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post #631 of 662 Old 07-05-2019, 07:20 PM
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Restrictions on MediaLight? What does that even mean? Netflix? YouTube? Huh?

Our lights are non-reactive. They are ISF-certified video white. Nothing in our line is any other color, so I’m not sure where you are thinking that there are restrictions.

Not sure why DreamScreen is not available in the USA, but the color changing lights have come and gone many times over while companies like Ideal-Lume from CinemaQuest, Inc. have stayed true to industry standards and are what we try to emulate.

That said, colored lights can be fun and can look cool and I know some pros who use them as accent lighting, but they turn them off when they are viewing color critical content. They aren’t intended for prolonged, everyday viewing.

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post #632 of 662 Old 07-05-2019, 08:48 PM
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Restrictions on MediaLight? What does that even mean? Netflix? YouTube? Huh?

Our lights are non-reactive. They are ISF-certified video white. Nothing in our line is any other color, so I’m not sure where you are thinking that there are restrictions.

Not sure why DreamScreen is not available in the USA, but the color changing lights have come and gone many times over while companies like Ideal-Lume from CinemaQuest, Inc. have stayed true to industry standards and are what we try to emulate.

That said, colored lights can be fun and can look cool and I know some pros who use them as accent lighting, but they turn them off when they are viewing color critical content. They aren’t intended for prolonged, everyday viewing.
Sorry, I didn't mean to type MediaLight. I was cutting and pasting and made a mistake. I meant to type Dream Color and was talking about restrictions of DreamColor listed on Amazon. I corrected my original post.

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post #633 of 662 Old 07-05-2019, 09:13 PM
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Are you looking for an accent light that changes colors with the content being displayed? That's not bias lighting. MediaLight has no restrictions that I know of. I use them on both of my HTS's.
Sorry, I didn't mean to type MediaLight. I was cutting and pasting and made a mistake. I meant to type Dream Color and was talking about restrictions of DreamColor listed on Amazon. I corrected my original post.
I am looking for something that can do both color changing and and also having high quality white light like MediaLight has, to reduce my eye strain in dark room and to improve the perception of the blacks.

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post #634 of 662 Old 07-05-2019, 09:37 PM
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Sorry, I didn't mean to type MediaLight. I was cutting and pasting and made a mistake. I meant to type Dream Color and was talking about restrictions of DreamColor listed on Amazon. I corrected my original post.
I am looking for something that can do both color changing and and also having high quality white light like MediaLight has, to reduce my eye strain in dark room and to improve the perception of the blacks.
One other thing you could consider is the Philips Hue Play lights; keep in mind those require a base station too, but they work very well and depending on your setup don't require mounting on the TV itself. There's no exact 6500K option in the app (although some are close), but you can input your own image to duplicate, and I was able to find a 6500K sample that worked great. I was torn between Hues and a more standard LED strip-type light with my last TV upgrade. Decided on the Hue Play and have no regrets - these should last me a long time.
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post #635 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 02:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Scenic Labs View Post

Not sure why DreamScreen is not available in the USA, but the color changing lights have come and gone many times over while companies like Ideal-Lume from CinemaQuest, Inc. have stayed true to industry standards and are what we try to emulate.

That said, colored lights can be fun and can look cool and I know some pros who use them as accent lighting, but they turn them off when they are viewing color critical content. They aren’t intended for prolonged, everyday viewing.
Thank you for warning me. You are absolutely right that the color changing lights companies have "come and gone many times over". I just found out that they went out of business.
I am glad I was not able to buy the DreamScreen product. Soon the app will not work property after the phones upgrade the firmware. I feel bad for the consumers that spent money on this product. I also found out that it had a feature that displayed static colors including white like a bias lighting which answered my original question. Now if I can find a similar product that can both change colors and have the bias light options.

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post #636 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 09:05 AM
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Here's a professional grading and editing suite that mixes accurate MediaLights with color-changing RGB. Here is their twitter. They turn the colored lights on when they are showing the suite to clients or creating a mood, but they turn them off when they are doing serious viewing.

I used to be staunchly opposed to colored lights, but then after raising a couple of kids and turning on blue lights (not behind the set as I'm not a complete animal lol) to set a mood for their "Finding Nemo" viewings, now my view is similar to what I've heard Joe Kane say about other non-reference technologies like Darbeevision (which also sort of fizzled out); "it's fine as long as you can turn it off."




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Thank you for warning me. You are absolutely right that the color changing lights companies have "come and gone many times over". I just found out that they went out of business.
I am glad I was not able to buy the DreamScreen product. Soon the app will not work property after the phones upgrade the firmware. I feel bad for the consumers that spent money on this product. I also found out that it had a feature that displayed static colors including white like a bias lighting which answered my original question. Now if I can find a similar product that can both change colors and have the bias light options.
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post #637 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 11:12 AM
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One other thing you could consider is the Philips Hue Play lights; keep in mind those require a base station too, but they work very well and depending on your setup don't require mounting on the TV itself. There's no exact 6500K option in the app (although some are close), but you can input your own image to duplicate, and I was able to find a 6500K sample that worked great. I was torn between Hues and a more standard LED strip-type light with my last TV upgrade. Decided on the Hue Play and have no regrets - these should last me a long time.
Very nice product but isn't it too small behind 85 inch TV? there will be many gaps.

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post #638 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 11:44 AM
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Here's a professional grading and editing suite that mixes accurate MediaLights with color-changing RGB. Here is their twitter. They turn the colored lights on when they are showing the suite to clients or creating a mood, but they turn them off when they are doing serious viewing.

I used to be staunchly opposed to colored lights, but then after raising a couple of kids and turning on blue lights (not behind the set as I'm not a complete animal lol) to set a mood for their "Finding Nemo" viewings, now my view is similar to what I've heard Joe Kane say about other non-reference technologies like Darbeevision (which also sort of fizzled out); "it's fine as long as you can turn it off."

Thank you. Good idea to have two separate systems. I agree with "it's fine as long as you can turn it off." advise. I don't want my family and guests to have an epileptic attack after binge watching shows with changing color lights. But it will be nice for on screen music effects behind my 85 inch TV wall. I can adjust the distance from the wall by moving my BDI credenza which is also deep enough to move the TV too. What is the recommended distance for the MediaLights? This is my setup in the living room 12'' from the wall.

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post #639 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 12:51 PM
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Just found this thread and I have a few stupid questions -

- I always watch tv in the dark and never really had eye strain, in fact if an extra light is on like the kitchen (I'm in an apartment) it annoys me
- if bias lighting is better for your eyes and better for contrast why don't cinemas use it, and why don't I ever see this in the 'HT of the month' and other similar theaters
- any opinions on this - https://www.amazon.com/Luminoodle-TV...dp/B076X89GRW?
- What if I don't want an led strip. Hard to install and it may peel off. Is there a simple lamp I can plug in and keep behind the tv?
These "sticky" threads in the 'Display Calibration' section of the forum should help your understanding of this topic:


'D65 Video Bias Lighting- Fundamental Theory And Practice'
https://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/show....php?t=1162578


'How Viewing Environment Conditions Can Corrupt Or Enhance Your Calibration'
https://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=849430


Here are answers to your questions:


Sensitivity to eye strain and viewing fatigue varies from one person to another. When tasked with the challenge of composing standards and recommended practices for the video industry, the Society of Motion Picture and Television engineers settled on what applies to most humans. You may be less sensitive than other viewers, but there are other variables potentially at play. These may include how bright peak white is on your TV, viewing distance, vertical viewing angle, etc. I have found over the two decades of working in this field that people repeatedly comment on how much more relaxed their eyes feel when first trying bias lighting. They were suffering from some eye strain and viewing fatigue but didn't realize it. Any ambient light in a viewing environment should only come from behing the screen to avoid contamination of the image. Adjacent rooms, such as your kitchen, are a fairly common problem in this regard.


Cinemas don't use bias lighting because screen brightness is substantially lower than televisions. Most "HT of the Month" features are also projection theaters, plus there is no shortage of ignorance among designers of video viewing environments, both among hobbyists and consumer electronics professionals and salespeople.


The "Luminoodle" issue was aptly responded to by Jason Rosenfeld a few posts back.


For a simple, portable, self-contained, durable bias light product, look at the Ideal-Lume Standard LED.


The following quote should be understood by anyone attempting to design a correct video system:


"The creation of television images that are intended to follow a standard of consistency in reproduction requires definition of a reference display, of a controlled viewing environment, and of a set of measurement procedures to enable consistent calibration of both display and environment. This document specifies a controlled viewing environment referred to as the Reference Viewing Environment." (Introductory remarks from-SMPTE ST 2080-3:2017 'Reference Viewing Environment for Evaluation of HDTV Images' )


Best regards and beautiful pictures,
G. Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
SMPTE, Professional Video Alliance, THX, ISF, Digital Cinema Society
www.CinemaQuestInc.com



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post #640 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 01:26 PM
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Philips Hue Play

I have an 85" Sony 950G and I have 3 Hue Play's as constant backlighting (no gimmicky trying to change colors with the TV) just bright daylight color (I wish you could just plug in 6500, but with the color palette I picked brightest white and called it TV. I wish they had a default setting for 6500). I'm very happy as it boosts the contrast and reduces eye strain as intended. Added bonus as I walk down my basement stairs I tell Alexa to turn on the tv and and to turn on the tv lights and everything fires up. Sweet, no remotes needed to turn my stuff on. I used the Harmony Elite for any changes needed or to start playing the UHD disc, change TV station, etc.
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post #641 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 01:34 PM
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I have an 85" Sony 950G and I have 3 Hue Play's as constant backlighting (no gimmicky trying to change colors with the TV) just bright daylight color (I wish you could just plug in 6500, but with the color palette I picked brightest white and called it TV. I wish they had a default setting for 6500). I'm very happy as it boosts the contrast and reduces eye strain as intended. Added bonus as I walk down my basement stairs I tell Alexa to turn on the tv and and to turn on the tv lights and everything fires up. Sweet, no remotes needed to turn my stuff on. I used the Harmony Elite for any changes needed or to start playing the UHD disc, change TV station, etc.
You are in abundant company on this and most other home entertainment discussion forums. Convenience trumps accurate reproduction for many hobbyists, especially their spouses. As I find frequently noteworthy, popularity and validity are not mutually inclusive!
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post #642 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 02:18 PM
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I agree with GeorgeAB.

Many of the people on forums of this sort value image accuracy, calibration and viewing in an ideal environment.

You wouldn't want to put a colored or inaccurate light behind a calibrated display because you'd alter the perceived colors of the display.

As for price, I really think that products like Ideal-Lume (and MediaLight) are cheaper in the long run than some of the commodity brands -- both have 5 year warranties versus no years or 1 year tops, and if you've trawled the internet for cheap LED strips, as I have doing research, you'll nod in agreement that longevity often isn't a strong point. But, beyond the price, to have them actually conform to standards is key. So, I usually question if it's cheaper to get something that doesn't do what it's suppose to do.

I do have skin in the game here but you can objectively measure both Ideal-Lume and MediaLight. I like to paraphrase Joel Silver from ISF. "Everyone has opinions about home cinema but we have standards."

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You are in abundant company on this and most other home entertainment discussion forums. Convenience trumps accurate reproduction for many hobbyists, especially their spouses. As I find frequently noteworthy, popularity and validity are not mutually inclusive!
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post #643 of 662 Old 07-06-2019, 07:13 PM
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Very nice product but isn't it too small behind 85 inch TV? there will be many gaps.
I'm using a 75", and for me personally, no. I was actually surprised expecting the need to buy a third light (it's expandable so that's an option if you need more), but the two sit on my AV stand behind the TV and provide plenty of light for my situation. Much more than a ribbon style produced on my old 65", and it's adjustable. To get to 10% of my brightness I only have them set around 25% of output.

Keep in mind this may depend a bit on your setup, etc. Mine is a little unconventional as there's a window in back, so I primarily get light to the sides of the TV as well as a bit underneath and above, but lesser than the sides (no matter what you do). If you just had a flat wall back there, I don't know if any gaps would be apparent, though I don't really think so.
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post #644 of 662 Old 07-28-2019, 07:34 PM
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Just setup the Philips Hue light strips on my Sony 65” Z9F.
Love it! I’m able to set the color temperature to 6500K at about 20% and it is the perfect bias light. Of course I can also choose any color I like. Really helps set the mood for movie watching.
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post #645 of 662 Old 07-28-2019, 07:39 PM
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Wolfepack,
There is a third party app for the Philips Hue called OnSwitch and it has a Home Theater Mode that has a Color Accurate 6500K setting built in. Works perfect!
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post #646 of 662 Old 07-30-2019, 02:20 PM
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Is bias lighting effective at all if it's not 6500k? My wife liked the idea of ambient light behind the TV but she despises that bright white LED light.
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post #647 of 662 Old 07-30-2019, 02:32 PM
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Is bias lighting effective at all if it's not 6500k? My wife liked the idea of ambient light behind the TV but she despises that bright white LED light.
Soft White LED is nice.

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post #648 of 662 Old 07-30-2019, 02:50 PM
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The question to ask yourself is "do I care about having a calibrated display?"

If this means nothing to you, then you are less likely to care about accurate color reproduction and there's no point arguing over the merits of reference standards.

Any color of light will help to reduce eyestrain, but colors other than video white will alter what you see on screen due to chromatic adaptation. In essence, "uncalibrating the display" from the viewer's perspective.

But why is the light behind the TV bright? Reference standards call for a "dim surround." It should not be bright at all for optimal impact. Bright lights will crush blacks too much. Don't you have a dimmer?

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Is bias lighting effective at all if it's not 6500k? My wife liked the idea of ambient light behind the TV but she despises that bright white LED light.
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post #649 of 662 Old 07-30-2019, 03:00 PM
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Well they would have a dual purpose and would have to satisfy both of us. My wife likes some lights on when watching TV but I like it dark. So the bias lighting for her would be just that... Lighting. For me I want to improve the perception of contrast. I recently switched from a Vizio quantum tv to a Sony TV. I loved the contrast of the Vizio and the very deep blacks it provided. The Sony has great picture but the blacks aren't nearly as good and the blooming is distracting so I'm hoping the bias lighting would help with that. So I was wondering if a softer light would still be effective at improving contrast or if it must be 6500k or else it's just ambient lighting that reduces eye strain.
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post #650 of 662 Old 07-30-2019, 03:16 PM
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Eyestrain is reduced with ambient light, but perceived contrast is improved (and, separately, glare is eliminated) when the lights are placed behind the display. Ambient light in the room (not bias lighting behind the display) might mask blooming only inasmuch as it causes glare, which will hide the blooming.

I've had numerous people ask if we could create an accurate 6500K bias light that also changed colors when that was desired. The answer is that we could (I'd never do it under the MediaLight brand, of course. That's purely D65). However, I'm not convinced that people would be willing to pay a premium for RGBW lights that could also be accurate bias lights.

I imagine that an RGBW solution would cost about $100-120 for something similar to our 4m Flex, which sells for $69. It has a very high CRI and super-tight color temp. I wouldn't include color temperature changing white, though, because the blackbody curve for 3000K is so different from the curve for 8,000 that meeting somewhere in the middle would not be accurate and would usually be on the magenta side of the blackbody curve, from my numerous (failed) tests.

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Well they would have a dual purpose and would have to satisfy both of us. My wife likes some lights on when watching TV but I like it dark. So the bias lighting for her would be just that... Lighting. For me I want to improve the perception of contrast. I recently switched from a Vizio quantum tv to a Sony TV. I loved the contrast of the Vizio and the very deep blacks it provided. The Sony has great picture but the blacks aren't nearly as good and the blooming is distracting so I'm hoping the bias lighting would help with that. So I was wondering if a softer light would still be effective at improving contrast or if it must be 6500k or else it's just ambient lighting that reduces eye strain.
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post #651 of 662 Old 08-10-2019, 03:05 PM
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I've had numerous people ask if we could create an accurate 6500K bias light that also changed colors when that was desired. The answer is that we could (I'd never do it under the MediaLight brand, of course. That's purely D65). However, I'm not convinced that people would be willing to pay a premium for RGBW lights that could also be accurate bias lights.

I imagine that an RGBW solution would cost about $100-120 for something similar to our 4m Flex, which sells for $69. It has a very high CRI and super-tight color temp. I wouldn't include color temperature changing white, though, because the blackbody curve for 3000K is so different from the curve for 8,000 that meeting somewhere in the middle would not be accurate and would usually be on the magenta side of the blackbody curve, from my numerous (failed) tests.
Just as a data point, I've been looking for something that could do (close to) 6500k and also RGBW, when desired. I bought a well reviewed set of LED lights off Amazon, but the "white" is actually blue'ish green. I just purchased a Philips Hue light strip, so we'll see how that goes, but I'd happily pay MediaLight $120+ for accurate white with the ability to display other colors when wanted. I like setting the bias lighting to red when watching Stranger Things. Sue me .
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post #652 of 662 Old 08-10-2019, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by sd_smoker View Post
Just as a data point, I've been looking for something that could do (close to) 6500k and also RGBW, when desired. I bought a well reviewed set of LED lights off Amazon, but the "white" is actually blue'ish green. I just purchased a Philips Hue light strip, so we'll see how that goes, but I'd happily pay MediaLight $120+ for accurate white with the ability to display other colors when wanted. I like setting the bias lighting to red when watching Stranger Things. Sue me .
A simple solution would be to just install both an RGB strip and an accurate white strip. Once the white strip is matched in level to the display's peak white output for a dark room it can simply be switched on and off. When the viewer chooses to subjugate perceived color accuracy from the screen image for atmospheric variety, he can play with the colored lights.



Best regards and beautiful pictures,
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post #653 of 662 Old 08-10-2019, 03:59 PM
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The strip that I am testing right now alternates between RGB chips and Colorgrade D65 chips. It’s not going to match the Phillips hue because it does not have same primaries and the hue doesn’t have white. The primaries are the BT.2020 primaries.

I wanted to make a 5 V USB powered version, but the dimmer options are very limited. I think if I do this on a mass scale I will only do the 5 m 12 V version

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Just as a data point, I've been looking for something that could do (close to) 6500k and also RGBW, when desired. I bought a well reviewed set of LED lights off Amazon, but the "white" is actually blue'ish green. I just purchased a Philips Hue light strip, so we'll see how that goes, but I'd happily pay MediaLight $120+ for accurate white with the ability to display other colors when wanted. I like setting the bias lighting to red when watching Stranger Things. Sue me .
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post #654 of 662 Old 08-10-2019, 04:26 PM
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The strip that I am testing right now alternates between RGB chips and Colorgrade D65 chips. It’s not going to match the Phillips hue because it does not have same primaries and the hue doesn’t have white. The primaries are the BT.2020 primaries.

I wanted to make a 5 V USB powered version, but the dimmer options are very limited. I think if I do this on a mass scale I will only do the 5 m 12 V version
12v is fine with me. If this becomes publicly available, I'll be all over it!

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post #655 of 662 Old 09-02-2019, 01:46 PM
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why do some bias lighting solutions come with dimmers?...I thought the whole point was to hit 6500K color temp...isn't that just one color temp at the same brightness level?...why would I need to dim it to 20%, 40% etc?...do I need to constantly change the dimming percentage based on the brightness of the content I'm watching (HDR, SDR etc)...sounds like it would be annoying

I currently have a fixed 6500K bias light behind my OLED...I also like it because it doesn't require any adhesive strip to be stuck onto the back of the TV
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post #656 of 662 Old 09-02-2019, 02:04 PM
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Color temperature and brightness are different things. In most cases, even with HDR, the recommendations call for the lights to be between 10 to 15% of the maximum brightness (10-15% is what ISF recommends). Other specifications, such as those from SMPTE, are much dimmer. I keep mine at 10% of the maximum brightness of the display all the time.

That’s why MediaLight (which we make) is only available with a dimmer. I imagine that some lights don’t include a dimmer because it’s cheaper to not include one.

At full brightness, most LED strips are much brighter than reference levels (ours are much less efficient and less bright than low CRI chips, but still too bright without a dimmer) and you will lose the ability to see shadow detail.
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post #657 of 662 Old 09-02-2019, 02:46 PM
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Color temperature and brightness are different things. In most cases, even with HDR, the recommendations call for the lights to be between 10 to 15% of the maximum brightness (10-15% is what ISF recommends). Other specifications, such as those from SMPTE, are much dimmer. I keep mine at 10% of the maximum brightness of the display all the time.

That’s why MediaLight (which we make) is only available with a dimmer. I imagine that some lights don’t include a dimmer because it’s cheaper to not include one.

At full brightness, most LED strips are much brighter than reference levels (ours are much less efficient and less bright than low CRI chips, but still too bright without a dimmer) and you will lose the ability to see shadow detail.
so choosing 10% on the dimmer means it's 10% of the max brightness?...but how does it know the peak brightness of my TV?...all TV's don't have the same peak brightness (LCD vs OLED)...how would I be able to tell using my eyes the exact percentage?...(I hope what I'm saying makes sense)
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post #658 of 662 Old 09-02-2019, 02:57 PM
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10% brightness on the dimmer remote only gives you 10% of the maximum brightness of the bias lights.

This reference pattern is a 10% luminance pattern: https://www.biaslighting.com/pages/reference-pattern

Calibration discs like Spears & Munsil and R.Masciola include HDR maximum brightness patterns for 4.5/5 nits as specified by SMPTE, which I personally find too dim for viewing but reasonable for professional color grading applications. But SMPTE would not agree with me on this while ISF probably would.
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post #659 of 662 Old 09-03-2019, 01:54 PM
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why do some bias lighting solutions come with dimmers?...I thought the whole point was to hit 6500K color temp...isn't that just one color temp at the same brightness level?...why would I need to dim it to 20%, 40% etc?...do I need to constantly change the dimming percentage based on the brightness of the content I'm watching (HDR, SDR etc)...sounds like it would be annoying

I currently have a fixed 6500K bias light behind my OLED...I also like it because it doesn't require any adhesive strip to be stuck onto the back of the TV
Jason understands the principles pertaining to video viewing environments and the proper implementation of ambient back lighting (bias lighting) better than the vast majority of video professionals I have encountered in my 20+ years devoted to these issues. What I can add in response to your post relates to your final sentence. Bias lighting should be adjusted to correspond to the peak white output of the display after it is calibrated correctly according to standards for a dark room. Once that level is achieved, the bias light can simply be turned on and off, just as the display is turned on and off after calibration. The ambient light in a dark room should not fluctuate with scene changes in the program being watched on the display no more than you would change the calibration settings on the display while viewing programs.

I was the consultant used by both Spears & Munsil and Ryan Masciola for the development of their ambient light level adjustment test patterns. The S&M patterns are for 10% and 15% level targets. The Masciola program offers 5 nit, 10 nit, and 15 nit level targets. The formal standard for SMPTE compliance in reference mastering environments is 5 nits. Colorists view static images about half the time in post production mastering. Dark adaptation is therefore experienced for longer periods while viewing the display, allowing for more sensitive shadow detail recognition. Full dark adaptation in the human visual system for the darkest viewing conditions can take up to about half an hour!

The conditions for eye strain and viewing fatigue are most prominent not with static images but full motion program viewing. This is due to the "strobing effect" caused by erratic scene-to-scene brightness fluctuations throughout typical video programs. A good way to comprehend how this occurs is to turn your back to a TV in a dark room during a typical video program and note how much and how erratically the room is illuminated by the light coming from the display over time. Therefore, a 10% to 15% ambient light level adjustment target generally helps with eye strain/viewing fatigue issues better than 5 nits in the home.

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
G. Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
SMPTE, PVA, THX, ISF, Lion AV Consultants
www.cinemaquestinc.com


"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
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post #660 of 662 Old 09-04-2019, 07:57 AM
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Just to add that the new Spears & Munsil UHD HDR Benchmark includes the SMPTE recommended nit levels for HDR. The SDR disc (still on the market) includes the 10% reference for SDR.

Personally, I use 10% for TV viewing and 5 nit for color critical video editing on a monitor.

Complicating things a bit, if I’m really tired late at night and working on spreadsheets or scenarios where image quality is not even a factor, I will sometimes set my bias lights super bright — far above the reference levels. I find that it helps with dry eye and fatigue but you can’t see any shadow details.

When it comes to bias lights, “6500K” is thrown around so much that it’s at risk of becoming meaningless, like “true white” or “cool white.” Alan (GeorgeAB) and I both focus on chromaticity coordinates — not CCT (correlated color temperature). If the coordinates are correct, the CCT will be correct. If you focus on only CCT, the coordinates can be wildly off.

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Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post
Jason understands the principles pertaining to video viewing environments and the proper implementation of ambient back lighting (bias lighting) better than the vast majority of video professionals I have encountered in my 20+ years devoted to these issues. What I can add in response to your post relates to your final sentence. Bias lighting should be adjusted to correspond to the peak white output of the display after it is calibrated correctly according to standards for a dark room. Once that level is achieved, the bias light can simply be turned on and off, just as the display is turned on and off after calibration. The ambient light in a dark room should not fluctuate with scene changes in the program being watched on the display no more than you would change the calibration settings on the display while viewing programs.

I was the consultant used by both Spears & Munsil and Ryan Masciola for the development of their ambient light level adjustment test patterns. The S&M patterns are for 10% and 15% level targets. The Masciola program offers 5 nit, 10 nit, and 15 nit level targets. The formal standard for SMPTE compliance in reference mastering environments is 5 nits. Colorists view static images about half the time in post production mastering. Dark adaptation is therefore experienced for longer periods while viewing the display, allowing for more sensitive shadow detail recognition. Full dark adaptation in the human visual system for the darkest viewing conditions can take up to about half an hour!

The conditions for eye strain and viewing fatigue are most prominent not with static images but full motion program viewing. This is due to the "strobing effect" caused by erratic scene-to-scene brightness fluctuations throughout typical video programs. A good way to comprehend how this occurs is to turn your back to a TV in a dark room during a typical video program and note how much and how erratically the room is illuminated by the light coming from the display over time. Therefore, a 10% to 15% ambient light level adjustment target generally helps with eye strain/viewing fatigue issues better than 5 nits in the home.

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
G. Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
SMPTE, PVA, THX, ISF, Lion AV Consultants
www.cinemaquestinc.com


"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
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Jason Rosenfeld
Scenic Labs, LLC
Publisher of Spears & Munsil Benchmark UHD HDR Benchmark.
Maker of The ISF-certified MediaLight 6500K Bias Lighting System

Last edited by Scenic Labs; 09-04-2019 at 08:18 AM.
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