Is Dolby Vision a "Must Have Feature" for Your Next TV? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
View Poll Results: Is Dolby Vision a "Must Have Feature" for Your Next TV
Yes 295 71.43%
No 118 28.57%
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post #1 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 11:05 AM - Thread Starter
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Is Dolby Vision a "Must Have Feature" for Your Next TV?

Today’s 4K and 8K TVs offer exceptional picture quality thanks to the combination of high-resolution and HDR with wide color gamut. Today, there are four HDR formats found on consumer TVs: HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision and HLG. However, not all TVs support all four formats.

Arguably, the quality that is available to consumers at home has superseded that of commercial movie theaters, thanks to the capabilities of modern flat-panel displays. For example, HDR content for home viewing is typically mastered to either 1000 nits or 4000 nits peak luminance (typically 4000 nits) giving it a lifelike appearance when shown on a compatible display.

The most common flavor of HDR is HDR10. This format is used by streaming services, video games, as well as Ultra HD Blu-ray. HDR10 provides 10-bit color for smooth gradation, but it relies on static metadata. That means if a TV cannot match the monitor upon which the content was mastered, some sort of compensation is required. With static metadata, TVs take a one-size-fits-all approach to filling in performance gaps.

Dolby Vision has emerged as the most popular alternative to HDR10. This format is capable of handling 12-bit color, for ultra-smooth gradation. Moreover, it employs dynamic metadata that helps the TV optimize content based on its capabilities, scene by scene. So, if the TV is not able to match a mastering monitor, it will still make the most of the content that it’s fed. Dolby Vision is available on a wide variety of televisions, including those sold by LG, Sony, TCL, Hisense and Vizio… but not Samsung (which relies on HDR10+, a format that also includes dynamic metadata).

Ever since it was released, I have seen enthusiasm for Dolby Vision grow. Its adoption by major streaming services including Netflix, Amazon and Vudu increases its appeal. This is particularly so for the streaming original shows such as those offered by Netflix and Amazon in UHD. The fidelity of that material is movie quality.

Arguably, if the TV is good enough, the advantage of dynamic metadata “melts away.” However there is no consumer retail television that is able to output 4000 nits peak luminance while in a calibrated “Movie Mode.” So, currently, all TVs need some sort of help to determine how to tonemap the material. With regular HDR10, this is accomplished with an algorithm that takes its best guess at how to handle discrepancy. With dynamic metadata, whether it's Dolby Vision or HDR10+, there is no guesswork involved on behalf of the TV. Having said all that, the algorithms that do the translation of vanilla HDR10 have gotten quite good. Consequently, the days of HDR10 content looking too dark are largely behind us.

So, having said that, here is my simple yes/no question: Is Dolby Vision a "Must Have Feature" for your next TV?

Mark Henninger
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Last edited by imagic; 03-13-2019 at 02:51 PM.
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post #2 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 11:10 AM
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Haha Mark, when I saw it was you asking the question, I figured you were going to tell us the answer 😀

For me, DV would be nice to have...
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post #3 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 11:17 AM
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I'm going to vote no. But only because I have 3 TV's that have it. However, yes, is the answer to having to have Dolby Vision. However, marginal the difference is, it's still nice to have.

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post #4 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 11:21 AM
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Voted no. Definitely a nice to have, and I enjoy it on my OLED, but don't think it's essential as more displays cross the 2000 nits mark, with some even approaching 4000 nits.

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post #5 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 11:45 AM
 
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Dolby Vision is encoded at 12 bit, this is one part that people leave out. It's not just about nits.

1. I find that dolby vision is able to provide a little better color saturation level compared to hdr10, if i force the hdr10 base layer from 4k dolby vision blu rays and compare it to the dolby vision version on my oled tv, i generally find the colors to look deeper on dolby vision, I'm not talking only about specular highlights. For example the green grass in scenes would have better saturation with dolby vision. I have seen Dolby Vision on a friend's sony z9d lcd too, the better saturation advantage is also present on that tv.

2. Vincent Teoh , last year in a youtube video, demonstrated by using the 4k blu ray of Despicable Me 3 that the 12 bit dolby vision compared to 10 bit hdr10 is also able to deal better with posterization artifacts (color banding). He ran some comparison slides of despicable me 3 in dolby vision and hdr10 and the dolby vision version looked cleaner with regards to any color banding.
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post #6 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 11:52 AM
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Definitely not a must but not bad if you can get it on a tv for a good price. The other thing to consider is the licensing aspect of the industry. Dolby charges a higher fee to license their Dolby vision as opposed to HDR so this may be one of those situations like Blu-Ray vs HD in that the industry will deem who comes out on top.


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post #7 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 12:09 PM
 
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Is there any major manufacturer other than samsung who doesn't support Dolby Vision as of 2019? Panasonic and philips both this year announced having dolby vision support in their 2019 models , while still retaining hdr10+.

Samsung seems the lone odd one out. And after their exit from the blu ray market, the chances of their co-developed HDR10+ format gaining any steam has gone down considerably.

To answer the OP question, yes Dolby vision matters to me, i paid higher for my AVR model to have the one that supported dolby vision passthrough. The tv I consider is also with dolby vision support. This year, my main reason for avoiding panasonic oleds upto now (for not supporting dolby vision) has been addressed, and they are on my consideration list.

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post #8 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 12:15 PM
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I answered no.

While I think it would be great to have, it’s not a deal breaker for me. I bought a 2019 Samsung model without it. I’m looking at TVs as a whole (price, features, size, PQ, design, etc.). While Dolby Vision is something I would consider paying a little more for, I wouldn’t exclude a set that checked all the other boxes for the right price.
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post #9 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 12:32 PM
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If implemented correctly meaning both the source material and the TVs capabilities are up for it than yes, I see a telltale difference and it’s more than a nice to have.
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post #10 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 12:42 PM
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I voted no.

I'm not really convinced it makes a huge day and night difference. Not on my currents sets anyway (Z9D).

And while they do support it, my AVRs don't so I watch everything in "good ol HDR10".
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post #11 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 12:51 PM
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I voted NO. I don't anticipate buying another television in the near future (I have three now). Which means for the time being I'll be making do with HDR10.

If and when I do buy another television, it will be Sony or Panasonic. I'm confident they'll have what I need. It's not a big deal for me.

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post #12 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 01:09 PM
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I voted "No", even though every piece of AV equipment in my living room, bedroom, and office just happens to support it. I don't think it's anything special, and I don't understand why people get so worked up about it. But that's just me...I'm only here for the high dynamic range eye candy, and I don't really care who brings it.
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post #13 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 01:12 PM
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It must be, because I already have it on my LG Oled. I wish my UHD projector could understand it, but I know it never will....
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post #14 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 01:21 PM
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Must have? No

It would definitely push me towards a TV over a non-DV TV though.
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post #15 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 01:51 PM
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I can definitely see the difference on my E6 OLED. IMO, it makes a big difference on OLED tv's. Can't speak for LCD, since I don't own one.

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post #16 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 02:23 PM
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So here we go down the Dolby Vision rabit hole.

Is Dolby Vision a "Must Have Feature" for your next TV?

No...IS it nice to have it included? yes

right now there are no tv's with a 12bit color panel, there is only a small image difference between HDR10 and Dolby Vision, not to metion the different DV profiles that A/V manufactures must account for just so you can see it.

I'm looking at the Panasonic UB820 to replace my X800 just for the “HDR Optimizer.” it really makes HDR10 content look every bit as good as Dolby Vision without having to have a DV ready TV.
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post #17 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 02:25 PM
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I thought I read that the whole "adopts and optimizes on your TV" is misleading and not true.

Dynamic metadata means the author can change the maximum and minimum luminance of a scene (or frame) on the fly. There's no intelligence to it to what TV you have.

The TV receives a signal and the TV optimization is happenstance.

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post #18 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Menarini View Post
Dolby Vision is encoded at 12 bit, this is one part that people leave out. It's not just about nits.

1. I find that dolby vision is able to provide a little better color saturation level compared to hdr10, if i force the hdr10 base layer from 4k dolby vision blu rays and compare it to the dolby vision version on my oled tv, i generally find the colors to look deeper on dolby vision, I'm not talking only about specular highlights. For example the green grass in scenes would have better saturation with dolby vision. I have seen Dolby Vision on a friend's sony z9d lcd too, the better saturation advantage is also present on that tv.

2. Vincent Teoh , last year in a youtube video, demonstrated by using the 4k blu ray of Despicable Me 3 that the 12 bit dolby vision compared to 10 bit hdr10 is also able to deal better with posterization artifacts (color banding). He ran some comparison slides of despicable me 3 in dolby vision and hdr10 and the dolby vision version looked cleaner with regards to any color banding.
but what good is that at the moment when no TV available for consumer purchase at the moment can do anything of value with that 12 bit information.
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post #19 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptinCrunch View Post
So here we go down the Dolby Vision rabit hole.

Is Dolby Vision a "Must Have Feature" for your next TV?

No...IS it nice to have it included? yes

right now there are no tv's with a 12bit color panel, there is only a small image difference between HDR10 and Dolby Vision, not to metion the different DV profiles that A/V manufactures must account for just so you can see it.

I'm looking at the Panasonic UB820 to replace my X800 just for the “HDR Optimizer.” it really makes HDR10 content look every bit as good as Dolby Vision without having to have a DV ready TV.
I know too bad it's still a bit pricey although I see that Bestbuy knocked off $50 of the MSRP
I'm waiting until it gets to the price I'm willing to purchase it at
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post #20 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 03:12 PM
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I voted yes. I prefer Dolby Vision and have 2 TV's that will display it. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so it's definitely a personal preference, I won't buy anymore TV's without it.
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post #21 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 03:14 PM
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I must have really wanted it because I sold my 1.5 year old Samsung and got a Sony Z9D to get it.
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post #22 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
Today’s 4K and 8K TVs offer exceptional picture quality thanks to the combination of high-resolution and HDR with wide color gamut. Today, there are four HDR formats found on consumer TVs: HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision and HLG. However, not all TVs support all four formats.

Arguably, the quality that is available to consumers at home has superseded that of commercial movie theaters, thanks to the capabilities of modern flat-panel displays. For example, HDR content for home viewing is typically mastered to either 1000 nits or 4000 nits peak luminance (typically 4000 nits) giving it a lifelike appearance when shown on a compatible display.

The most common flavor of HDR is HDR10. This format is used by streaming services, video games, as well as Ultra HD Blu-ray. HDR10 provides 10-bit color for smooth gradation, but it relies on static metadata. That means if a TV cannot match the monitor upon which the content was mastered, some sort of compensation is required. With static metadata, TVs take a one-size-fits-all approach to filling in performance gaps.

Dolby Vision has emerged as the most popular alternative to HDR10. This format is capable of handling 12-bit color, for ultra-smooth gradation. Moreover, it employs dynamic metadata that helps the TV optimize content based on its capabilities, scene by scene. So, if the TV is not able to match a mastering monitor, it will still make the most of the content that it’s fed. Dolby Vision is available on a wide variety of televisions, including those sold by LG, Sony, TCL, Hisense and Vizio… but not Samsung (which relies on HDR10+, a format that also includes dynamic metadata).

Ever since it was released, I have seen enthusiasm for Dolby Vision grow. Its adoption by major streaming services including Netflix, Amazon and Vudu increases its appeal. This is particularly so for the streaming original shows such as those offered by Netflix and Amazon in UHD. The fidelity of that material is movie quality.

Arguably, if the TV is good enough, the advantage of dynamic metadata “melts away.” However there is no consumer retail television that is able to output 4000 nits peak luminance while in a calibrated “Movie Mode.” So, currently, all TVs need some sort of help to determine how to tonemap the material. With regular HDR10, this is accomplished with an algorithm that takes its best guess at how to handle discrepancy. With dynamic metadata, whether it's Dolby Vision or HDR10+, there is no guesswork involved on behalf of the TV. Having said all that, the algorithms that do the translation of vanilla HDR10 have gotten quite good. Consequently, the days of HDR10 content looking too dark are largely behind us.

So, having said that, here is my simple yes/no question: Is Dolby Vision a "Must Have Feature" for your next TV?
it's a must have for me in my next tv purchase.

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post #23 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 04:28 PM
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Yes. Definitely yes. Frustrating that Samsung is the only mfg that doesn’t support DV, which means my options are severely restricted. Regardless, DV is must because of both our physical and streaming library.
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post #24 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 04:45 PM
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Yes , TVs should support all HDR fomats. Just like AV recievers should support all sound formats.

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/465-h...-displays.html
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post #25 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 05:02 PM
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No. Not a must have. I've had the luxury of comparing DV vs HDR10. Some films DV is clearly superior while others I didn't even notice the difference. Most people aren't doing A/B tests like that though. They just watch the movie. You can't miss what you don't know about.
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post #26 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 05:59 PM
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If the TV handled DV very well, then yes. I read an awful lot about TV's (even expensive TV's) screwing up DV or displaying it "very dark". A lot of upset Netflix viewers out there, if you go by the forums here.
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post #27 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 06:13 PM
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I also voted no. DV was a bullet point on my list of pros and cons when weighing which TV to buy, but not having it was not a disqualifying factor. The lack of DV was not enough to prevent me from ordering a Q900 based on the other benefits, as I saw them, to that set.

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post #28 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 06:17 PM
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It completely depends on the TV. Low end or low-ish brightness , Dolby Vision all the way. Otherwise, take the TV that has the best specs. A high end hdr10 TV is much better than a low end TV with Dolby Vision. Anyone out there actually think a $600 tv with Dolby Vision would be better than say a Z9D playing hdr10?

Another example, David Katzmaier of Cnet reviewed the 2018 Samsung Q9FN in December and he compared Hdr10 on the Q9FN against Dolby Vision on the Vizio PQ, Z9F, etc, and he still preferred the Q9FN over the other lcd tvs (but still preffered the oled B8 out of them all).


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post #29 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 06:22 PM
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Thanks for this thread - I am torn between the Q80R and Sony X950G. If only Samsung would adopt DV, I would think about this less.

Most of the content I'll watch is Apple 4K TV DV movies, so I think it may be a must for me.
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post #30 of 134 Old 03-13-2019, 06:27 PM
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I had done a fair amount of reading and decided Dolby Vision was a must for my new 4K TV system.
Of course that eliminated all Samsung equipment.
I am now enjoying my Vizio PQ65, fed by my LG UBK90 thru my Onkyo TX-RZ810 - and am very pleased with the results of my decisions!

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