Building an IR 12v Trigger Controller - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 4Likes
  • 2 Post By Stoopalini
  • 2 Post By Stoopalini
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 03-24-2016, 09:24 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Stoopalini's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 95
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Building an IR 12v Trigger Controller

I've been looking for a decent solution for controlling 12v triggers using my Harmony Ultimate remote, and haven't found anything readily available for a reasonable price; so decided to build one.

When searching for something, I came across many Google results where others were searching for the same thing, but never did find anything either. So I thought I would make a thread to document how I'm doing this, in case others would like to do it themselves.

Here are the parts I am using. All bought from Amazon, with Prime 2-day shipping, for a total cost of $35.31


And here is a rough mockup of what I am building:



In the end, I should have a box with a 12v wall wart input, and 4 individual trigger outs which can be turned on/off with independent IR commands.

The parts have been ordered, and expected delivery is tomorrow. If there's interest in this project, I'll continue to update the post as I build the box.

krholmberg and Krobar like this.

DiSH 722k / PS3 / Apple TV / Wii
Emotiva UMC-200
JBL Performance AVA7 / Mitsubishi DA-A10 / Carver a-400x / Adcom GFA-545
NHT VT-1.2a / NHT VS-1.2a / NHT Superones / Sonotube Sub
Vizio M602i-B3 / Dell 5100MP
Stoopalini is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 03-28-2016, 12:57 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Stoopalini's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 95
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Well, I got this all setup and in a project box, with four 1/8" female jacks and the power jack. I also had to drill an additional hole for the IR sensor, and it works great!

The only challenge I had is the programming of the Harmony Ultimate. The IR relay board came with a remote I used to teach the IR codes to the Harmony, but it doesn't have discrete on/off IR codes. So it uses the same code to turn trigger 1 on and off; as well as for the other 3 relays. But, the remote also has a "power all" button. This button turns all 4 triggers on if none are currently on, or turns all 4 off if 1 or more are already on.

So for programming the Harmony, in order to get the DIY trigger controller into a known state, I have the harmony send a trigger 4 command, then a power all command. This powers all 4 channels off, and gets me into a known state. It works for me because trigger 4 will never be the only trigger powered on in any scenario. If is was the only trigger powered on, then sending a trigger 4 command and a power all command, would turn all 4 triggers on.

So I now have my system setup to when an activity is chosen, the amps stay off and everything else powers up. Then I have a macro (or sequence as Harmony calls it) assigned to a button on the remote which goes into the TV's menu and toggles the TV speakers on/off. So I've trained the kids, and my wife, to use this macro button if they don't hear any sound. Then when I want the full system, I press the macro button to toggle the TV speakers off, and then I've mapped a button on the Harmony to turn trigger one on (which feeds a trigger controlled power strip to which the amps are plugged in to).

And the "off" command of the harmony always sends the power off sequence to the trigger box.

For $35, this is a very sensible solution for an IR controlled 12v trigger controller.





krholmberg and ELECTRICDON like this.

DiSH 722k / PS3 / Apple TV / Wii
Emotiva UMC-200
JBL Performance AVA7 / Mitsubishi DA-A10 / Carver a-400x / Adcom GFA-545
NHT VT-1.2a / NHT VS-1.2a / NHT Superones / Sonotube Sub
Vizio M602i-B3 / Dell 5100MP

Last edited by Stoopalini; 03-28-2016 at 01:00 PM.
Stoopalini is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 04-11-2018, 03:40 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Krobar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3,171
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
Liked: 98
Thanks for posting this info, I'm just finishing up an RS232 controlled version using a $10 Ebay 4 Relay controller.

What are the ports that you are daisy chaining in the mockup diagram? I have done an initial wireup and sorted the RS232 hex protocol and it works but the relays seem to do the mirror opposite of what I expect.

I daisy chained the +12V from the supply to each of the "NO" Ports and then connected ground to each of the "COM" ports; is this correct?

Last edited by Krobar; 04-11-2018 at 03:55 PM.
Krobar is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 Old 04-11-2018, 07:45 PM
Senior Member
 
mbarland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 411
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Liked: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krobar View Post
I daisy chained the +12V from the supply to each of the "NO" Ports and then connected ground to each of the "COM" ports; is this correct?
Take a look at the photo above, cause it demonstrates how to wire it. Pick a leg you want to switch (either 12v or GND, I prefer to switch the hot side). Run the ground to all your sockets. Run the 12v to the common terminal on the relay. Then wire the NO or NC to the hot side of your socket.

The way you're doing it is shorting it out when the relay closes. Good way to release the magic smoke.
mbarland is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 04-12-2018, 01:14 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Krobar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3,171
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
Liked: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbarland View Post
Take a look at the photo above, cause it demonstrates how to wire it. Pick a leg you want to switch (either 12v or GND, I prefer to switch the hot side). Run the ground to all your sockets. Run the 12v to the common terminal on the relay. Then wire the NO or NC to the hot side of your socket.

The way you're doing it is shorting it out when the relay closes. Good way to release the magic smoke.
Thanks for the description, I think I understand. So just daisy chain +12V through each of the Com and run each NO back to ground? Photo was not of much use because the terminals are all labelled in Chinese.
Krobar is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 04-12-2018, 07:21 AM
Senior Member
 
mbarland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 411
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Liked: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krobar View Post
Thanks for the description, I think I understand. So just daisy chain +12V through each of the Com and run each NO back to ground? Photo was not of much use because the terminals are all labelled in Chinese.
No. Think of a relay like a switch. It has a power in, and two power outs. The relay/switch has two possible positions. On-On. Common is the power in and NO and NC are the two possible switch positions. The photo above shows the universal symbols for how a relay operates. The symbols look like the first attached image.

The relevant portion is on the right of this diagram. The middle lead is common, with the top NC and the bottom NO. The middle line has the kink in it going to the top to show that is the default position of the "switch". So it flops back and forth.

Attached is an example of how the relay should be wired. It's the same for an AC or a DC load. The relay is just a toggle switch.

In this example, the relay's common is the middle terminal, the NC is on the left, and NO is on the right. So the Arduino triggers the relay to close the NO side, turning on the light.

This would be the same if you're going to wire a 12v trigger or an LED. It's easier to conceptualize with a light bulb or LED. Run ground direct from your power source to the ground side of the LED, then use the relay to toggle the hot side. So daisy chain the positive to all the common on the relays, and then use the NO output on the relay to feed the positive side of the LED.

Since the relay is just a switch, running positive into the common and then out to ground on the relay outputs will just create a short. Ground doesn't go to the relays at all, except for the relay board's own power inputs. In the diagram I posted with the Arduino, you can see the relay board itself is powered by the Arduino through the breadboard.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	RElay.png
Views:	29
Size:	4.6 KB
ID:	2388960   Click image for larger version

Name:	5v_relay_sm.png
Views:	65
Size:	25.7 KB
ID:	2388962  
mbarland is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 04-12-2018, 02:23 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Krobar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3,171
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
Liked: 98
Hi Mbarland,

Just wanted to say thank you for taking the time to explain this. Still waiting on some serial cables but I'm finally clear on the wiring.
Krobar is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 04-12-2018, 08:26 PM
Senior Member
 
mbarland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 411
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Liked: 54
No problem. Once you start down this DIY hardware hacking, you'll find uses for it all over the place. :-)

For example, I used relay boards like this wired into magnetic reed sensors on closet doors to toggle LED strips that I tacked around the entire door opening. Now when you open the closet door, the light strip comes on immediately and the closet is bathed in light.
mbarland is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 05-23-2018, 03:47 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Killroy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Ninth Circle of Hell
Posts: 2,578
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 628 Post(s)
Liked: 501
I needed a trigger for my anamorphic lens sled and I wanted to thank you for this DIY thread. I got a single channel relay board since I only need one trigger. I had a small hiccup with the wires for the trigger jack but with a little trial & error I figured out where they went.

Thanks again.
Killroy is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 09:24 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked: 1
Does anyone know how I would get Ip control of individual 12v triggers? I want to be able to select individual amps to turn on and off depending on my desires.

Living room HT
Front channels...3 Klipsch RP160Ms, 4 RP150Ms surrounds,Yamaha CXA5100, 2 Dune HD PRO, 2 Yamaha p2500s, 2 Nobsound 50wpc, UnRaid, APC HT power center, Pioneer bluray player, PS3, XBOX ONE,
Xilica xp4080 crossover
NBPk402 is offline  
post #11 of 11 Old 01-10-2020, 03:47 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
AV_Integrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Northern, VA - Washington, DC
Posts: 6,695
Mentioned: 102 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1677 Post(s)
Liked: 1213
Quote:
Originally Posted by NBPk402 View Post
Does anyone know how I would get Ip control of individual 12v triggers? I want to be able to select individual amps to turn on and off depending on my desires.
Seems like you could get a board like this one and plug it into an Arduino then add 12v power supplies as necessary for as many amps as you need to control...
https://www.sainsmart.com/products/1...v-relay-module

AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology installation in the Washington DC metro area.
AV_Integrated is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Home Automation

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off