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post #1 of 4 Old 05-09-2020, 03:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Future proofing with HDMI 2.1

Stuck at home I purchased a 75 foot monoprice HDMI 2.1 fiber optic cable to run from my gaming PC and opened up my ceiling. Should I:

Run the cable to the receiver and hope I can upgrade there to a 2.1 HDMI receiver in the not too distant future?

Run the cable direct to the TV where I plan on upgrading to a LG OLED or a Samsung 8k and trust in eARC?

Thanks in advance!

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post #2 of 4 Old 05-09-2020, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by cactus12 View Post
Stuck at home I purchased a 75 foot monoprice HDMI 2.1 fiber optic cable to run from my gaming PC and opened up my ceiling. Should I:

Run the cable to the receiver and hope I can upgrade there to a 2.1 HDMI receiver in the not too distant future?

Run the cable direct to the TV where I plan on upgrading to a LG OLED or a Samsung 8k and trust in eARC?

Thanks in advance!

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There are no certified cables for the complete HDMI 2.1 options sets, especially at 75', regardless of what the cable mfr lists in their marketing and product literature.


The ONLY way to future proof is to run your cabling in a 1.5" - 2.0" conduit. Video technology will always outpace connection technology to so you need a safe and easy way to replace/upgrade your cabling when the time comes. Besides, there is no way of knowing how a cable purchased today, especially at 75', is going to work once devices are in consumers hands that have HDMI 2.1 chipsets that are certified for all of the HDMI 2.1 option sets. The cable is just the data pipe. It cannot alter or modify the data that is being sent from source to sink.


4k HDR is very finicky with its connections so the most reliable connection is source to sink, with no wall plates, adapters, extenders, etc in-between.


A 48Gbps cable right now is all marketing because there are very few consumer devices that can transmit at that bandwidth, nor is their source material available that requires that. HDMI 2.0 is standardized to 18Gbps so even if you had a cable that could handle 48Gbps it is meaningless.


Distance is going to be your biggest issue, especially for eARC. For those that can currently do eARC (which is possible on the HDMI 2.0 chipsets), 50' seems to be about the maximum reliable distance. Hybrid fiber cables, which are active, are your best bet (Ruipro4k and the coming 8k cable) but even then, you may need to use a voltage inserter if issues occur.


Whatever you do lay the cable out on the floor first and thoroughly test it before installing to make sure it meets your needs.


No cable can offer you a 100% guarantee that it will work with all setups and installation schemes so just remember that. 75' is gonna be tough.

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post #3 of 4 Old 05-10-2020, 03:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
There are no certified cables for the complete HDMI 2.1 options sets, especially at 75', regardless of what the cable mfr lists in their marketing and product literature.


The ONLY way to future proof is to run your cabling in a 1.5" - 2.0" conduit. Video technology will always outpace connection technology to so you need a safe and easy way to replace/upgrade your cabling when the time comes. Besides, there is no way of knowing how a cable purchased today, especially at 75', is going to work once devices are in consumers hands that have HDMI 2.1 chipsets that are certified for all of the HDMI 2.1 option sets. The cable is just the data pipe. It cannot alter or modify the data that is being sent from source to sink.


4k HDR is very finicky with its connections so the most reliable connection is source to sink, with no wall plates, adapters, extenders, etc in-between.


A 48Gbps cable right now is all marketing because there are very few consumer devices that can transmit at that bandwidth, nor is their source material available that requires that. HDMI 2.0 is standardized to 18Gbps so even if you had a cable that could handle 48Gbps it is meaningless.


Distance is going to be your biggest issue, especially for eARC. For those that can currently do eARC (which is possible on the HDMI 2.0 chipsets), 50' seems to be about the maximum reliable distance. Hybrid fiber cables, which are active, are your best bet (Ruipro4k and the coming 8k cable) but even then, you may need to use a voltage inserter if issues occur.


Whatever you do lay the cable out on the floor first and thoroughly test it before installing to make sure it meets your needs.


No cable can offer you a 100% guarantee that it will work with all setups and installation schemes so just remember that. 75' is gonna be tough.
Thank you for the reply.
I'm aware of the limitations with the cable and to what level I'm actually future proofing. But not going to have this kind of free time (hopefully) any time soon. They don't even have a video card that can output 4k/120 over HDMI yet. I guess I'm just trying to predict how these products will develop. I agree that right now for video it's safer to go straight to TV. Not going to do eARC with it, just sending audio/video from PC to either TV or receiver. Have the ceiling open, at the fork in the road point for one or the other and still deciding which way to go.
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post #4 of 4 Old 05-10-2020, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by cactus12 View Post
Thank you for the reply.
I'm aware of the limitations with the cable and to what level I'm actually future proofing. But not going to have this kind of free time (hopefully) any time soon. They don't even have a video card that can output 4k/120 over HDMI yet. I guess I'm just trying to predict how these products will develop. I agree that right now for video it's safer to go straight to TV. Not going to do eARC with it, just sending audio/video from PC to either TV or receiver. Have the ceiling open, at the fork in the road point for one or the other and still deciding which way to go.

If the ceiling is open, just install a conduit with a pull string. Again being mindful of where your bends will be. However the cable games play out, you'll at least have a relatively easy way to install/upgrade your cabling when the time comes.


For us, we don't use the SmartApps on our tv but prefer to stream via an AppleTV4k. So all of our connections go thru a receiver first, which is the hub of our HTS's, and then off to the display device. For cable tv, which is local HDTV (HD-1080) stations only, we just use an optical cable from the tv to the receiver for 5.1 audio, which is all the local HDTV stations provide.

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