Using spikes on sub enclosuer - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 8 Old 06-20-2007, 04:07 PM - Thread Starter
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Are there any reasons that you don't see many people using spikes on there sub enclosures to help prevent vibration transmissions to the floor.

I would like to use them on my next DIY build am just curious if they are a bad idea on subs.
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post #2 of 8 Old 06-20-2007, 04:37 PM
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Probably because spikes don't prevent vibration. They couple the sub to the floor, making the problem worse.

You want rubber feet, the thicker the better.

*edit* To clarify, spikes prevent the enclosure itself from vibrating, or at least reduce it. That can be helpful for speakers, but usually not subs. Generally you want to decouple the sub from the floor, so that it doesn't transmit vibrations into the floorboards. That can cause the whole floor to become a huge speaker, smearing the bass sounds. So you want to put the sub on a shock absorber of some sort so that it doesn't pound the floor.

The sub enclosure itself should be rigid enough that vibration isn't an issue. If it buzzes and rattles it wasn't built well.
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post #3 of 8 Old 06-20-2007, 05:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WallyWest View Post

Probably because spikes don't prevent vibration. They couple the sub to the floor, making the problem worse.

You want rubber feet, the thicker the better.

*edit* To clarify, spikes prevent the enclosure itself from vibrating, or at least reduce it. That can be helpful for speakers, but usually not subs. Generally you want to decouple the sub from the floor, so that it doesn't transmit vibrations into the floorboards. That can cause the whole floor to become a huge speaker, smearing the bass sounds. So you want to put the sub on a shock absorber of some sort so that it doesn't pound the floor.

The sub enclosure itself should be rigid enough that vibration isn't an issue. If it buzzes and rattles it wasn't built well.

Does this apply to more solid floors? I have carpet over cement in my apt and I am planning on using floor spikes.
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post #4 of 8 Old 06-20-2007, 05:47 PM
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I have wood floors and always see these spikes with a metal saucer that the spike is supposed to sit in... it always seems like such a stupid idea, resonation city. Maybe the metal saucer is a fluke and the saucer is supposed to be rubber... that would make sense...
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post #5 of 8 Old 06-20-2007, 06:59 PM
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The saucer is just to prevent the spikes from marking a wood floor IIRC. My experience with spikes wasn't so good, the bottom portion of the spikes themselves were a source of vibration (these were the two peice kind, you attach the top portion of the spike then screw the bottom portion-the part that actually tapers down to a point-to the top portion).
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post #6 of 8 Old 06-20-2007, 08:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spudfrog View Post

Does this apply to more solid floors? I have carpet over cement in my apt and I am planning on using floor spikes.

The part about the sub bouncing the floorboards is only an issue with a somewhat flexible floor. Mine is a second story room in an old house, the floor is almost like a trampoline. That's a worst case scenario. Concrete floors, you'd have to have one hell of a sub to make that flex.

The only time I would be tempted to use spikes is on heavy, spongy carpet. And then only for the main speakers. The sub is too heavy to be affected by the carpet.
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post #7 of 8 Old 06-21-2007, 02:54 PM
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I picked up 4 of these 1 1/2" (If I remember correctly) off of eBay. They worked perfectly for my sealed RLP15.

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post #8 of 8 Old 06-21-2007, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WallyWest View Post

The part about the sub bouncing the floorboards is only an issue with a somewhat flexible floor. Mine is a second story room in an old house, the floor is almost like a trampoline.


scary!
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