Recommendations for New SPL Meter? - Page 2 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #31 of 37 Old 05-22-2019, 11:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewizard View Post
Already did that, on each battery contact there are two solder joint, I re-soldered both. Though they looked pretty good.


I think I have one of those 9v battery leads laying around, I might give that a try.

Thanks.

Steve/bluewizard
Probably not on the battery connector, but someplace else, from the pressure from the battery or whatever pressing on the PCB when you shut the case. With it apart try pressing and flexing gently on the battery leads and PCB to see if it goes on and off.
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"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #32 of 37 Old 05-22-2019, 11:49 AM
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This might be of interest to some considering using the Radio Shack SPL meters for infrasonic bass measurements:

"The Radio Shack meter is a wonderful unit. About a two and a half years ago, I did a calibration curve for the RS meter using lab equipment, with Eric Busch from DLC Design adding the low bass down to 10 Hz. This was published in PSACS Sound Bytes in two issues. These are the corrections that should be added to the meter readout
in order to achieve the correct SPL. These corrections are only valid for the meter set to C weighting, using 1/3 octave pink noise (easily available from various CDs), with the mic pointed at the speaker.

Both my analog meters and my digital meter measured the same in October, 1996. These are corrections, they are to be added to the meter readout for the correct response in dB SPL.

10Hz +20.5
12.5Hz +16.5
16Hz +11.5
20Hz +7.5
25Hz +5
31.5Hz +3
40Hz +2.5
50Hz +1.5
63Hz +1.5
80Hz +1.5
100Hz +2 "

Source


Personally, I'd look elsewhere for such infrasonic applications.

edit to add: https://www.avsforum.com/forum/113-s...ml#post5120500

Last edited by m. zillch; 05-22-2019 at 12:05 PM.
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post #33 of 37 Old 05-22-2019, 01:15 PM
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post #34 of 37 Old 05-22-2019, 05:19 PM
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Note the vast majority of (fairly) inexpensive SPL meters are C-weighted and roll off below 31.5 Hz and above 8 kHz. Wikipedia, the OSHA site, and many acoustics handbooks have the curves so you could reverse-engineer the compensation if you wish. As @m. zillch said it is best used above (and below) cut-off. I use an SPL meter to gauge absolute and relative levels using either pink noise or specific test tones. The only thing I do with a sub is to check the crossover frequency so don;t take my SPL meter below about 60 Hz. If you want wideband frequency accuracy use a measurement mic (or compensated UMIK-1 or whatever) and REW or whatever.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A-weighting

It is probably also worth the reminder that OSHA loudness levels are not meant for audiophiles and/or musicians. Per their definitions (see their website), they are intended to ensure (hopefully) normal conversations can be heard as you age. They are basically meant to keep you able to hear and understand a conversation (voice band), not that you'll be able to hear music like you used to.

FWIWFM - Don

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post #35 of 37 Old 05-22-2019, 10:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonH50 View Post
...

It is probably also worth the reminder that OSHA loudness levels are not meant for audiophiles and/or musicians. Per their definitions (see their website), they are intended to ensure (hopefully) normal conversations can be heard as you age. They are basically meant to keep you able to hear and understand a conversation (voice band), not that you'll be able to hear music like you used to.

FWIWFM - Don
Yes. After all, it is most important to be able to communicate with people and not so much to enjoy music.
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post #36 of 37 Old 05-22-2019, 10:35 PM
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Another safety tip: SPL meters often show (say) "the average level over the course of the past half second" whereas the super loud, and dangerous ~160 dBSPL blast from a gunshot is a transient lasting a tiny fraction of a second and can cause permanent NIHL [noise induced hearing loss] yet the run-of-the-mill SPL meter will only show a much smaller value from the event because it is a small percentage of that second/half second averaged interval.

You can test for this with a hand clap. Using the NIOSH app on my iphone a single hand clap (close to the standard mic) shot the reading up about 40 dB. Quick repeated claps, however, brought it up 60 dB. Were my repeated claps any louder? No. It shows that a single loud transient is not successfully registered, at least when used in the default, standard mode. [It has all sorts of interesting alternative modes which might be better suited to such a task of properly registering peaks]:

Last edited by m. zillch; 05-22-2019 at 10:43 PM.
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post #37 of 37 Old 05-23-2019, 12:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post
Another safety tip: SPL meters often show (say) "the average level over the course of the past half second" whereas the super loud, and dangerous ~160 dBSPL blast from a gunshot is a transient lasting a tiny fraction of a second and can cause permanent NIHL [noise induced hearing loss] ....
That was one thing I liked about the Radio Shack Digital Meter, while is had a numeric display that was reasonably fast, it had bar-graph that was much faster, and you could more easily determine peak sounds from that. The Ranges, another nice feature, centered on the selected dB, for example 70db, but were ±10db. To some that might seem a drawback, but it always worked well for me.


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