Looking for 35’ hdmi -do I need fiber optic? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 10:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Looking for 35’ hdmi -do I need fiber optic?

I’m only using 1080p now. But I would not mind being a little future proof. Which active hdmi cables are the best choice? Whatever I choose, it has to have a lifetime warranty. Monoprice requires you to ship the defective cable back to them and takes weeks to get you a new one.
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 10:56 AM
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I've read the Redmere HDMI cables are good for longer lengths. Non-Active cables that length may consistently do the trick for 720p and 1080p, but if you plan to go 4K they may be iffy. Shortening the length via routing would be a better solution, if possible.
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post #3 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 11:06 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by kjfalls View Post
I've read the Redmere HDMI cables are good for longer lengths. Non-Active cables that length may consistently do the trick for 720p and 1080p, but if you plan to go 4K they may be iffy. Shortening the length via routing would be a better solution, if possible.
This redmere cable is surprising cheap.
AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable, 35 Feet, 1-Pack with RedMere https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01JH70GBY..._db5VBb151955E

Supposedly the newer redmere cables are now “Specta7”. The amazon cable is worth a try. Thanks.
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post #4 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yakapo View Post
I’m only using 1080p now. But I would not mind being a little future proof. Which active hdmi cables are the best choice? Whatever I choose, it has to have a lifetime warranty. Monoprice requires you to ship the defective cable back to them and takes weeks to get you a new one.
The ONLY way to "future proof" your cabling over long distances is to install your cable in a conduit. Video technology is still far outpacing connection technology so the likelihood of changing cables is very real down the road. Lifetime warranties are pretty much useless if you plan on exchanging the "defective" cable for the same one, if the mfr still offers it. There is more to a successful cable run than just the cable. Bend radius, wire gauge, the use of extenders/adapters, etc can all affect the signal path.

1080p is not a problem with cable runs over 25' (which is the current maximum certifiable distance). Active cables (Redmere) have a chipset in the sink end that draws a little power from the HDMI input for error correction, timing, etc which allows for longer runs without any signal degradation. Spectra 7 chipsets are the new chipsets so they should be able to keep up better with the newer video standards but even so, they are electronic devices so they can fail overtime or develop issues. They do nothing for pq because the cable is just a data pipe, and the active portions is just to extend the cable length, to a point. You either get the signal intact or not. For 1080p, a Premium High Speed HDMI cable, passive or active, should work just fine. The "Premium" means that the cable has been certified by an ATC as meeting all HDMI 2.0b hardware specifications. The cable will come with a QR label for authenticity.

4k HDR and beyond is much more difficult because the demands of the higher video technologies really push the limits of copper-based cables. A lot of folks start having issues at around the 20' mark. This is not absolute because some have good results beyond that, but not by much. The use of extenders, adapters, etc can help but anytime you introduce a "break" between source and sink, you can introduce issues. The best connection is a single run, source to sink.

HDMI 2.1, once commercially available, currently has a maximum cable length of 1 to 3 meters (3' to 9') for full compliance at 48Gbps. That basically sucks but such is HDMI. Hopefully the distance limitation will get worked out once HDMI 2.1 chipsets are installed in the newer devices. But all of your devices will need to have the newest chipsets as well for fully compliant HDMI 2.1.

If you don't have any plans on upgrading to 4k HDR anytime soon, then a well made passive High Speed HDMI cable from Monoprice, Blue Jeans, MediaBridge should work just fine. If you are thinking on upgrading soon, then you might want to consider a hybrid fiber cable from someone like Ruipro. They are expensive but should give you more mileage than a copper-based only cable. But this all comes back to the mantra of CONDUIT CONDUIT CONDUIT. However, if your cable run is easily accessible (on the floor, behind furniture, what ever) then you're fine without a conduit. In-wall installations should be done with a conduit without reservations. No wall plates either.

Cable mfrs will make all kinds of carefully worded claims that make their cables sound like they are the best made and will "guarantee" that you won't have any issues. That is just plain marketing b.s.
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Last edited by Otto Pylot; 10-11-2018 at 01:13 PM.
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post #5 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 01:12 PM
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I've never had an issue w/Monoprice cables:
https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=12735

Vinyl, tape, digital... I don't care as long as I can listen to my music...
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 04:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
The ONLY way to "future proof" your cabling over long distances is to install your cable in a conduit. Video technology is still far outpacing connection technology so the likelihood of changing cables is very real down the road. Lifetime warranties are pretty much useless if you plan on exchanging the "defective" cable for the same one, if the mfr still offers it. There is more to a successful cable run than just the cable. Bend radius, wire gauge, the use of extenders/adapters, etc can all affect the signal path.

1080p is not a problem with cable runs over 25' (which is the current maximum certifiable distance). Active cables (Redmere) have a chipset in the sink end that draws a little power from the HDMI input for error correction, timing, etc which allows for longer runs without any signal degradation. Spectra 7 chipsets are the new chipsets so they should be able to keep up better with the newer video standards but even so, they are electronic devices so they can fail overtime or develop issues. They do nothing for pq because the cable is just a data pipe, and the active portions is just to extend the cable length, to a point. You either get the signal intact or not. For 1080p, a Premium High Speed HDMI cable, passive or active, should work just fine. The "Premium" means that the cable has been certified by an ATC as meeting all HDMI 2.0b hardware specifications. The cable will come with a QR label for authenticity.

4k HDR and beyond is much more difficult because the demands of the higher video technologies really push the limits of copper-based cables. A lot of folks start having issues at around the 20' mark. This is not absolute because some have good results beyond that, but not by much. The use of extenders, adapters, etc can help but anytime you introduce a "break" between source and sink, you can introduce issues. The best connection is a single run, source to sink.

HDMI 2.1, once commercially available, currently has a maximum cable length of 1 to 3 meters (3' to 9') for full compliance at 48Gbps. That basically sucks but such is HDMI. Hopefully the distance limitation will get worked out once HDMI 2.1 chipsets are installed in the newer devices. But all of your devices will need to have the newest chipsets as well for fully compliant HDMI 2.1.

If you don't have any plans on upgrading to 4k HDR anytime soon, then a well made passive High Speed HDMI cable from Monoprice, Blue Jeans, MediaBridge should work just fine. If you are thinking on upgrading soon, then you might want to consider a hybrid fiber cable from someone like Ruipro. They are expensive but should give you more mileage than a copper-based only cable. But this all comes back to the mantra of CONDUIT CONDUIT CONDUIT. However, if your cable run is easily accessible (on the floor, behind furniture, what ever) then you're fine without a conduit. In-wall installations should be done with a conduit without reservations. No wall plates either.

Cable mfrs will make all kinds of carefully worded claims that make their cables sound like they are the best made and will "guarantee" that you won't have any issues. That is just plain marketing b.s.
Thanks for the detailed response. We decided to move the projector all the way to the back of the room, so I’ll get the 50’ redmere. If it doesn’t work, I’ll just get the fiber cable.
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 05:33 PM
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Originally Posted by yakapo View Post
Thanks for the detailed response. We decided to move the projector all the way to the back of the room, so I’ll get the 50’ redmere. If it doesn’t work, I’ll just get the fiber cable.
The 50' Redmere will probably work for 1080p but make sure you install conduit for your cable run. Even with a hybrid fiber, you may still encounter issues if and when you move up to 4k HDR. The Ruipro should work for that but nothing is guaranteed. 50' is a long run so you need to be aware of bend radius as well. Using the conduit should help with the bend radius.
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 05:55 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
The 50' Redmere will probably work for 1080p but make sure you install conduit for your cable run. Even with a hybrid fiber, you may still encounter issues if and when you move up to 4k HDR. The Ruipro should work for that but nothing is guaranteed. 50' is a long run so you need to be aware of bend radius as well. Using the conduit should help with the bend radius.
It’s only $30. If I go 4k, I’ll just buy another cable. I’ve given up on being 4k ready.

When you say “conduit” do you mean like a narrow pvc pipe that keeps the cable from cinching?
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post #9 of 9 Old 10-11-2018, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by yakapo View Post
It’s only $30. If I go 4k, I’ll just buy another cable. I’ve given up on being 4k ready.

When you say “conduit” do you mean like a narrow pvc pipe that keeps the cable from cinching?
There are lots of different kinds of conduit you can use and yes, a pvc pipe would suffice. A flexible conduit would be better. 1.5" to 2.0" would be the ideal diameter. You can also install some solid core CAT-6 cable (non-CCS and not CAT-6 ethernet patch cable) for future use for either extending an ethernet connection with punchdown keystone jacks, or to extend an HDMI connection via HDBT. Also, installing a pull string makes pulling new cable thru much easier.
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