, I realized that you don't have a whole lot of material to remove on the backs, so sanding is not a bad way to go, if you prefer it. You should be fine as long as you keep your sander flat and level.


Cut some veneer for the backs.




This is what I meant about the bearing dent lines--they nearly completely disappeared during the sanding operation. They weren't very deep, but they were there.




Since the backs are only 4.5" wide and 17" tall, I decided to try some 5 minute epoxy. You have to move fast, but it can be done on such a small area.


PassingInterest 03-28-2012 12:59 PM

One step closer.


filtor1 03-28-2012 01:16 PM

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If I give you my address, will you send those to me. Killer job PI!

PassingInterest 03-28-2012 03:24 PM

Haha! Thanks, Filtor1.


Veneered both tops.


mjaudio 03-28-2012 06:21 PM

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Now that's what I like to see, a Dusty Shop Floor and your workshop resembling mine during a build! Now I don't feel so bad when it takes me awhile to clean up

Square88 04-01-2012 02:55 AM

Looking forward to your next update.

PassingInterest 04-01-2012 08:43 AM

Thanks guys.

MJAudio--I kind of miss my old friend Dusty ShopFloor. I think of him sometimes when I fire up the shop vac. (For those who don't know already--Dusty ShopFloor was a screen name that I used briefly).

I got hit with a nasty cold, so I am taking some time off until I get better. This one is dragging on like it doesn't know that I have better things to do.

My next step is to trim the tops and veneer the bottoms.
Then comes the front baffles.
Somewhere in there, I still need to make the crossover boards, which I meant to do earlier, but things came up and that part got set aside.
I also need to make stands.

What you see in the last photo is exactly where things sit right now.
Stupid colds.

BeerParty 04-01-2012 12:24 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post

I got hit with a nasty cold, so I am taking some time off until I get better.

Hope you feel better soon, PI.

That veneer on the curved cabinets is looking fabulous. Don't rush the finishing; if you are not feeling well and push yourself you are more likely to make a mistake.

PassingInterest 04-01-2012 01:49 PM

Thanks, Chris. I am definitely taking it easy until this cold is gone.

PassingInterest 04-04-2012 10:53 AM

I'm still not 100% over this cold, but I'm back in the saddle again.

Trim the tops.




Veneer the bottoms.


PassingInterest 04-05-2012 06:46 PM

Plane some Ash.




Flat.




Trim one edge.




I ran some errands and ran out of time, so that's as far as I got and I just now realized that I neglected to take any shots of the cabs as they are now, after sanding the tops and bottoms. I'll get a shot or two of that tomorrow.

tuxedocivic 04-05-2012 07:00 PM

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You must have a bunch of Ash stored up. Making stands?

LTD02 04-05-2012 08:23 PM

have you considered making an instructional video or two? seems like each step could be made into a short vid. there is just so much wisdom in your work, a pic or two just doesn't seem to do it justice.

PassingInterest 04-06-2012 04:07 AM

TuxedoCivic--I'm actually working on the front baffles. I wish I had gotten more of the Ash than I did. I don't have much of it left.

LTD02--You're very kind, thanks. I don't have a video camera.
My biggest challenge in posting is determining the right amount of detail to include. I worry about droning on in words and photos with too much detail and boring everyone to tears, yet I want to provide enough information to be useful to others. I may have skimped a bit too much with my previous post.

maxmercy 04-06-2012 04:30 AM

PI,

You see any of the weather that was out in your parts this past week?

JSS

PassingInterest 04-06-2012 05:03 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmercy View Post

PI,

You see any of the weather that was out in your parts this past week?

JSS

Thanks for asking.

We were unharmed and our property undamaged, but a tornado did some real damage right here in Forney (Dallas area), just about 5 miles from our house.

We saw some footage of another tornado from the same storm in Dallas that lifted up several big-rig trailers hundreds of feet into the air and another that embedded several fence pickets into a sheetrock wall in someone's home. Those were F2s. The one that tore-up Forney was an F3, which is even worse. I forget how many tornadoes were the official count from that storm in the Dallas area, but it was more than a dozen. It is a miracle that nobody died in all that. My wife knows someone who just recently started working and had the kids in daycare, so nobody was home when the tornado hit. Only a bare slab remains where their house once stood. There are many stories like that.

djkest 04-06-2012 08:11 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post

My biggest challenge in posting is determining the right amount of detail to include. I worry about droning on in words and photos with too much detail and boring everyone to tears, yet I want to provide enough information to be useful to others. I may have skimped a bit too much with my previous post.

I only speak for myself but more pictures and more details is always a good thing. I've learned a lot from reading posts from people such as yourself.

PassingInterest 04-06-2012 09:42 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

I only speak for myself but more pictures and more details is always a good thing. I've learned a lot from reading posts from people such as yourself.

Thanks, Dan. I'll try to include more detail.


Here's how they are looking so far--dusty fingerprints and all.




Re-saw the Ash.






Internal stresses have changed within the board after getting re-sawn and now they are cupped. Make sure you plan for that and you'll be okay. Placing a clamp at one edge makes it a bit more obvious how much the boards cupped.


PassingInterest 04-07-2012 11:52 AM

I like the way the one on the right looks.
The one on the left, I'd like to move the pattern in the middle of each board closer together, by trimming an inch from each.




Then I trimmed some waste from the outer edges.
By getting some waste off, the now narrower boards have much less cupping and will need much less material removal to make them flat, which will keep them thicker.




Getting set up.




Here is a before shot. In a moment, I'll flip it over and joint a flat reference face on this board.




I haven't powered on yet--just wanted to show you the small amount of cupping I want to remove, to make this board flat. You can see a gap beneath the level at the outer edges and you can see a gap in the center at the table. The crown (peak) is up and that is how I will feed the board through the jointer.




I'm only taking off 1/32" with each pass, so it will probably take 2 or 3 passes to get a flat reference face.




After 2 passes, I am really close.




After the third pass, you can now clearly see that I have some cross-grain figure in the wood, which I can enhance later, with some honey-amber Trans-Tint dye, which will also give the wood some warmth in appearance.


PassingInterest 04-07-2012 12:03 PM

Next, I want to joint an edge on each board and since this is for joinery, I want to joint the middle edge for each. The outer edges will just get trimmed off later. You can also see a line that runs the length of each board, which is an indication that it is time for me to replace the blades.




Keep the reference face pressed firmly against the fence during the next step.




Each board now has one good face and one good edge and they sit flat on the table and tight against each other.
The burnt area on the edge of the one board was caused by the cupped board rocking during the cut at the miter saw.
I should have put the crown up at the saw. It would have been more stable.




Let me back up a moment.
The design down the center of each board appears to move away from each other toward the bottom, which I didn't care for very much.




By swapping them from side to side, each board's center pattern appears to flow toward each other and I think that looks better, which is why I was careful to joint the proper edge for each.


Woodfiend 04-07-2012 12:14 PM

Looking good!!

PassingInterest 04-07-2012 12:29 PM

I sometimes use the shop vac on the surface planer.




This is why I like the cyclonic action of the Dust Deputy. I have filled and emptied the 5 gallon bucket many times without even looking into the shop vac and here you can see that not much gets through to the shop vac at all.




This is the advantage of a cyclone. I used to have to clean out the filter before ever filling the shop vac even once. You know the filter is clogged when you loose all your suction. As it is now, I haven't even checked the filter in months and it doesn't need cleaning, still.




I don't know if this helps anyone or not, but I just used 4 cleats to secure the shop vac to the wheeled platform.




The Dust Deputy came with 2 buckets. I think most people secure one bucket to their platform and stick the second bucket in it. I used a twist-lock approach.






The 2 wood tabs were installed with a slight twist to them (angled), so they easily slip into the locks when I twist the bucket.




You generate a lot of chips and dust when you joint or plane a face.
Sawdust is good for the dirt in your yard. You can use it during planting, for instance.
If you dispose of it on trash pickup day--bag it, so the trash collectors don't get your sawdust blown into their eyes.




I planed one face of each board, taking 1/32" off of each in a single pass only and filled the bucket 1/3 full. It was empty to start with.


PassingInterest 04-07-2012 12:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodfiend View Post

Looking good!!

Thanks, man!


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