The Importance of Ultra HD HDR - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 06:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Exclamation The Importance of Ultra HD HDR

High Dynamic Range (HDR), combined with a wider color gamut (WCG), is probably the single most important and exciting advancement in picture quality in the last 10 to 15 years and single most important part of the new UHD (Ultra High Definition) standard, with the increase in resolution, from HD 2K (1080p) to UHD 4K (2160p), being much less important.

High Dynamic Range is far more noticeable (even on smaller screen sizes and from greater distances) than a simple increase in resolution.

“In essence, HDR is about brighter whites and deeper blacks, and more details in each end.” It is about brighter more detailed “specular highlights” and darker blacks with more “shadow detail”.

UHD HDR is also about brighter, richer, more saturated colors. It is about more shades of color or Color Depth – from 10-bit to 12-bit color – and a wider color palette or Color Space – from DCI P3 (Digital Cinema Initiative) to Recommendation ITU-R BT.2020 (which, incidentally, also specifies both 4K and 8K resolutions and a higher 120Hz refresh rate).

“UHD HDR is about trying to reproduce the world around us as accurately, realistically, and detailed as possible on a display.” But viewing HDR content, of course, requires an HDR capable Ultra HD TV or projector.

For a more in-depth description of HDR, click on the links below:

HDR (High Dynamic Range) on TVs explained

What is HDR for TVs, and why should you care?


HDR Content Distribution

Most of the Ultra HD HDR content currently available is only available through streaming media (primarily through TV-installed apps). And from the looks of things, streaming will continue being the most popular and widely available option for viewing UHD HDR content, at least for the foreseeable future.

One of the reasons for this is that our viewing habits have shifted from watching “scheduled programming” on weeknights to “binge-watching” on weekends. Media services have now adapted to our schedules, instead of the other way around. Plus, streaming is much less expensive and far more convenient than other options.

However, there are still a lot of other obstacles to overcome as well, such as internet download speeds (and data caps), network bottlenecks, old hardware along the data pipeline, multiple devices connected to your home network, and so on.

Additionally, the high bandwidth requirement of a 4K UHD feed, which is two to three times that of a 1080p HD feed, will require that the broadcast industry, in order to handle live broadcasts in 4K UHD, reorganizes its infrastructure and updates its hardware – something that requires not only a significant capital investment, but also time.

However, they will get there eventually, probably sooner than later, especially where Satellite TV is concerned. Now, how many of those live broadcasts, if any, will actually include HDR content? Well that still remains to be seen.

Paul O’Donovan, principal research analyst at Gartner Inc., says, “I think satellite will explode with a wealth of 4K content very soon, around the globe. It’s not an issue of bandwidth or capacity, it’s more to do with adding or replacing equipment along the distribution channel. This is more expensive for cable operators and for network TV companies than it is for satellite pay-TV operators or Internet-delivery systems.”

Most Satellite TV content providers, such as DirecTV (see link below), as well as some Cable TV content providers, such as Comcast, will gradually and slowly start coming on board over the next few years.

DirecTV Ramps Up For the 4K Revolution

See also:

Why broadcast Ultra HD via satellite?

Japan's Cable TV to Start 4k Broadcasting

Pulling in a 4K/UHD HDR signal over-the-air (OTA) should also be possible, but it will more than likely take a few more years for it to happen, if it ever happens at all.

There is a proposed standard that's currently in development (ATSC 3.0) that promises more efficient use of the broadcast spectrum, greater interactivity, UHD HDR video and better compatibility with mobile devices (See links below). However, since ATSC 3.0 isn’t backwards-compatible with the current ATSC tuners/receivers in today’s TV sets, it would require the purchase of a new TV.

High Dynamic Range Planned for ATSC 3.0

The World's First HDR UHD Live, Over-the-Air Broadcast


Ultra HD Blu-ray Players and DVDs

One thing that has both me, and many others on the forum, most excited about UHD HDR, is the soon to be released Ultra HD Blu-ray Player and discs (due to come out the first quarter of 2016).

Yes, they will probably be on the expensive side initially, and yes, they will be probably appeal mostly to a “niche” market. But UHD Blu-rays will offer noticeably superior picture quality to that of either steaming or broadcast media, or that of current Blu-rays.

The new format will allow for a wider colour gamut (WCG) and a higher bit rate, it will also support both high dynamic range (HDR) and higher frame rates (HFR). Ultra HD Blu-ray will also support the new object-based audio formats which include Dolby Atmos and DTS:X.

Additionally, with an optional digital bridge feature, the specifications allow content purchases to be viewed by consumers across a range of in-home and mobile devices. The Ultra HD Blu-ray discs themselves have a capacity of 66GB and 100GB of data on dual and triple layer discs respectively.

The specification also mandates that all new Ultra HD Blu-ray players will be capable of playing back existing Full HD Blu-rays and SD DVDs, which means that you can still enjoy your current library of discs.

The Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) has mandated that any Ultra HD Blu-ray disc always start from a generic (SMPTE BT 2084 standard) HDR10 base layer (which requires an HDMI 2.0a input) and, if the content provider so desires, a proprietary Dolby Vision layer can then ride on top of that.

Stated differently, all Ultra HD Blu-rays will include basic HDR10 metadata while some will add Dolby Vision HDR metadata that will ride on top of the basic layer.


Currently Available HDR Titles

To view a list of currently available HDR titles, check out this thread:
(Started and maintained by another forum member “ray0414”)

Master List of currently available 4k HDR titles, updated often


Please feel free to post any additional info you might want to share.

Any and all “related” comments or questions are welcomed.

You can talk about any news, updates, or other interesting info on the subject of UHD HDR TVs, DVDs, Blu-ray players, or available content (don’t forget to also visit the 4K HDR thread mentioned above).

Thank You!

Richard

Last edited by King Richard; 12-07-2015 at 07:00 AM.
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post #2 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 07:41 AM
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“In essence, HDR is about brighter whites and deeper blacks, and more details in each end.” It is about brighter more detailed “specular highlights” and darker blacks with more “shadow detail”.


This will work very good with OLED then. Already have blacks that LCD cannot compete with.

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post #3 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 07:53 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viper32 View Post
“In essence, HDR is about brighter whites and deeper blacks, and more details in each end.” It is about brighter more detailed “specular highlights” and darker blacks with more “shadow detail”.

This will work very good with OLED then. Already have blacks that LCD cannot compete with.

Yes, however, an OLED TV cannot get nearly as bright as an LED LCD TV (especially the latest high-end TVs).

Although, I have heard that they are making some improvements on that front. But they will never be able to get anywhere near the brightness of LCD TVs.

Additionally, running an OLED TV too bright will most likely shorten its lifespan.

Lets just hope they will be able to sort out all these issues with future OLED TVs as they are certainly exceptional TVs.

Richard

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post #4 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 08:17 AM
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this sounds great on my eg9600 if i could actually see it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Richard View Post
Yes, however, an OLED TV cannot get nearly as bright as an LED LCD TV (especially the latest high-end TVs).

Although, I have heard that they are making some improvements on that front. But they will never be able to get anywhere near the brightness of LCD TVs.

Additionally, running an OLED TV too bright will most likely shorten its lifespan.

Lets just hope they will be able to sort out all these issues with future OLED TVs as they are certainly exceptional TVs.

Richard

my oled gets super bright with deep colors while doing it. no lcd can do that.
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post #5 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 09:48 AM
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This is going to degenerate into a LCD vs OLED technology debate, already a 1000 threads like this.

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post #6 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mozy View Post
this sounds great on my eg9600 if i could actually see it.
my oled gets super bright with deep colors while doing it. no lcd can do that.
The issue with HDR and OLED isn't how bright it can get but that OLED always uses ABL or Automatic Brightness Limiter. This varies the luminosity of the screen depending on the content. The brighter the picture to display the darker the colors will be. So when the screen really should be bright because that HDR content is trying to show a really bright highlight(think midday sun reflecting off a car window for example) you will get a lower brightness level than if it was showing a night time scene where more of the screen was dark. This ABL technology will continually clash with HDR and there's no way to turn it off. One of the much touted features of HDR is to get really bright highlights. I don't know if it will be a big deal for everyone, but it's something to be aware of when discussing HDR where most folks are probably using LED sets.

HDR and WCG are the two biggest factors for video going forward. Resolution is nice but to have super bright highlights and better contrast with a larger range of colors to display, movies can begin to look more life like and display something closer to what we would see if we were right there in the action. Even the early HDR titles from Amazon, Sony, and Fox really are impressive in that regard.

Last edited by cmdrdredd; 12-07-2015 at 03:14 PM.
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post #7 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by chunon View Post
This is going to degenerate into a LCD vs OLED technology debate, already a 1000 threads like this.
Lol, I could tell from not even clicking on the thread.
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post #8 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 05:25 PM
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Another HDR thread in the LCD forum, the mods should do some housekeeping soon.
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post #9 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 07:25 PM
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Yeah, we have enough. Closed.

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