My Mahogany / Invisible Speaker build - Page 17 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #481 of 487 Old 04-04-2018, 09:47 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post
^^This makes me crazy. How did you set the dado stack height? Just sneaking up on it?

Once you get it set for your test piece, you have to readjust three or four times and then come back to your actual work-pieces. Then to avoid resetting the blade eight times, you have to run all the edges through one step at a time - never seeing the final result (aside from the test piece) until you've fully committed both of your work-pieces. (me --> crazy)

And wait a second - the top panel is curved?!
All fair points, Fred. But it wasn't necessary to make the angled dado cuts that exact, plus the panels hadn't yet represented much time nor expense, so if I blew it, it was just back to the lumberyard and start again...

I did need to make some adjustments on the dimensions:


The score marks are part of my dado blade set -- the outsides of the outer blades have a little horn that sticks up which I believe is there to intentionally sever the wood fibers ahead of the cut. I experimented with just running the inner parts of the dado blades -- which are perfectly flat on the tops of the teeth -- and that seemed to work fine.


First step was to create that rounded shoulder on the router table. The straight passes down the sides were trivial, but I needed to figure out a way to make that cut on a curve, make sure it matches the arched frame of the door itself, and to make sure that it was smooth and even. Then it dawned on me that I already had the perfect "fence" for the router table:




Step 1 done on both sides of both panels:




The 90 degree dado was also pretty easy, and was sized so that the resultant tongue fit nicely into the door frames -- about 5/8" thick:



As you can see, I was even able to run the arched edge through that process, although it wasn't super precise and burned the shoulder of the panel a bit. All okay, though -- the thickness of the tongue was what mattered, and that was right on.


Then over to the workbench, earplugs out, and time for some hand tools. I ended up just making 2 passes for the angled dado cuts, leaving a small ridge of wood:




I have a little rabbeting plane that took that off in just a few seconds:




And a few more passes with that brought the beveled surfaces pretty close to where they needed to be:







Next, I made a little sanding sled:




And that took care of the final marks left by the rabbeting plane:




The last step was to deal with that arch, with quite a bit of material to remove:




But a block plane really made pretty quick work of that -- maybe 5 minutes a side:





That didn't get quite all the way, though, so from there it was a bit more work with the rabbeting plane, a hand scraper, and finally the sanding sled, which worked okay, even around the arch.


The door dry assembled:




And a shot of the tenons:




That brings us to present day. This weekend I'll do a bit more sanding of the machined parts of the panels (would be impossible to sand later), and then I'll glue the whole thing up. It's supposed to dump rain here in northern California this weekend so it'll be good shop weather.
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post #482 of 487 Old 05-16-2018, 09:18 AM
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It's been almost two years but I'm back! I couldn't stay away from this home theater...errrrr...woodworking thread! The projects look awesome @cowger ! remember seeing a pic of your workbench some time ago...I'm about to start on a split top Roubo (I've been falling down the woodworking rabbet hole for a while now). Hope you're all doing well!

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post #483 of 487 Old 10-17-2018, 11:30 AM - Thread Starter
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Wow, my last progress on this new front door was back on April. Yet another project pleading for some attention... but I finally got around to finishing this one up.

Next step from where I left off was to glue up the door. To make that easier, I broke the 6 glued joints up into 4 steps.

First was to glue the center rail:



Same thing for the bottom rail (no pic), and similar for the top rail (only the left side of that top rail is glued at this point):


Happily I remembered to first insert the panel -- with the curved top, I couldn't possibly slip that in after the rails were in place...


The final step was to glue the 2nd stile on, which went fine -- just had to hustle through getting glue into 12 mortises, onto the faces of 12 tenons, and along the rest of the joints.


Next was some hand plane work to flatten the door and match the surfaces of all stiles and rails:


Now, since this door was for our cabin, I needed to transport it there on top of our SUV. At around 150 lbs, I couldn't safely lift it onto the roof rack, so I used my "sky hook" in my shop and a block-and-tackle to get it up into the air so I could back underneath it:



Final machining step was to size it for the existing opening and my track saw made that easy. I had built the door a half inch too large on all four edges. Trimming off the excess left a clean edge:



Lots of sanding and finishing... and installed! Side-by-side with the old door:



Since this is a cabin, we wanted this more rustic look and the front door now matches all the interior doors and trim. Felt good to finally check this one off the list.
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post #484 of 487 Old 10-17-2018, 03:30 PM
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Awesome work, as-always! Question...when you cut down the hinge and strike sides of this door, did you bevel the edges? And if so, how much on each side? I've heard 7 degrees on the hinge side and 3 degrees on the strike side for 30"-36" doors. Can you confirm?
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post #485 of 487 Old 10-17-2018, 03:50 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post
Awesome work, as-always! Question...when you cut down the hinge and strike sides of this door, did you bevel the edges? And if so, how much on each side? I've heard 7 degrees on the hinge side and 3 degrees on the strike side for 30"-36" doors. Can you confirm?
Thanks, Tim!

Disclaimer for all of the following: I am no door expert by any means!!!

I did not bevel the hinge side and put about a 1.5 degree bevel on the strike side. Beveling the strike side makes sense to me but I can't think of a logical reason to bevel the hinge side as there isn't any interference here with the jam to consider (is there??).

Here's how I think about the strike side from a CAD perspective:


The yellow represents the door closed; the blue is the door rotated slightly about the hinge pins. The black line represents the amount to take off so that the leading edge of the door doesn't hit the jam as it's closing. That line is 2.5 degrees for this 36" door.

My new door is 42" (hence the custom door necessity), and that came out to 1.75 degrees.

Hope that helps!
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post #486 of 487 Old 12-09-2018, 10:32 AM - Thread Starter
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Did a small but fun project yesterday. For a while, I've been meaning to add a chalkboard to the bar, primarily for listing what beers are on what taps. Since we hosted a neighborhood Christmas party here last night, I wanted folks to know what beer was where, so it was good motivation to finally get this done.

My intention was to match the molding that I did around the movie poster screen, and I decided to mill that all on the router table. I got a piece of Mahogany wide enough to make two pieces from it, which made it very easy to mill the various steps involved in making the profile:



Next was to chamfer the shoulders, so I installed a V bit in the router and used a piece of wood to zero out the depth:



A digital height gauge on the table makes it trivial then to dial up the height of the bit to the shoulder for each chamfer:



Rounding over outside corners then yielded this rough piece... the center ridge will be ripped out when I separate the two pieces, and there are a couple of little ridges left to be cleaned up on the middle steps:


A little block plane took care of those:



After ripping the two pieces apart on the table saw, it was back over to the router table to rabbet out a recess for the chalkboard panel -- just a sheet of 1/8" pre-finished MDF from Home Depot:



I used a guillotine cutter to dial in each miter:



Biscuits and glue then made it a frame:



To mount it, I got some little keyhole hardware pieces and started by locating four holes on the back of the frame. I inserted some little marking pins into each of the four holes:



And then used a spacer up top to keep the frame even with the top of the movie poster frame. Banging the frame with my fist made 4 little indents into the theater wall for installing some flathead screws:



Then each keyhole mount was recessed into the frame:



Installed and put to work. I need to work a bit more on my chalksmanship skills, but it served its purpose last night.


I also need to get to brewing again as we blew through the Grapefruit IPA... : )
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Last edited by cowger; 12-09-2018 at 10:35 AM.
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post #487 of 487 Old 12-11-2018, 01:33 AM
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Exemplary work as always !
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