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post #31 of 66 Old 07-03-2018, 08:44 PM
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These will be spectacular as displays monitors for applications such as CAD.
If they make a 43" version. 65" is too big.
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post #32 of 66 Old 07-03-2018, 10:05 PM
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Not for me . The computer industry is now full of 4K, 5K, and even 8K monitors that are anywhere from 17" to 32" and then all most people do is run them scaled, because otherwise they can't even read the text on the screen. But resolution sells and since Apple started the resolution game with iPads, everyone followed suit. I think it's as gimmicky as these TV's.
100ppi looks super ugly though. In fact, I can't stand to use antialiasing at that resolution because it just makes a blurry mess. 200ppi is a huge improvement.
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post #33 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 06:06 AM
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post #34 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 06:36 AM
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Agreed. Rather have all the above before 8k but it looks like it's much cheaper to implement a higher resolution with the hdmi 2.1 chip than add 1000+ zones on a fald set. I guess that's why the Sony zd9 costs so much money.
LOL! The Sony Z9D has around 100 zones and is about 1500 - 2000 nits peak brightness, it's so expensive for a 2 year old TV because it's a Sony.

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post #35 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 06:38 AM
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For the people complaining about why not have higher zone count, more brightness ect. Have any of you stopped to realise this could be the Q9S model showed at CES with 4000 nits and 10-20 thousand mini LED zones?

The HDGuru website said this about these TV's.

"Samsung is preparing to deliver what is expected to be the first consumer-focused 8K Ultra HD display in the United States (and many other parts of the world) later this year. The display, which was shown at CES 2018 in January, uses densely packed full-array LEDs as backlight technology for high brightness and a wide dynamic range, enhanced by quantum dot (QLED) enhancement film to expand the color gamut and raise color volume."

Only one size was announced at CES and it was expected to be a very premium model. What if this is the Q9S but in a more acceptable price range.
Exactly, from everything we saw reported at CES 8K displays will be reserved for 85" and bigger TVs and they are putting their best tech in them. Lets wait to see what's officially announced before we start bashing it.
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post #36 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 06:42 AM
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My two cents... Further to completely agreeing with the folks who have already astutely pointed out the respective image sizes and viewing distances wherein 4K image resolution delineation becomes visible, let alone 8K, I think it's worth noting that according to both the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF) and THX, who drive industry standards and train professional video calibrators worldwide, resolution is not the most important factor influencing video performance and hence good picture quality.

In fact, image resolution is not even within the top three. According to ISF and THX, the fourth and least of the four key parameters is resolution; the single most apparent thing you see is dynamic range; contrast and black level are most important; and resolution is behind all of these as well as (all-importantly) colour saturation, depth, subsampling, and accuracy; and personally I'd also consider all of gamma performance, motion handling, off-axis performance, and uniformity to be of greater importance too.

So, I'm more interested in knowing with respect to these new Samsung 8K TVs what is the performance capability with respect to all these many other aspects of video performance which are significantly more important than image resolution.

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This thread seems to have a lot of negativity in it... Is this from people who are genuinely down on 8K in general or just mad because they have a 4K set and now 8K is being released?
I simply think that some folks (correctly) place the importance of image resolution way down the list of priorities; me included

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For me the most exciting thing about these upcoming Samsung TV's isn't the 8K resolution but the other aspects of it.

If this is the Q9S that was shown off at CES forget the 8K and look at the other benefits.

Firstly if its 8K and 120hz your going to get much more processing power than in the current TV's to be able to run that.

Secondly the Q9S model from CES not only had 4000 nits in brightness but also used a new type of local dimming. Micro dimming which has been reported to be between 10000-20000 zones.

This alone should give this set an outstanding picture and way ahead of any current LCD on the market and up there with OLED for black level response and much much better brightness.

The 8K is just the added bonus of being futureproof, especially if its going to have HDMI 2.1 or be upgradeable to 2.1.
I could not agree more and if these new Samsung TVs do indeed tout all of these amazing features then THAT is the main reason to be excited about them; wherein, as you say, the 8K resolution is a bonus and future-proofing.

I note that these 'next gen' TVs from Samsung reportedly will also deliver "full BT.2020 color range coverage" as well as "’Next Gen HDR’ (built around 4,000 nits of brightness); and 12-bit color depth support"; all of which will increase the video image quality substantially more than the 8K image resolution... and hopefully similarly supported will be color accuracy and CMS calibration capability; plus gamma, motion performance, and uniformity

But either way, with these 'next gen' TVs Samsung is clearly throwing down the gauntlet; which is always a good thing, especially given that the other manufacturers are inevitably similarly following suit with their own 'next gen' TV offerings... where for example we can soon expect to be seeing from LG larger OLED TVs sizes of 98" + (where LG recently invested billions into creating the respective manufacturing capability) and possibly / hopefully top emission OLED panels (finally); as well as SONY who demoed at the last CES their own 8K TV prototype, being 85" and sporting 10,000 nits peak luminance and SONY's new flagship 'next gen' X1 Ultimate video processing chipset.

The best thing about this kind of TV technology contest and competition between the respective manufacturers such as Samsung, Sony and LG etc. is that it drives the technology forwards and the prices downwards.

So the next 12 months should be seeing some very exciting advancements in consumer TVs, so I'm very much looking forward to personally eyeballing all of these at IFA, CEDIA and CES!

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post #37 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 06:47 AM
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LOL! The Sony Z9D has around 100 zones and is about 1500 - 2000 nits peak brightness, it's so expensive for a 2 year old TV because it's a Sony.
Actually the 100" SONY Z9D/ZD9 has over 1,000 dimming zones and over 2000 nits peak luminance.

Despite being a 2016 model TV it's still a phenomenal performing TV.

How much do you think that the the 98" Samsung 8K TV will cost?

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post #38 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 06:58 AM
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NEWS: Samung Coming Out With Two New Ranges of 8K TVs

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Originally Posted by ARROW-AV View Post
Actually the 100" SONY Z9D/ZD9 has over 1,000 dimming zones and over 2000 nits peak luminance.



Despite being a 2016 model TV it's still a phenomenal performing TV.



How much do you think that the the 98" Samsung 8K TV will cost?





Yes the 100” is totally different beast specs wise it also didn’t readily become available until almost 2017.

Although this thread is about Samsung the tea leaves are reporting there will be quite a few 8k sets soon from multiple manufacturers.

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post #39 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 08:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Friendlys View Post
Agreed. Rather have all the above before 8k but it looks like it's much cheaper to implement a higher resolution with the hdmi 2.1 chip than add 1000+ zones on a fald set. I guess that's why the Sony zd9 costs so much money.
LOL! The Sony Z9D has around 100 zones and is about 1500 - 2000 nits peak brightness, it's so expensive for a 2 year old TV because it's a Sony.

", we counted 36 vertical columns and 18 horizontal rows, giving a total of 648 dimming zones." This is from hdtvtest review of the 65 inch zd9. The 75 and 100 inch offer 100's more of course.
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post #40 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 08:18 AM
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", we counted 36 vertical columns and 18 horizontal rows, giving a total of 648 dimming zones." This is from hdtvtest review of the 65 inch zd9. The 75 and 100 inch offer 100's more of course.


The 100” is measured above 2600 nits
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post #41 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 08:44 AM
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Very interested in seeing how many zones we see in the new micro FALD architecture. The buzz is >10,000!
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post #42 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 09:23 AM
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The 100” is measured above 2600 nits
Not all units will necessarily do that much and that's also with everything jacked to the max and hence clipping etc. so that's not really 'useable' luminance; but it will certainly do over 2,000 nits peak luminance and that's both useable and post calibration

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", we counted 36 vertical columns and 18 horizontal rows, giving a total of 648 dimming zones." This is from hdtvtest review of the 65 inch zd9. The 75 and 100 inch offer 100's more of course.
The 75" has over 800 dimming zones and the 100" has over 1000.

As it happens I have previously had a conversation with Vincent Teoh of HDTVTest, whom I know well, regarding this very subject.

I don't think everyone realizes that this means that there is a significant increase in video performance with respect to the 75" model as compared with the 65" and the 100" as compared with the 75" further to simply the larger screen size. This also extends to aspects such as blooming, which the ZD9/Z9D has often been criticized regarding (especially as part of some of the TV shootout events); however, this is only really an issue with respect to the 65" sized Sony ZD9/Z9D; because, due to the greater number of dimming zones, the blooming is very significantly less with the 75" sized model TV, and pretty much nonexistent with the 100" model.

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Very interested in seeing how many zones we see in the new micro FALD architecture. The buzz is >10,000!
If that's true then that would be very nice indeed!

That said, I'm a bit of a 'Doubting Thomas' when it comes to this sort of thing... primarily because I've witnessed too many instances of prototypes that sport superior specs and tech as compared with what actually ends up being the launch product... but let's wait and see

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post #43 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 10:43 AM
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Actually the 100" SONY Z9D/ZD9 has over 1,000 dimming zones and over 2000 nits peak luminance.

Despite being a 2016 model TV it's still a phenomenal performing TV.

How much do you think that the the 98" Samsung 8K TV will cost?

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", we counted 36 vertical columns and 18 horizontal rows, giving a total of 648 dimming zones." This is from hdtvtest review of the 65 inch zd9. The 75 and 100 inch offer 100's more of course.
The 100" may be more than the standard 65" or 75", but it's also a $60,000 TV and well outside of the average consumer's price. The 65" and 75" was originally being reported over 600 zones, but later it was shown to be a very aggressive dimming algorithm and is actually in the 100 zones range, verified by the zone count in the actual service menus. Zone counts can fool the human eye, just look at early reviews of the 2018 Q8. People were counting over 200 zones when it first came out, now it's shown to be 40. And again, the Z9D was a way overpriced TV when it came out and still overpriced now; especially when you evaluate the rest of its performance, such as slow pixel response and horrible motion handling when compared with other high end Sony's.

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post #44 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 11:37 AM
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The 100" may be more than the standard 65" or 75", but it's also a $60,000 TV and well outside of the average consumer's price.
I agree. Which is why the more 100"+ sized TVs the better because the competition will indubitably drive prices downwards

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The 65" and 75" was originally being reported over 600 zones, but later it was shown to be a very aggressive dimming algorithm and is actually in the 100 zones range, verified by the zone count in the actual service menus. Zone counts can fool the human eye, just look at early reviews of the 2018 Q8. People were counting over 200 zones when it first came out, now it's shown to be 40. And again, the Z9D was a way overpriced TV when it came out and still overpriced now; especially when you evaluate the rest of its performance, such as slow pixel response and horrible motion handling when compared with other high end Sony's.
It sounds like you are not a fan of the Sony ZD9/Z9D

But with respect, what you say here is quite simply not true.

Firstly, the 65" ZD9/Z9D in fact originally (as in with respect to the prototype) reported 4,000 nits peak luminance and over 1,000 dimming zones; however, SONY subsequently downscaled that due to economic viability. So that's not factually correct what you are saying there.

Also, despite common misconcepton, the SONY ZD9/Z9D is not FALD. It's a new technology developed by SONY, named Backlight Master Drive, wherein the 'dimming zones' are in fact individual / whole LEDs; so it's impossible for the number of dimming zones to 'reduce' both in the manner you describe and with respect to FALD TVs like the Samsung Q8 to which you refer.

Have you personally analyzed and evaluated multiple units of both the 75" and 100" ZD9/Z9D? Because I have... and the dimming zones are over 800 for the 75" and over 1,000 for the 100"; and for what it's worth Vincent Teoh of HDTVTest concurs.

The dimming functionality and/or potency is adjustable as well.

So to say "it was shown to be a very aggressive dimming algorithm" is a factually inaccurate overgeneralization.

Some of the bundled menu 'performance features' that can be toggled on/off induce black crush by the way, which is why I always turn such offenders off and recommend others do so as well, so it's possible these were active whenever whoever decided "it was shown to be a very aggressive dimming algorithm"; but this is by no means the case when correctly setup and calibrated properly and/or optimally. Those are the functioning dimming zone numbers and when setup and calibrated properly there's absolutely zero black crush. So no, the dimming isn't very (as in overly) aggressive, unless you unnecessarily setup the TV to be that way.

That said, there's no question that the SONY ZD9/Z9D TVs are expensive, which is why the more 100"+ sized TVs the better, because like I have said, the competition will indubitably drive prices downwards. Regarding which, I can't wait to see the full extent of what 'next gen' TVs will be offered by all the manufacturers alike, and that's not only with respect to the likes of Samsung, Sony, LG, and Panasonic; but everyone else too


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post #45 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 12:24 PM
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I agree. Which is why the more 100"+ sized TVs the better because the competition will indubitably drive prices downwards


It sounds like you are not a fan of the Sony ZD9/Z9D

But with respect, what you say here is quite simply not true.

Firstly, the 65" ZD9/Z9D in fact originally (as in with respect to the prototype) reported 4,000 nits peak and over 1,000 dimming zones... the problem is that SONY downscaled that due to economic viability. So that's not factually correct what you are saying there.

Also, despite common misconcepton, the SONY ZD9/Z9D is not FALD. It's a new technology developed by SONY, named Backlight Master Drive, wherein the 'dimming zones' are in fact whole LEDs, so it's impossible for the number of dimming zones to 'reduce' both in the manner you describe and with respect to FALD TVs like the Samsung Q8 to which you refer.

Have you personally analyzed and evaluated multiple units of both the 75" and 100" ZD9/Z9D? Because I have... and the dimming zones are over 800 for the 75" and over 1,000 for the 100"; and for what it's worth Vincent Teoh of HDTVTest concurs.

The dimming functionality and/or potency is adjustable as well.

So to say "it was shown to be a very aggressive dimming algorithm" is a factually inaccurate overgeneralization.

Some of the bundled menu 'performance features' that can be toggled on/off induce black crush by the way, which is why I always turn such offenders off and recommend others do so as well, so it's possible these were active whenever whoever decided "it was shown to be a very aggressive dimming algorithm"; but this is by no means the case when correctly setup and calibrated properly and/or optimally. Those are the functioning dimming zone numbers and when setup and calibrated properly there's absolutely zero black crush. So no, the dimming isn't very (as in overly) aggressive, unless you unnecessarily setup the TV to be that way.

That said, there's no question that the SONY ZD9/Z9D TVs are expensive, which is why the more 100"+ sized TVs the better, because like I have said, the competition will indubitably drive prices downwards. Regarding which, I can't wait to see the full extent of what 'next gen' TVs will be offered by all the manufacturers alike, and that's not only with respect to the likes of Samsung, Sony, LG, and Panasonic; but everyone else too

Maybe I'm wrong, apologies if I am, but I remember seeing screen shots of the Z9D's service menu saying something like "[zone 16x8]". I didn't intend to get into a Z9d debate, I was only responding to someone else claiming the Z9d was super expensive because of it's outlandish and overblown stats, and it seemed to me like he was comparing it to the price of these new TVs being announced.
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post #46 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 12:31 PM
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If the upcoming 8K TV's are the Q9S model with the same or similar specs to the one shown at CES this year I know what tv ill be getting. I currently own the 75 inch Q9FN and its one of the best LCD TV's iv owned The specs on the Q9S could be a whole generational leap if true. Luckily I bought my Q9FN on the 100 day trial from Samsung direct so have up till the 18th of August to return it which ill most likely do and wait for IFA to see whats revealed.

The only downside on the Q9FN for me is the blooming on HDR content. While its not there 90% of the time you still notice it on scenes with a small bright object on a black background. Having 10000-20000 micro dimming zones should sort that.
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post #47 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 12:42 PM
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Maybe I'm wrong, apologies if I am, but I remember seeing screen shots of the Z9D's service menu saying something like "[zone 16x8]". I didn't intend to get into a Z9d debate, I was only responding to someone else claiming the Z9d was super expensive because of it's outlandish and overblown stats, and it seemed to me like he was comparing it to the price of these new TVs being announced.
You are absolutely right that the SONY ZD9/Z9D is expensive. But the other guy was/is also correct too in saying that this was/is somewhat due to the cost of its high performing aspects such as the novel Backlight MasterDrive technology and the at-the-time comparatively very high nits peak luminance etc.

That said, the SONY ZD9/Z9D is by no means perfect, wherein most of us know its list of criticisms; however, the dimming zones and peak luminance are not 'overblown', they are real. The problem is that it is only the 100" model wherein the blooming issue is essentially a non-issue, but like you astutely point out it costs 60,000 bucks!

I think we can all agree that OLED isn't perfect either. Which is why I personally consider MicroLED, as per Samsung's The Wall and Sony's Crystal LED (a.k.a. CLEDIS) to be so exciting, because it essentially offers the best of OLED and LED/LCD without any of their associated various flaws and/or negative aspects. However, MicroLED is currently not just very expensive, but very very expensive. For example, a 4K display of Sony's Crystal LED MicroLED costs $2.5 million and Samsung's The Wall is $350,000.

That's why new 'next gen' TV offerings from the likes of Samsung, Sony, and LG within the next upcoming months is most welcomed; because hopefully with multiple manufacturers all competing and slugging it out with eachother in this regard we can see the technology evolving forwards with prices starting expensive but being driven downwards via competition.

Wherein, I think the imminent manifestation of 98"+ sized OLED TVs in particular is going to make things 'interesting' in this regard; especially when the technology, and hence the possibility, also exists with respect to making these 'rollable' (as per demoed by LG at CES 2018) such that they roll into/out of a compact sized box, similar to rollable projection screens

So hopefully we can see some of this new 'next gen' technology featuring within TVs and video displays that are actually affordable by more than the super-rich who account for less than 0.1% of the general population!

Personally, I think the next 12 months as far as consumer TVs and video displays should be very exciting indeed in this regard

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post #48 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 12:59 PM
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If the upcoming 8K TV's are the Q9S model with the same or similar specs to the one shown at CES this year I know what tv ill be getting. I currently own the 75 inch Q9FN and its one of the best LCD TV's iv owned The specs on the Q9S could be a whole generational leap if true. Luckily I bought my Q9FN on the 100 day trial from Samsung direct so have up till the 18th of August to return it which ill most likely do and wait for IFA to see whats revealed.

The only downside on the Q9FN for me is the blooming on HDR content. While its not there 90% of the time you still notice it on scenes with a small bright object on a black background. Having 10000-20000 micro dimming zones should sort that.
I could be wrong, but I have a feeling that only a flagship model would incorporate all of the reported 'next gen' features; and perhaps even the first generation new flagship won't even do so... Wherein if it does it probably won't be cheap... Let's see

Also, the competition are by no means going to be sitting on their hands, so it might be worth seeing what everyone else showcases at IFA (and CEDIA).

But yes indeed 10000-20000 dimming zones should certainly help to eliminate blooming that's for sure!

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post #49 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 02:32 PM
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Leave it to Samsung!

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Chill guys. Until the 1080p/4k HDR issues are worked out with HDMI 2.0b, 8k is nothing more than a "we can do this". HDMI 2.1, as i have stated, is going to be a nightmare, much like HDMI 2.0b and 4k HDR.
IMO Samsung is putting the carriage before the horse. Go figure! Being a ks8000 owner I will never buy another Samsung television. Let's get 4k perfected before moving on to 8k. That's just me though.....
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post #50 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 03:03 PM
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IMO Samsung is putting the carriage before the horse. Go figure! Being a ks8000 owner I will never buy another Samsung television. Let's get 4k perfected before moving on to 8k. That's just me though.....
I agree about getting 4k HDR worked out first. Cable length second, and then worry about 8k later on (way later on). It's all marketing and proof of concept anyway.
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post #51 of 66 Old 07-04-2018, 05:47 PM
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What needs to be worked out with 4k? Use proper hardware, pop in a disc, watch your movie. Heck, folks are enjoying UHD from their computers using proper software. This has been ongoing for years. Bring on 8k. Most of us won't complain about it.
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post #52 of 66 Old 07-05-2018, 12:07 AM
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I enjoy seeing new resolution TV releases, it's great to see what new tech is coming and what will filter down into affordable models.


All new releases have their tech issues, it goes for all products that are built these days, frustrating, it is how it is.

Some good stuff has been brought up about the 8K requiring better processors, real 12 bit, better colour spec, eta.

It's good to see them pushing the boundaries, i'm also excited to see what CES is going to bring.

I'm fond of large screens, if they can get more 88 inch's out there, the prices will drop after a few years, 8K will just be a bonus

Hopefully by mid 2020 we will be kicking along with a 88 inch 8K screen playing 4k content on a PS5

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post #53 of 66 Old 07-05-2018, 12:51 AM
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Exactly! Embrace new technology. It doesn't take away the 4K TV's and doesn't hurt the TV's you currently own. Its new tech and new tech is always good to see. I'm excited to see the specs.
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post #54 of 66 Old 07-05-2018, 05:31 AM
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I have nothing against 8K per se, but consider this. A person with 20/20 vision has to sit 5.5' from an 84" screen to fully resolve 4k. So my take is 8K is a waste, at normal viewing distances, until you go to 100"+ screen sizes. In addition, I don't care how good the processor may be, native 4K will trump 4K upscaled to 8K. I can only imagine what 720p/1080i would like upscaled to 8k.


Uncompressed, true 4K, not upscaled 2K, is already near the line of what our eyes can resolve in the vast majority of home use. I prefer they put their R&D in perfecting that.
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post #55 of 66 Old 07-05-2018, 07:59 AM
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I don't find myself having to pixel peep in order to resolve higher resolution? 2160p @ 12' viewing a 65" screen vs the same with 1080p is a big difference. I placed my 2160p Samsung next to my 1080p Samsung for comparison before swapping using the same titles and same HTPC to compare. We laughed realizing the comparison test was a waste of time. It was that prominent. I think all these scientific formulas regarding distance, human eye capability, and resolution don't hold water in the real world or my results would have been proven different.


To say native 4k trumps 4k upscaled to 8k is yet to be seen. I remember naysayers claiming native 1080p would never look better upscaled to 2160p before I had any 2160p titles. This is why I did my SBS test, to test my existing 1080p collection. All I can say from experience is the naysayers were wrong. Very wrong. I assume the same will happen when I SBS test my 8k display with 4k titles when the time comes.


I think many people are deriving their conclusions using junk sources. Since TV broadcast and streaming services are the majority of users intake and they don't see any improvement, they assume their new 4k TV isn't all that or that they must sit closer to get anything out of it. They go as far as getting OLED TV's, which thrive in junk source environments, to process the junk into something watchable at the expense of detail loss. Then draw their conclusions... often praising the TV overlooking what they are feeding it.


Imo, improvements will always be made at the display level but displays are not THE problem. Resolution increases are welcomed. What you do with them is a different story. In my country, 1080i broadcast and compressed 4k streaming is as good as it gets. It does not compare to uncompressed lossless original sources and most don't care. They are what they eat and blame their equipment and technology in general while waving scientific papers about seating distances angry when others claim different experiences using different ingredients.


If anything needs to be improved before moving on, it's public education through forums such as this. Most folks don't know which ports to plug HDMI cables in much less which type of cables to use. Gone are the days all one did was plug the set into the wall, attach two leads from the rabbit ears and start wiggling the antenna around until you got a picture. Todays tech offers so many choices, enhancements and adjustments, one needs a degree in computer science just to understand the terminology. Its no wonder most throw their arms in the air and ask which TV and which streaming service their coworker or neighbor is using relying on testimonials of sheeple based on marketing popularity rather than informed decisions. I'm already hearing 8k will be a waste of money just as I did about 4k.

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post #56 of 66 Old 07-05-2018, 08:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brazen1 View Post
I don't find myself having to pixel peep in order to resolve higher resolution? 2160p @ 12' viewing a 65" screen vs the same with 1080p is a big difference. I placed my 2160p Samsung next to my 1080p Samsung for comparison before swapping using the same titles and same HTPC to compare. We laughed realizing the comparison test was a waste of time. It was that prominent. I think all these scientific formulas regarding distance, human eye capability, and resolution don't hold water in the real world or my results would have been proven different.


To say native 4k trumps 4k upscaled to 8k is yet to be seen. I remember naysayers claiming native 1080p would never look better upscaled to 2160p before I had any 2160p titles. This is why I did my SBS test, to test my existing 1080p collection. All I can say from experience is the naysayers were wrong. Very wrong. I assume the same will happen when I SBS test my 8k display with 4k titles when the time comes.

Then you have 20/10 vision, I wish I did. Also, my earlier post clearly stated "fully" resolve a 4k image. Improvement, 2K v 4K, can begin to be noticed at longer distances.


It doesn't remain to be seen that native 4K can't look better than what it is in its native form. You can't increase resolution with processing/upscaling, but you can introduce artifacts. AVS forum is full of complaints about the way cable/sat looks when upscaled to 4k.
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post #57 of 66 Old 07-05-2018, 08:23 AM - Thread Starter
 
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It would be far more useful, if the 8K was a flexible display with automatic rollup on power off. Set it up like a projector screen in the middle of a room. It would be 4-5 feet away from the couch. Even better, if it unrolls in front of the windows and blocks the light.

It looks like that kind of tech will only be available on LG and their panel buyers like Sony and Panasonic.
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post #58 of 66 Old 07-05-2018, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by egrady View Post
I have nothing against 8K per se, but consider this. A person with 20/20 vision has to sit 5.5' from an 84" screen to fully resolve 4k. So my take is 8K is a waste, at normal viewing distances, until you go to 100"+ screen sizes.
Except that what is a normal distance depends on screen size. So larger screens don't necessarily make 8K more useful.

What would make 8K potentially useful is "panoramic" content, such as a football game that shows the entire field without camera movement.
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post #59 of 66 Old 07-06-2018, 09:21 AM
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Im just thinking out loud,

If Samsung are releasing these new 8K supports late this year, you would have to assume that they have got HDMI 2.1, as its pointless if it doesn't, but then this would be one of the first TV's released with it.

So i'm thinking, it'll be released with an upgradable one connect box that is possibly upgradable via firmware, or optional 2.1 HDMI evolution connect box.

It's the only thing that makes sense to me at this point in time.

Still this is just a guess until its officially announced

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post #60 of 66 Old 07-06-2018, 11:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Bryn23 View Post
Im just thinking out loud,

If Samsung are releasing these new 8K supports late this year, you would have to assume that they have got HDMI 2.1, as its pointless if it doesn't, but then this would be one of the first TV's released with it.

So i'm thinking, it'll be released with an upgradable one connect box that is possibly upgradable via firmware, or optional 2.1 HDMI evolution connect box.

It's the only thing that makes sense to me at this point in time.

Still this is just a guess until its officially announced

Sharp released their Aquos 8K TV in April without HDMI 2.1 I wouldn't be surprised if Samsung leaves it out also. The receiver chipsets came out this year. If they were working with the HDMI chipset makers and HDMI organization for certification, it would be amazing to have it in September.
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