What Movie Production Companies does Netflix NOT carry? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 9 Old 10-24-2019, 08:05 AM - Thread Starter
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Question What Movie Production Companies does Netflix NOT carry?

With apple and disney services starting soon, I'm considering dropping HBO, Showtime, Cinemax and Starz from my cable and start using Netfilx for most movies. But I know Netflix does not have agreements with all major studios. I'm not talking about a list of available movies, but rather movie production companies like Warner Bros, 20th Century Fox. Of course Netflix does not have this info, and I could not find it in any search.


If I did this change, which movie production companies would I need to stream movies via alternate methods (Amazon, Fandango)? Which movie production companies do not have agreements with Netfilx?
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-24-2019, 08:07 AM
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I know they are fazing out Disney and Marvel because of Disney +. Not sure about others.
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post #3 of 9 Old 10-24-2019, 09:27 AM
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Apple TV+ appears to be original productions or acquired films. It doesn’t appear that they would be pulling any studio licensing rights away from Netflix.

HBO has had there own streaming service for a while, purportedly releasing a new buffed up version. So they not likely to have an effect on Netflix.

CBS All Access has been around for a little bit, not sure that they will effect Netflix going further either.

Netflix is moving toward original content more than they are toward aquiring licensing from studios.... Netflix is expected to spend 15 Billion on content in 2020.

Supposedly NBC is going too start a streaming service called Peacock....
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post #4 of 9 Old 10-24-2019, 05:03 PM
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Studios license their content under two categories...The ''Pay 1 Window'' is the period that new theatrical films are licensed to pay tv services (HBO, Showtime and yes Netflix). This begins 4 to 6 months after a film arrives on home video, and the availability period has usually averages 5-6 years for the service that hold the pay tv rights-but varies and is not continuous for the entire 5-6 yrs (normally after 2 years of a recent films debut on pay tv, the film is removed from that service and is licensed to basic cable networks. After a year or 2 on basic cable that film returns to the pay channel/service in... The ''Pay 2 Window''. Same, recent films, returning to the service that 1st aired/streamed it.



Then there are the ''Library Titles''. Movies that have passed thru Pay 1 & 2 windows and are licensed non exclusively to both pay tv and basic cable, rotating round and round, from one to another...


HBO owned by Time Warner-now ATT, gets Warner Bros new/recent films, plus WB owned New Line Cinema, and has newer titles from 20th Century Fox under a long term exclusive license. Universal's newer movies are also licensed to HBO...



Starz is now owned by Lionsgate, and it has recent Sony/Columbia movies. Lionsgate's new/recent films are currently licensed to...


Epix, formerly owned by Lionsgate, Paramount and MGM, and now solely owned by MGM (PAR sold off its stake last year, as did LG after buying Starz). Epix carries recent films from its former parents, but will lose Lionsgate theatricals to HBO when its current deal expires. (odd that they would bypass their own Starz in favor of HBO, but its a 2 year deal, so short term cash grab before adding them to Starz most likely)


Showtime (owns The Movie Channel, and Flix), is owned by CBS, and has exclusive rights to...CBS Films, IFC Films, STX Ent, Global Road Ent, and Amblin(?) Can't think of any Amblin title off the top of my head. .



Amazon. Amazon licenses a package of films controlled by Epix. Epix sells the same package of movies to Hulu as well. These movies run on Epix first, and then several (used to be 90 days back when Netflix also carried them) months later, provided to the other 2.



Hulu, formerly owned by Fox, Comcast/NBC, Disney with Time Warner buying in a few years ago, is now under full Disney control. Their main movie offerings have been thru the Epix deal mentioned. Plus they carried The Criterion Collection. Not sure if they still do with Criterion wanting to launch their own streamer after the demise of Filmstruck, co owned by Time Warner.


And lastly, Disney+, which will carry their recent theatricals starting with Captain Marvel. Disney films currently on Netflix will remain until their pay tv rights laspe (individually, one at a time- they all won't get Thanos snapped away at the same time. They'll also return to Netflix in another 5-6 years).



Older movies owned by the 5 major studios are, for the moment, still licensed to multiple outlets with no barriers depending on service ownership.



Hope this helps sort things out.

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post #5 of 9 Old 10-25-2019, 07:48 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks Westly. It looks like that took a lot of work to put together. I'm mostly addressing Pay 1 window.
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-26-2019, 12:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westly-C View Post
Studios license their content under two categories...The ''Pay 1 Window'' is the period that new theatrical films are licensed to pay tv services (HBO, Showtime and yes Netflix). This begins 4 to 6 months after a film arrives on home video, and the availability period has usually averages 5-6 years for the service that hold the pay tv rights-but varies and is not continuous for the entire 5-6 yrs (normally after 2 years of a recent films debut on pay tv, the film is removed from that service and is licensed to basic cable networks. After a year or 2 on basic cable that film returns to the pay channel/service in... The ''Pay 2 Window''. Same, recent films, returning to the service that 1st aired/streamed it.



Then there are the ''Library Titles''. Movies that have passed thru Pay 1 & 2 windows and are licensed non exclusively to both pay tv and basic cable, rotating round and round, from one to another...


HBO owned by Time Warner-now ATT, gets Warner Bros new/recent films, plus WB owned New Line Cinema, and has newer titles from 20th Century Fox under a long term exclusive license. Universal's newer movies are also licensed to HBO...



Starz is now owned by Lionsgate, and it has recent Sony/Columbia movies. Lionsgate's new/recent films are currently licensed to...


Epix, formerly owned by Lionsgate, Paramount and MGM, and now solely owned by MGM (PAR sold off its stake last year, as did LG after buying Starz). Epix carries recent films from its former parents, but will lose Lionsgate theatricals to HBO when its current deal expires. (odd that they would bypass their own Starz in favor of HBO, but its a 2 year deal, so short term cash grab before adding them to Starz most likely)


Showtime (owns The Movie Channel, and Flix), is owned by CBS, and has exclusive rights to...CBS Films, IFC Films, STX Ent, Global Road Ent, and Amblin(?) Can't think of any Amblin title off the top of my head. .



Amazon. Amazon licenses a package of films controlled by Epix. Epix sells the same package of movies to Hulu as well. These movies run on Epix first, and then several (used to be 90 days back when Netflix also carried them) months later, provided to the other 2.



Hulu, formerly owned by Fox, Comcast/NBC, Disney with Time Warner buying in a few years ago, is now under full Disney control. Their main movie offerings have been thru the Epix deal mentioned. Plus they carried The Criterion Collection. Not sure if they still do with Criterion wanting to launch their own streamer after the demise of Filmstruck, co owned by Time Warner.


And lastly, Disney+, which will carry their recent theatricals starting with Captain Marvel. Disney films currently on Netflix will remain until their pay tv rights laspe (individually, one at a time- they all won't get Thanos snapped away at the same time. They'll also return to Netflix in another 5-6 years).



Older movies owned by the 5 major studios are, for the moment, still licensed to multiple outlets with no barriers depending on service ownership.



Hope this helps sort things out.
Lionsgate is going to Hulu and FX when Epix deal expires
https://deadline.com/2019/06/hulu-an...20-1202631185/
Hulu And FX Partner For Rights To Lionsgate Theatrical Films, Succeeding Epix In 2020

HBO has a deal with Summit through 2022 (Summit being part of Lionsgate)

No one ever said this would all be easy
Amblin = Dreamworks live action for the most part

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Last edited by tenthplanet; 10-26-2019 at 12:15 AM.
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-26-2019, 10:25 AM
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^ Thank you. HBO-Hulu...Missed it by this much.
Well they both start with an "H".
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-28-2019, 02:51 PM
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The thread could almost be called..Who owns who owns what owns that.... (Sound of commentator screaming running into the night..)

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post #9 of 9 Old 11-04-2019, 09:07 PM
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I think Apple TV.
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