Recommend an HDMI 2.1/ 8K cable? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 4 Old 10-29-2019, 10:09 AM - Thread Starter
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Recommend an HDMI 2.1/ 8K cable?

I'm unhooking my entire system next week to paint the room, and I figured I'd upgrade my in-wall HDMI cable while I'm at it... since it is literally the most difficult piece of my entire system to replace!

I normally get my cables from Monoprice, but the only 10 ft. 48 Gbps cable I'm seeing on their website is $190! And I'm just not paying that...

I see quite a few "8K HDMI 2.1" cables on Amazon, but it's hard to know if those are legit. Anyone got a recommendation? 8 - 10 ft. would do it. Thanks!

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post #2 of 4 Old 10-29-2019, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by davidag02 View Post
I'm unhooking my entire system next week to paint the room, and I figured I'd upgrade my in-wall HDMI cable while I'm at it... since it is literally the most difficult piece of my entire system to replace!

I normally get my cables from Monoprice, but the only 10 ft. 48 Gbps cable I'm seeing on their website is $190! And I'm just not paying that...

I see quite a few "8K HDMI 2.1" cables on Amazon, but it's hard to know if those are legit. Anyone got a recommendation? 8 - 10 ft. would do it. Thanks!
There are no certified/validated/properly tested HDMI cables that meet the HDMI 2.1 (48Gbps) feature sets. The main reason being that there are no consumer devices that are validated for HDMI 2.1 yet to test on. It's easy for a cable mfr to put some sort of pattern generator on their cable, show that it can transmit at 48Gbps, and then assume it will transmit the HDMI 2.1 feature sets that require 48Gbps without any errors. Unfortunately you're stuck with the high cost of a cable. Any cable mfr that claims 8k HDR (Ultra High Speed HDMI, 48Gbps) cable is suspicious at this point in time.

The basic recommendation is this:

For 4k HDR at cable lengths under about 20', a Premium High Speed HDMI cabel (with the QR label for authenticity) should work.
For 4k HDR at cable lengths over about 20', hybrid fiber cable (Ruipro4k) is recommended.

HDMI.org states in their HDMI 2.1 documentation that 1m - 3m (3' - 9') is that maximum length for HDMI 2.1 and a passive cable. You're right at the maximum length if you plan on HDMI 2.1 in the future. However, you need to give your cabling slack so that you can adequately and safely make your connections without any undo stress on the HDMI input or excessive bend radius. A passive cable for 4k HDR/8k HDR will probably have a thick wire gauge so there will be considerable loss of flexibility. If it were me I'd install a 3m - 5m hybrid fiber cable to give yourself plenty of room to work with because you want a direct connection between source and sink. No adapters, extenders, wall plates, etc in-between your source and sink. 4k HDR is really finicky with its connections and when/if you move up to HDMI 2.1, that will become even more important.

The best thing you can possibly do, if your cabling is in-wall, is to install your cables in a 1.5" - 2.0" conduit (Smurf tube is one example). That is the ONLY way to future proof your cabling because chances are you will be swapping out the cables in the future. Connection technology always lags behind video technology so what works now for HDMI 2.0 may not work well for HDMI 2.1 once it is widely available (along with source material). Installing your cable(s) in a conduit, with a pull string, makes for swapping out your cables so much easier, safer, and you can control the bend radius much better. The use of a pull string is critical because you don't want to be pulling on the connector ends of any type of cable, be it copper-only, fiber, or hybrid fiber.

HDMI 2.0 is standardized around 18Gbps. Even if you have a cable that can truly transmit at 48Gbps, the HDMI chipsets in the source and sink end will control what video/audio formats are available to you at 18Gbps. Some HDMI 2.1 feature sets are already available on HDMI 2.0 chips (eARC and VRR) because they don't require the full 48Gbps bandwidth.

Bottom line, install conduit with a pull string, what ever cable you decide to go with make sure you pay attention to bend radius and give yourself enough slack at the source/sink ends. I wouldn't worry about 48Gbps (8k cables) at this point in time until consumer devices are available with HDMI 2.1 chipsets that are capable of the full feature sets and HDMI cables are in the hands of consumers that have been used in actual consumer setups. A hybrid fiber cable probably is what is ultimately going to be needed because passive copper-only has it limitations and fiber or hybrid fiber (preferably) is what is going to prove to be reliable (longevity).
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post #3 of 4 Old 10-29-2019, 11:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Bottom line, install conduit with a pull string, what ever cable you decide to go with make sure you pay attention to bend radius and give yourself enough slack at the source/sink ends. I wouldn't worry about 48Gbps (8k cables) at this point in time until consumer devices are available with HDMI 2.1 chipsets that are capable of the full feature sets and HDMI cables are in the hands of consumers that have been used in actual consumer setups. A hybrid fiber cable probably is what is ultimately going to be needed because passive copper-only has it limitations and fiber or hybrid fiber (preferably) is what is going to prove to be reliable (longevity).
Wow... thank you for the detailed response! Fortunately I do have conduit behind the wall which does make pulling the cable much easier. Since I'm pulling everything apart for the room painting, I figured now would be a good time to pull a new cable so that I don't have to redo it when HDMI 2.1 stuff starts coming out. If cables that meet those specs don't currently exist (or are cost prohibitive), then I'll just wait because what I currently have in the wall is doing just fine with [email protected] Thanks again.

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post #4 of 4 Old 10-29-2019, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by davidag02 View Post
Wow... thank you for the detailed response! Fortunately I do have conduit behind the wall which does make pulling the cable much easier. Since I'm pulling everything apart for the room painting, I figured now would be a good time to pull a new cable so that I don't have to redo it when HDMI 2.1 stuff starts coming out. If cables that meet those specs don't currently exist (or are cost prohibitive), then I'll just wait because what I currently have in the wall is doing just fine with [email protected] Thanks again.
Then I'd leave well enough alone for now. If you don't have a pull string installed you might want to consider adding that. You can always use the existing cable as a pull string. If you have space, I'd leave the old cable in place and then test the new cable after installation to make sure it works well, just in case. It's also a good idea to lay any new cable out on the floor and test it thoroughly before installing it in-wall. If it doesn't work as expected after testing and installing, then something happened during the installation process.

Once there are cables that have been fully tested and proven to work in consumer devices for HDMI 2.1, they will probably be hybrid fiber and will be expensive .

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