Are all 18gbps High performance HDMI cables the same? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 23 Old 07-26-2018, 06:21 AM - Thread Starter
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Are all 18gbps High performance HDMI cables the same?

So I have two of these (Monoprice 15ft 18Gbps Ultra Slim Series High Performance HDMI® Cable w/ RedMere® Technology) in my wall now and am upgrading to a Sony 85x900F panel in the near future. Not sure if I need to replace them with something like these (Monoprice DynamicView Active High Speed HDMI Cable - 4K @ 60Hz, HDR, 18Gbps, 34AWG, YUV 4:4:4, CL2, 15ft) just to make sure.


Both are 18Gbps, but will both do the same job, i.e. [email protected], HDR, YUV 4:4:4? Everything in my signature below will remain the same with the exception of the panel.


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post #2 of 23 Old 07-26-2018, 06:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiptouz View Post
So I have two of these (Monoprice 15ft 18Gbps Ultra Slim Series High Performance HDMI Cable w/ RedMere Technology) in my wall now and am upgrading to a Sony 85x900F panel in the near future. Not sure if I need to replace them with something like these (Monoprice DynamicView Active High Speed HDMI Cable - 4K @ 60Hz, HDR, 18Gbps, 34AWG, YUV 4:4:4, CL2, 15ft) just to make sure.


Both are 18Gbps, but will both do the same job, i.e. [email protected], HDR, YUV 4:4:4? Everything in my signature below will remain the same with the exception of the panel.
Technically, at 15’ you don’t need an active cable and a high quality non-active cable should suffice to handle the available formats for the next year or so. That being said, new “redmere” chipsets came out March 2018 and may be required to transmit all current formats. So even though your cable length should be fine, if you’re using older “active” tech, you may be limited by that tech (which you may not have needed in the first place)

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post #3 of 23 Old 07-26-2018, 09:01 AM
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I agree with the above with an exception. At 15', you shouldn't have any issues when using a Premium Certified High Speed HDMI cable. Active termination (Redmere) is really not necessary in your case (even if you can find a cable that has the current chipsets) because the idea of an active cable is to maintain signal integrity over longer lengths (25'+). However, for an in-wall installation I'd install a conduit, with a pull string, and seriously consider using a hybrid fiber cable. The use of a conduit is the ONLY way to future proof your cabling and a hybrid fiber cable will probably work just fine, at 15', for HDMI 2.1 if that is a consideration. The downside of using an active cable is, like any other electronic device, the chipsets in the source end can fail overtime and if that happens, you have no choice but to replace the cable. With a conduit installed, that's relatively easy. Also, a conduit make it easy to control the bend radius, which can affect signal propagation if it is too drastic.

Keep in mind that there are no 100% guarantees that a cable will work with any give setup, regardless of the cable mfrs' claim.
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post #4 of 23 Old 08-02-2018, 01:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
I agree with the above with an exception. At 15', you shouldn't have any issues when using a Premium Certified High Speed HDMI cable. Active termination (Redmere) is really not necessary in your case (even if you can find a cable that has the current chipsets) because the idea of an active cable is to maintain signal integrity over longer lengths (25'+). However, for an in-wall installation I'd install a conduit, with a pull string, and seriously consider using a hybrid fiber cable. The use of a conduit is the ONLY way to future proof your cabling and a hybrid fiber cable will probably work just fine, at 15', for HDMI 2.1 if that is a consideration. The downside of using an active cable is, like any other electronic device, the chipsets in the source end can fail overtime and if that happens, you have no choice but to replace the cable. With a conduit installed, that's relatively easy. Also, a conduit make it easy to control the bend radius, which can affect signal propagation if it is too drastic.

Keep in mind that there are no 100% guarantees that a cable will work with any give setup, regardless of the cable mfrs' claim.
I have some 2013 Monoprice hdmi redmere 10'cables (red fabric). I also just received a non active 17' hdmi from Pacroban. I just got off the phone with Monoprice and asked them if the older redmere chip in that cable was passing HDR. He said most likely not HDR10.

My LG OLED C8 tv acknowledges 4k HDR movie and asks me to confirm. I do, it activates HDR in the tv, that pop up disappears and the movie starts playing. Picture looks great, but how can I confirm that both the Monoprice and Pacroban (Pacroban doesn't say the cable passes HDR) are actually passing HDR10?

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post #5 of 23 Old 08-02-2018, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by bekindrewind View Post
I have some 2013 Monoprice hdmi redmere 10'cables (red fabric). I also just received a non active 17' hdmi from Pacroban. I just got off the phone with Monoprice and asked them if the older redmere chip in that cable was passing HDR. He said most likely not HDR10.

My LG OLED C8 tv acknowledges 4k HDR movie and asks me to confirm. I do, it activates HDR in the tv, that pop up disappears and the movie starts playing. Picture looks great, but how can I confirm that both the Monoprice and Pacroban (Pacroban doesn't say the cable passes HDR) are actually passing HDR10?
If you have an active cable with the Redmere chipsets in them from 2013 it's doubtful that it will pass HDR10 or DV because the embedded chipsets are 5 years old so they are behind the current technology (HDMI 2.0b). At 10' - 20' you don't even need an active cable because all it does is ensure that the signal can pass without issues past the maximum certifiable 25'.
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post #6 of 23 Old 08-05-2018, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
If you have an active cable with the Redmere chipsets in them from 2013 it's doubtful that it will pass HDR10 or DV because the embedded chipsets are 5 years old so they are behind the current technology (HDMI 2.0b). At 10' - 20' you don't even need an active cable because all it does is ensure that the signal can pass without issues past the maximum certifiable 25'.
Shouldn’t all HDMI 2.0 18gbps cables pass HDR?

OK, my question. When an HDMI cable is 2.0 18Gbps why wouldn’t it pass everything we have so far? Why is HDR a yes/no a deal breaker in the wire specs when the cables are not concerned about 2.0a or 2.0b hardware/devices.

My Monopricec 2013 2.0 18Gbps active cables pass HDR, even though it’s not listed, but deep color is. So why does it have to say HDR in the specs if deep color is listed in the specs of HDMI cables.

HDMI cable vs HDMI device can be confusing. The reference numbers of 1.4 (10.2 gbps), 2.0, 2.0a, 2.0b (18 gbps) and future 2.1 (24gbps) relate to devices/hardware. HDMI cables also reference 1.4 (10.2) and 2.0 (18 gbps) as what bandwidth they will pass. HDMI cables are not referenced as 2.0, 2.0a or 2.0b.

I found this article on Trusted Reviews, HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: What’s the difference?
https://www.trustedreviews.com/opini...vs-1-4-2913356

This references HDMI 2.0

“As 12-bit colour ramps-up the specificity of the colour information that goes into rendering an image, the total number of possible colours is 68.7 billion. That exponential ramping-up of data is what makes transporting 4K 12-bit such a data-heavy task.
These higher colour bit rates are often labelled “deep color”, so if you see that term you now know what it refers to. It’s this ability that unlocks High Dynamic Range, which gives you video information required to more and brighter colours.”

So, I’ll assume if a 2.0 HDMI cable passes “deep color” it also passes HDR?

Some companies (let say Monoprice) provide specs that say the cable is 2.0 18gbps. Some says HDR, some do not, when both support Deep Color?

Monoprice Ultra Slim Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable, [email protected], HDR, 18Gbps, 36AWG, YUV 4:4:4, 6ft, Black…(lists HDR) (Supports Deep Color, up to 16-bits per channel, including Sony's x.v.Color™ standard)
https://www.monoprice.com/product?c_...seq=1&format=2

Monoprice Ultra Slim Series Active High Speed HDMI Cable - 4K @ 60Hz, 18Gbps, 36AWG, YUV 4:2:0, 6ft, Black…(no mention of HDR and believe it has the newest active chip Spectral7, not redmere… but I’ll reference redmere in another paragraph ). (Supports Deep Color, up to 16-bits per channel, including Sony's x.v.Color standard)
https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=13590

Monoprice DynamicView Active High Speed HDMI Cable - 4K @ 60Hz, HDR, 18Gbps, 34AWG, YUV 4:4:4, CL2, 10ft, Black (lists HDR( (Supports Deep Color, up to 16-bits per channel, including Sony's x.v.Color™ standard)
https://www.monoprice.com/product?c_...seq=1&format=2

Does YUV have anything to do with HDR? Active YUV 4:2:0, Certified YUV 4:4:4, DynamicView YUV4:4:4

With that said, I have some Monoprice 2013 18Gbps 10 foot redmere cables with red fabric. It passes HDR, yet it’s not listed as being able to do so in the specs.

Some say, including Monoprice when I spoke with them on the phone, that my 2013 cables should not pass HDR because of the older redmere chip. The Spectal7 should which is in their new cables. Yet, Monoprices description for their Ultra Slim Series Active High Speed HDMI 18Gbps cable doesn’t reference support/passing HDR, however the DynamicView does?

Confusing?

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post #7 of 23 Old 08-05-2018, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by bekindrewind View Post
Shouldn’t all HDMI 2.0 18gbps cables pass HDR?

OK, my question. When an HDMI cable is 2.0 18Gbps why wouldn’t it pass everything we have so far? Why is HDR a yes/no a deal breaker in the wire specs when the cables are not concerned about 2.0a or 2.0b hardware/devices.

My Monopricec 2013 2.0 18Gbps active cables pass HDR, even though it’s not listed, but deep color is. So why does it have to say HDR in the specs if deep color is listed in the specs of HDMI cables.

HDMI cable vs HDMI device can be confusing. The reference numbers of 1.4 (10.2 gbps), 2.0, 2.0a, 2.0b (18 gbps) and future 2.1 (24gbps) relate to devices/hardware. HDMI cables also reference 1.4 (10.2) and 2.0 (18 gbps) as what bandwidth they will pass. HDMI cables are not referenced as 2.0, 2.0a or 2.0b.

I found this article on Trusted Reviews, HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: What’s the difference?
https://www.trustedreviews.com/opini...vs-1-4-2913356

This references HDMI 2.0

“As 12-bit colour ramps-up the specificity of the colour information that goes into rendering an image, the total number of possible colours is 68.7 billion. That exponential ramping-up of data is what makes transporting 4K 12-bit such a data-heavy task.
These higher colour bit rates are often labelled “deep color”, so if you see that term you now know what it refers to. It’s this ability that unlocks High Dynamic Range, which gives you video information required to more and brighter colours.”

So, I’ll assume if a 2.0 HDMI cable passes “deep color” it also passes HDR?

Some companies (let say Monoprice) provide specs that say the cable is 2.0 18gbps. Some says HDR, some do not, when both support Deep Color?

Monoprice Ultra Slim Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable, [email protected], HDR, 18Gbps, 36AWG, YUV 4:4:4, 6ft, Black…(lists HDR) (Supports Deep Color, up to 16-bits per channel, including Sony's x.v.Color™ standard)
https://www.monoprice.com/product?c_...seq=1&format=2

Monoprice Ultra Slim Series Active High Speed HDMI Cable - 4K @ 60Hz, 18Gbps, 36AWG, YUV 4:2:0, 6ft, Black…(no mention of HDR and believe it has the newest active chip Spectral7, not redmere… but I’ll reference redmere in another paragraph ). (Supports Deep Color, up to 16-bits per channel, including Sony's x.v.Color standard)
https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=13590

Monoprice DynamicView Active High Speed HDMI Cable - 4K @ 60Hz, HDR, 18Gbps, 34AWG, YUV 4:4:4, CL2, 10ft, Black (lists HDR( (Supports Deep Color, up to 16-bits per channel, including Sony's x.v.Color™ standard)
https://www.monoprice.com/product?c_...seq=1&format=2

Does YUV have anything to do with HDR? Active YUV 4:2:0, Certified YUV 4:4:4, DynamicView YUV4:4:4

With that said, I have some Monoprice 2013 18Gbps 10 foot redmere cables with red fabric. It passes HDR, yet it’s not listed as being able to do so in the specs.

Some say, including Monoprice when I spoke with them on the phone, that my 2013 cables should not pass HDR because of the older redmere chip. The Spectal7 should which is in their new cables. Yet, Monoprices description for their Ultra Slim Series Active High Speed HDMI 18Gbps cable doesn’t reference support/passing HDR, however the DynamicView does?

Confusing?
Confusing? Absolutely, but that't the mess that HDMI.org has left us with and one that we will be dealing with for a long time to come. Compounding that with the fact that cable mfrs/resellers have very misleading cable descriptions that are carefully worded with phrases "up to..", "compatible with...", "gold connectors", "oxygen-free copper", ad naseum, which further confuses the consumer.

First of all, there is no such thing as an HDMI 2.0 cable or any other "numbered" cable. That was a thing of the past and HDMI.org asked cable mfrs to stop labeling their cables with the hardware spec because it was too confusing for the consumer. If you have a cable that is labeled "HDMI 1.4" or whatever, it is an old cable.

What HDMI.org requires now is that all cable mfrs cable their cables as High Speed HDMI. There's also a Standard HDMI cable but everyone uses High Speed. In theory, most all High Speed labeled HDMI cables should meet all of the current HDMI 2.0b hardware (chipsets) protocols. By the way, fully compliant HDMI 2.1 will have a bandwidth of 48Gbps (not 24Gbps). What is not clear is how cable mfrs test and/or certify that a particular cable, at a given length, meets those protocols. Do they arbitrarily test 1 cable out of 1000, 1 out of 20, different lengths, and how do they actually test for compliance? Once tested, do they just "transfer" that testing result to an entire batch of cables and assume that it will hold true for various lengths? The only standardized testing for HDMI hardware compliance is the program setup by HDMI.org which uses ATC's (Authorized Testing Center). Any cable mfr can offer their cable up for testing by an ATC but the program is expensive so not everyone uses the ATC program. If the cable in question comes with a QR label (which we have mentioned many times) for authenticity, the consumer knows that the cable, regardless of mfr or reseller, has been tested by a standardized procedure designed and implemented by HDMI.org. But that's still not a 100% guarantee that the cable will work in a given setup.

In a perfect world, if you have a tv (device) and a blu-ray player (device), both having the current HDMI 2.0b hardware chipsets, and you use a Certified Premium High Speed HDMI cable, and your run is under 25'-30' (which is the current maximum distance for an ATC certification), you shouldn't have any problems meeting the current HDMI 2.0b protocols.

Go to HDMI.org if you haven't done so already and read up on what they list as the protocols supported by HDMI 2.0b. A lot of cable mfrs just list the HDMI 2.0b protocols without any clear evidence on how they determined that.

HDMI is backwards compatible, but only to the in-common protocols. So, if your source has the 2.0b chipset, but your sink has the 1.4a chipset, then you will only be able to access (decode) HDMI 1.4a protocols. The cable does not dictate which HDMI protocols can be used. That is done by the source and sink end. An active cable is designed to maintain signal integrity over the original 25' certifiable distance. Even if your cable has the current chipsets in the sink end, it's your source (blu-ray player for example) and your sink (tv) that determines what you can utilize. The cable is just the data pipe, it can't change the signal it carries.

So, HDMI hardware refers to the physical HDMI chipsets in your devices (tv, STB, BD player, etc) and is designated by the protocol version number. The cable is designated as High Speed HDMI but that designation is confusing because cable length, wire gauge, cable installation (bend radius for example) all play a part in whether a specific cable will work with a specific setup.

To say it's a mess is a huge understatement. Adding to that a lot of folks have built their HTS's, with long cable runs, around 1080i/p and had no problems whatsoever. But once they started to upgrade their equipment, but not the cables, problems occurred.
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post #8 of 23 Old 08-06-2018, 01:17 AM
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By the way, fully compliant HDMI 2.1 will have a bandwidth of 48Gbps (not 24Gbps).
Sorry, that was a typo, should have caught that. Correct 48Gbps.

So what's your thoughts about the 3 examples I provided about Monoprice specifying in their description if the cable passes HDR or not?
I was also under the assumption..The cable is just the data pipe, it can't change the signal it carries.

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post #9 of 23 Old 08-06-2018, 05:47 AM
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HDMI cable - as you say any 'passive' copper cable will not alter the Video or Audio signal it is transporting, at worst it will introduce enough voltage drop to cause the next device along the signal path a problem when it comes to locking too and processing the underlying Video and Audio signal.

Active HDMI cable - may or may not cause some alterations to the underlying Video and Audio signal (preferably not) plus the active chipset used may not support certain Features your Source and Sink (Display, AVR etc) do support.

RedMere/Spectral7 - has been pretty difficult to fathom out for a fair while now. The Vendors who use that supplier have struggled with recognition for Spectral7 so hung on to the RedMere brand way after the company/technology changed hands. Ideally any product which includes a RedMere or Spectral7 chipset would advertise which chipset is used and which Features it supports.

HDMI.org - have introduced 'Ultra High Speed' certification as the next step along the bandwidth tunnel, though you'll be hard pushed to find anything which meets that spec at this time.

https://www.hdmi.org/consumer/finding_right_cable.aspx

Joe

PS I think we have all come across 'Old' HDMI cables which oddly cater for recent Specification/Feature updates - even where the spec of the old cable suggests it should not.

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post #10 of 23 Old 08-06-2018, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Joe Fernand View Post

HDMI.org - have introduced 'Ultra High Speed' certification as the next step along the bandwidth tunnel, though you'll be hard pushed to find anything which meets that spec at this time.

https://www.hdmi.org/consumer/finding_right_cable.aspx

Joe

PS I think we have all come across 'Old' HDMI cables which oddly cater for recent Specification/Feature updates - even where the spec of the old cable suggests it should not.
Haven't been to HDMI.org for awhile so I missed the new HDMI cable category. I noticed it says "up to 48Gbps" and they haven't started certification of the cable yet unlike the Premium High Speed cable. I can just see what's going to happen once the new cable gets out into the wild. Do you know if they've trademarked the name "Ultra High Speed "? I bet the Chinese counterfeiters are starting to work overtime
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post #11 of 23 Old 08-07-2018, 05:39 AM
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'I bet the Chinese counterfeiters are starting to work overtime' - Apple/Belkin got in there early with the dodgy marketing
https://www.apple.com/uk/shop/produc...-hdmi-cable-2m

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post #12 of 23 Old 08-07-2018, 06:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Fernand View Post
'I bet the Chinese counterfeiters are starting to work overtime' - Apple/Belkin got in there early with the dodgy marketing
https://www.apple.com/uk/shop/produc...-hdmi-cable-2m

Joe
I have had two of these cables since November, 2017. They work fine for 18 Gbps. But I know of no way to test whether they work at 48 Gbps. It is premature to prepare for 48 Gbps.

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'It is premature to prepare for 48 Gbps' - other than conduit or invest multiple thousands of dollars in a test pattern generator its 'wait and see' for most folk.

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CONDUIT! CONDUIT! CONDUIT! is the mantra around here for cable runs longer than about 20' for 4k HDR and definitely for the future upcoming circus which will be called HDMI 2.1. As we get closer to October the smoke and mirror guys will be in full force with their "HDMI 2.1 compatible" and "works with...." cables to grab the Black Friday (or Week) folks who will buy into the marketing without doing any serious research on their own.
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post #15 of 23 Old 08-07-2018, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe Fernand View Post
'It is premature to prepare for 48 Gbps' - other than conduit or invest multiple thousands of dollars in a test pattern generator its 'wait and see' for most folk.

Joe
Correct, what I meant is that it is premature to buy cables said to be capable of 48 Gbps.
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Can someone make a recommendation for which Monoprice HDMI cable will be best for a short run? Longest cable 10', shortest 6', connecting a Blu-Ray, Apple 4K TV , Denon AVR and LG C8?


thanks and sorry for the newbie question, but I really appreciate the help this forum offers,
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post #17 of 23 Old 08-14-2018, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by erudolph View Post
Can someone make a recommendation for which Monoprice HDMI cable will be best for a short run? Longest cable 10', shortest 6', connecting a Blu-Ray, Apple 4K TV , Denon AVR and LG C8?


thanks and sorry for the newbie question, but I really appreciate the help this forum offers,
Ed
At those lengths, any Premium High Speed HDMI cable should be fine. Just make sure the certified cable comes with a QR label for authenticity. Be mindful of bend radius and remember that there are no 100% guarantees that any given cable with work with any given setup. The issue you described in your other post are more than likely not related to your cables.
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post #18 of 23 Old 08-23-2018, 01:37 PM
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HDR not being passed

OPPO UDP-203 4k player to Marantz AV7702mkII 4k processor to LGOLED65C8 4kTV

Using (2) 2013 Monoprice redmere 18Gbps 10ft hdmi passes HDR. (Call this cable A)
Using (2) 2018 Monoprice Ultra Slim Series Active High Speed HDMI Cable - 4K @ 60Hz, 18Gbps, 36AWG, YUV 4:2:0, 15ft, Black https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=13590 does not pass HDR. (Call this cable B)
Using (2) non active 18Gbps high speed generic hdmi passes HDR. (Call this cable C)

Here’s the confusing part.
B will pass SDR from Oppo to Marantz when using A,B,C Marantz to LG.
B will pass HDR from Marantz to LG.
B will pass HDR from Oppo to LG.
B will not pass HDR from Oppo to Marantz (no video at all) when using A,B,C Marantz to LG.

Spoke to Monoprice about this. Interesting they said. B cable should not pass HDR at all.
Also said A cable should not pass HDR either, chips too old. (Yet it passes everything I throw at it.)

B does pass HDR from Oppo to LG.
B does pass HDR from Marantz to LG.
B doesn’t pass HDR from Oppo to Marantz ?

Spoke to Marantz, did a factory reset, didn’t fix it.

Was under the impression all high speed 18Gbps hdmi cables should pass HDR10 and Dolby vision, depending on length. Found this on the web from CNET:

HDMI cables are just a dumb pipe. They don't care (to an extent) what you send through them. There is no such thing as an "HDR HDMI" cable or an "HDMI 2.0" cable. That second one is important. HDMI cables don't have version numbers. The connections have version numbers. So your TV might be "HDMI 2.0a" (and indeed needs to be for HDR), but the cable you plug into it doesn't have a number. It's just an HDMI cable.

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post #19 of 23 Old 08-23-2018, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by bekindrewind View Post

Was under the impression all high speed 18Gbps hdmi cables should pass HDR10 and Dolby vision, depending on length. Found this on the web from CNET:

HDMI cables are just a dumb pipe. They don't care (to an extent) what you send through them. There is no such thing as an "HDR HDMI" cable or an "HDMI 2.0" cable. That second one is important. HDMI cables don't have version numbers. The connections have version numbers. So your TV might be "HDMI 2.0a" (and indeed needs to be for HDR), but the cable you plug into it doesn't have a number. It's just an HDMI cable.
We've been saying this for years on here. The HDMI cable is just a data pipe. It can not do anything to the signal other than transmit it hopefully without any errors. 4k HDR is really finicky when it comes to cable distance, wire gauge, and installation (bend radius). There are no chipsets in HDMI (passive) cables. The cables that do have chipsets in the sink end are active cables, and the chipsets are there for error correction, timing, etc. The active cables do really nothing more than increase the reliability of the signal past the magical 25' mark. Active cables work great for long run 1080p connections. 4k HDR, not so much. However, for full compatibility with your devices the chipsets should be up to the current HDMI 2.0b hardware specifications if you don't want any issues. That's the problem with active cables is that you really never know which HDMI chipset versions are installed in the sink end (tv side). And, like any other electronic device, the chipsets can fail over time. Not likely, but it is a possibility. All of your connected devices also need to have the current HDMI 2.0b chipsets in them, source to sink. If not, the compatible protocols will "fall back" to the common protocol set. A tv that has HDMI 2.0a hardware can not process all of the data that a blu-ray player with the HDMI 2.0b chipsets transmit, and vice versa.

AWG36 in one of the cables above is a really thin wire so that's not surprising. The cable in question is also not an ATC Certified cable so it's anybody's guess as to how the specifications given were tested and verified. An ATC Certification is not a 100% guarantee but at least you know that it was tested and certified by a standardized testing program designed and certified by HDMI.org.

For a 10' run, I'd just purchase a passive Premium High Speed HDMI cable (one with the QR label for authenticity) with maybe a wire gauge of AWG26 or 28. An active cable would probably just be a waste of money. Just be mindful of the bend radius when connecting to your tv or receiver and make sure there isn't any undo strain on the HDMI inputs. Keep you connections simple, source to sink, and try to avoid switches. As we have said many times before, there are no guarantees based on a cable mfr's claims that any given cable is going to work in your system. It's still pretty much trial and error. If you can verify that all of your sources and sinks have the current HDMI 2.0b chipsets in them, then you shouldn't have any issues. If you do, look at how your cable run is setup. HDMI in general sucks but that's what we're stuck with.
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post #20 of 23 Old 08-23-2018, 08:27 PM
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^^ Thanks Otto.

Oppo, Marantz, Lg, all 2.0a or b. Must be because they are passing HDR.
Still confused why the Oppo to Marantz will not work as described.

Reason I'm going with active cables is because my sister is mounting her Sony 900F on the fireplace. I'm trying to get her as thin an hdmi as possible, so it can be run in-between the bricks, along the mortar. The fireplace thickness from the wall is one brick. The hdmi cable needs to make 2 ninety degree angles to meet the wall. Then down the side of the fireplace, another 90 degree turn at the baseboard. Distance from the tv to the entertainment cabinet is 13 feet. So she needs a 15ft cable.

I'm ordering the cables for her to confirm they will work by trying them on my system. I keep finding these weird situations I described above.

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post #21 of 23 Old 08-24-2018, 09:33 AM
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@bekindrewind - multiple 90 degree bends on a thin cable is no bueno, especially for 4k HDR and quite possibly for 1080p as well. You're almost guaranteed to have issues, if not at initial installation certainly later. The bend radius may also play havoc with the active portion of the cable. All you can do is lay the cable on the floor before snaking it around the fireplace. Test it thoroughly. If it works, you're good to go. If it doesn't work after you've installed it you have your answer. I've never been a fan of wall mounting panels over fireplaces because it's usually not an easy process unless you figure out a way to run conduit, which usually requires and good electrician and probably some sheet rocking/painting afterwards.
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post #22 of 23 Old 08-24-2018, 06:36 PM
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Thanks Otto, I've said it before and it's worth mentioning again. It's nice to have guys like you chime in, not only for your knowledge, but also that you reply so promptly. Cheers!

All good points you've made. I'll point out to my sister, she's in TX, I'm in CA, that when she has someone mount the tv on her fireplace (she doesn't use the fireplace) to run the cables in the indented grout and when it comes to the end of the bricks, don't make a sharp right angle. Let the cable, do a small radius curve down the side of a couple bricks then into a plastic wire holder that gets double sided taped to the wall next to the brick. Same at the baseboard, short radius curve, no stress on the cable.

She not a perfectionist like me (lucky her) and doesn't mind the cable showing in between the bricks and down the side of the fireplace. Same with running an extension cord. Which I should ask this question.

The 2 prong power cord coming out of the tv (Sony 75" 900F) needs an extension. Would a cheap lamp wire style, I believe 16awg, extension cord be ok to use? It's small enough to run between the bricks, into the cable management plastic tube, to the power strip.

No conduit, no electrician, no sheet rock and painting. She's happy with just running the wires out in the open, sort of.

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post #23 of 23 Old 08-25-2018, 01:09 AM
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'when she has someone mount the tv on her fireplace' - use an experienced Installer who can supply, verify and guarantee the installation (Inc. cables), that way you have someone local on hand if there are any issues.

Joe

PS LG TV - if you are using multiple HDMI Inputs on the TV have you ensured WCG is enabled on all Inputs - often the default is only one Input has WCG enabled.

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