The Stonewater Cinema Build Thread - Page 23 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 1677Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #661 of 3209 Old 11-13-2013, 07:04 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
doublewing11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Timber Country!
Posts: 5,784
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked: 984
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Hey OJ. Congrats on your little one as well! You're right - our nurseries are very similar. It looks like you did a really nice job on yours. I don't know if you read the back story or not, but my wife saw a design on Pinterest and asked me to replicate. I foolishly gave an unfiltered response that I could make it better. 7 different moldings later and the room was done! biggrin.gif

Oh yeah, I'll show you her latest Pinterest find, depicted in the bath about two weeks ago....


That's right, soap-suds hair and eyebrows. I have to admit, we both had a good laugh as my wife went through a slew of different "hair" styles, including side burns and some facial hair. He was in a mood to tolerate it, so it all worked out.

Regarding the spray foam.....I doubt I would ever want another home without it. It is a night and day difference. The HVAC in the basement will be off for hours and it is just as comfortable in the back walkout portion of the basement as it is toward the front of the house where everything is underground and protected from the weather. The reason the basement is foamed before the electrical went in is I received approval from the local inspectors to insulate so I could take advantage of the energy tax credit a couple years back. It's been a bit of a pain to clear the foam from the sides of some studs to lay new wire and staple, but not too terrible.

Thanks for following along in my thread!

What a cutie.................................they grow up faster than you can imagine! Boy do I miss those days......................seems so, so long ago! When she's ready for college..........................we'll make her a Trojan! biggrin.gif
TMcG likes this.
doublewing11 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #662 of 3209 Old 11-13-2013, 07:56 PM
Advanced Member
 
jbcain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 904
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 81
Not sure how I just stumbled upon this build. Read it start to finish and really enjoy it so far. Great work! I get a good chuckle every time you refer to residential voltage as "high voltage" as I'm a journeyman lineman and work on lines up to 750,000 volts. Anyhow, again, great build in progress. Now I'm subscribed.
jbcain is offline  
post #663 of 3209 Old 11-13-2013, 08:06 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
RTROSE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: South Central Indiana
Posts: 6,705
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 201 Post(s)
Liked: 176
Hey man! Glad to finally see some progress pics. Nicely done and as others have said nice score on the cl seats. As for the spray foam I'll second TMcG. I had my basement spray foamed and am very pleased with the results. Would do it again in a heart beat and if I'm in the situation of ever building a home would pay the premium to have it spray foamed vs. the pink fluffy stuff.

Love the picture of the little one. They do grow up very fast. Before you know it they ask for the car keys, and then off to college. Enjoy the time you have as it is fleeting for sure.

Regards,

RTROSE
TMcG likes this.

My (slower than molasses) HT build here.
Now a Certified Carpet Counselor and Plumbing Counselor (Self given titles - pay no attention).
Enjoying my "almost done" theater.
RTROSE is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #664 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 02:14 AM
Senior Member
 
just jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 452
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked: 68
Great job TMcG! Glad to see the progress. Love the dream seats, but where's the cup holders. You are allowing all the neighbourhood kids to have those syrupy drinks, in the dark, during the show, right? biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by OJ Bartley View Post

Oh, how do you like the spray foam insulation? That's my plan for the basement when we get to it as well.

Hey OJ. If the stud walls in your basement have a space between them and the foundation wall, make sure the spray crew specifically fills it with foam to seal the back of the wood from any moisture coming from the concrete/masonry. If you are using 2 lb, it is closed cell and it will act as a vapour barrier so you won't need plastic. If you use 1/2 lb, the foam is porous and you will need plastic. Remember the power outage we had in the winter of 2009 when frozen pipes burst and took out the power for half of Toronto? The whole house I was working on in High Park was spray foamed. The power was off for two days with -20 C temperatures. The house only dropped about 10 degrees! It IS the only way to go. If you are doing the underside of a roof however, use 1/2 lb to deaden the sound of rain. 2 lb would sound like you have a tin roof! biggrin.gif
TMcG likes this.

Winterfell theatre build - working title
just jim is offline  
post #665 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 03:49 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcain View Post

Not sure how I just stumbled upon this build. Read it start to finish and really enjoy it so far. Great work! I get a good chuckle every time you refer to residential voltage as "high voltage" as I'm a journeyman lineman and work on lines up to 750,000 volts. Anyhow, again, great build in progress. Now I'm subscribed.

Hi JB - I'm glad you were able to stumble your way into my thread and thanks for the compliments and subscribing. This thread admittedly had a couple of lulls with other priorities, but things will start snapping along as I am freeing myself by the day from other projects and obligations like the rest of the basement.

Maybe I should revise my labeling and say "wires that will kill you" and "wires that won't kill you"!! biggrin.gif All kidding aside, I'm amazed that those lines can even be worked on live.
TMcG is offline  
post #666 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 05:21 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
OJ Bartley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 1,215
Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 510 Post(s)
Liked: 607
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Hey OJ. Congrats on your little one as well! You're right - our nurseries are very similar. It looks like you did a really nice job on yours. I don't know if you read the back story or not, but my wife saw a design on Pinterest and asked me to replicate. I foolishly gave an unfiltered response that I could make it better. 7 different moldings later and the room was done! biggrin.gif

Oh yeah, I'll show you her latest Pinterest find, depicted in the bath about two weeks ago....

That is 100% pure awesome. And I also have a combination of Pinterest and Houzz (if your wife hasn't found this one yet, don't tip her off, it is a total time-vacuum!) to thank for the nursery inspiration. I learned a lot while I did it, and it sounds like we had a similar time trying moldings and casings to see what would work. In the end I love it, but there's a lot I would do differently next time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

Hey OJ. If the stud walls in your basement have a space between them and the foundation wall, make sure the spray crew specifically fills it with foam to seal the back of the wood from any moisture coming from the concrete/masonry. If you are using 2 lb, it is closed cell and it will act as a vapour barrier so you won't need plastic. If you use 1/2 lb, the foam is porous and you will need plastic. Remember the power outage we had in the winter of 2009 when frozen pipes burst and took out the power for half of Toronto? The whole house I was working on in High Park was spray foamed. The power was off for two days with -20 C temperatures. The house only dropped about 10 degrees! It IS the only way to go. If you are doing the underside of a roof however, use 1/2 lb to deaden the sound of rain. 2 lb would sound like you have a tin roof! biggrin.gif

Thanks Jim, very reassuring to hear this much support for spray foam. I had a few companies give me rough over the phone quotes last year, and this is the way I plan to go when we start to finish the basement. We aren't framed yet, so the plan is to leave enough space for the foam to do its job (the closed cell, insulation and vapour barrier), but to tie in and cover the back of the framing and still leave enough room behind the drywall to run conduit, wires, etc. Some of my reading says that a key part to make sure you have covered is the band joist, where a lot of air can leak in.
TMcG likes this.
OJ Bartley is online now  
post #667 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 06:54 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Thanks Jim. More to come this weekend, including some equipment pics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

If the stud walls in your basement have a space between them and the foundation wall, make sure the spray crew specifically fills it with foam to seal the back of the wood from any moisture coming from the concrete/masonry. If you are using 2 lb, it is closed cell and it will act as a vapour barrier so you won't need plastic.

Jim makes a great point and is what I did in my basement. I framed 2" away from the foundation wall for this exact reason - so the perimeter seal is continuous and any additional depth is essentially extra insulation at an "R" of 6.9 per inch for the 2 lb. foam.
TMcG is offline  
post #668 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 07:44 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
cw5billwade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: GA
Posts: 1,780
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 329 Post(s)
Liked: 185
During construction my entire 2nd floor from the first floor floor joists up to the beam in the attic was spray foamed. During the summer you can go into atti without breaking a sweat. It was $13k up charge but worth it. My son will be building his house and doing spray foam. It is worth it
cw5billwade is offline  
post #669 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 08:17 AM
Senior Member
 
just jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 452
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by OJ Bartley View Post

... We aren't framed yet, so the plan is to leave enough space for the foam to do its job (the closed cell, insulation and vapour barrier), but to tie in and cover the back of the framing and still leave enough room behind the drywall to run conduit, wires, etc. Some of my reading says that a key part to make sure you have covered is the band joist, where a lot of air can leak in.

If the 2 lb (closed cell) foam can be sprayed to give a contiguous layer between the foundation and wood, (and behind the electrical boxes!) it is considered equivalent to a vapour barrier, the sprayer needs to understand that you require the foam to be applied into this gap BEFORE "filling" the stud space; it is not like 1/2 lb foam and won't spread there on it's own. Then you can save by not doing the vapour barrier and you won't need to wrap the boxes with plastic or use a plastic boot...which are never 100% air tight...a proper 2 lb foam job is. You can clear it with your TO building inspector, but I've never had a problem. The foam company is probably only going to spray 2", which gives you more than the required R12 for a basement. If you leave a 2" gap, like TMcG, you could have most of the full stud depth for running wire and conduit...but do the wiring before hand, the over spray is as TMcG has said, a...what's that word?...difficult, to get off. biggrin.gif Let me know if you want a name.

"Rim" joist? These are the first and last joists that run parallel to the foundation in an old solid brick house; all four sides in a western framed house. Yes, especially in older solid brick homes, there is a gap between the bottom edge and the foundation. The foundation is the equivalent of 3 wythe (here's a new word for anybody who cares! smile.gif It is the layers of brick front to back in a wall), the first floor wall would only be 2 wythe thick to provide 4" for the joist ends to sit on. The open ends are usually filled with brick OR solid blocking, to prevent the joists from twisting. If you have the wood blocking, this gap is on all four sides. This void then is actually 4" behind the rim joist and blocking but usually loosely filled with fallen plaster and wood shavings. If you were renovating the first floor, this space could be cleaned out from above, giving you a shot at filling and sealing it with foam, otherwise, not so much. biggrin.gif If it can't be cleaned out from above, I would get a can(s) of spray foam and from the basement inject as much as you can BEFORE getting the room sprayed. Keep in mind that the 2 lb is very hard, and like in the roof application, can bridge structural members and transmit vibrations (ie sound).

Winterfell theatre build - working title
just jim is offline  
post #670 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 09:11 AM
Senior Member
 
just jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 452
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post

During construction my entire 2nd floor from the first floor floor joists up to the beam in the attic was spray foamed. During the summer you can go into atti without breaking a sweat. It was $13k up charge but worth it. My son will be building his house and doing spray foam. It is worth it

I went from a barely insulated, solid brick, 1907 home (some pink and fuzzy, in a "finished" basement and the 6" rafters above a loft, only!) with a new state of the art, 85% efficient boiler that I had installed, 22 years ago, to a foam insulated (varying types over the years of renos to each floor), plus adding 25% to the gross floor area, plus adding a gas BBQ, which I use a lot, year round (yes, I have winter weight t-shirts for winter,eh) and a big gas range, and I cook a lot. OK, I added thermal storms to most of the lead glass windows and replaced some (somewhere around 120 of them). Gas prices are about where they were 22 years ago. Last year, my gas bill was 2/3 what it was in 1992 with the same boiler. I'm a fan. smile.gif

Being from Georgia, You sit on the line where the foam will save you as much in the summer as in the winter. You are also on that line where it doesn't matter if you have a black roof or a white (light coloured) one. Solar gain vs solar reflection balances out Summer to Winter. I don't know if that puts in spiritual harmony or not?... biggrin.gif

A note: If you do spray the roof, as in a cathedral ceiling, make sure you provide an air damn, soffit to ridge, continuously over the entire underside of the roof boards to ventilate the solar heat permeating through the roofing layers. Even if this means adding a 2 x 2 to the underside of the the rafters to get adequate R-value. If you didn't and you find it "hot" in the summer, the next time you do your roof, consider installing 2 x 2's to the top side and applying another layer of plywood to cool the roof. Radical, I know.

And by the way, you can get away with less than the building code required R-value because the foam (either 1/2 or 2 lb) blows away the performance of fiberglass by actually sealing the building envelope and eliminating air flow within the insulation. The code requirements for insulation may only apply to new construction in your area. Technically, renos in Toronto, don't actually have to be insulated!!!

Most of the R "value" comes in the first inch. It is literally diminishing returns after that!

Winterfell theatre build - working title
just jim is offline  
post #671 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 03:47 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
J_P_A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: L.A. - Lower Alabama
Posts: 5,184
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 766 Post(s)
Liked: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post

During construction my entire 2nd floor from the first floor floor joists up to the beam in the attic was spray foamed. During the summer you can go into atti without breaking a sweat. It was $13k up charge but worth it. My son will be building his house and doing spray foam. It is worth it

Hate to derail TMcG's thread, but I'm curious as to which foam you went with (closed or open)? The jury is still out as to which is better in this part of the country. I spent days researching this before we had our house foamed.

Oh, and to stay at least a little on topic, TMcG, you could always go DIY on the chairs like Jello did smile.gif

Dude, are you made of leprechauns? Cause that was awesome!
The Plains Theater Has Begun
Pro Designed Room - Measurements Before/During/After Treatments.
J_P_A is offline  
post #672 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 08:15 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

Hate to derail TMcG's thread, but I'm curious as to which foam you went with (closed or open)? The jury is still out as to which is better in this part of the country. I spent days researching this before we had our house foamed.

Oh, and to stay at least a little on topic, TMcG, you could always go DIY on the chairs like Jello did smile.gif

Yeah, I'll get right on those chairs right after I put the finishing touches on my cold fusion device! tongue.gif

I'll comment on your foam question from my perspective. Obviously I have 2 lb. closed cell foam in the basement because of its vapor barrier properties and superior insulating R value per inch. However, I had the underside of my roof spray foamed with open-cell spray foam (Icynene) because any potential roof leaks would simply pass through the foam. Using closed cell directly under the roof deck would hold the moisture against the sheet material. Unfortunately the company that sprayed my roof deck did just that...sprayed the underside of the roof. I say unfortunate because they did not install the pre-formed rigid foam baffles so there would be a clear air path from the soffit to the ridge vent. Essentially the company took the approach of converting my attic to conditioned space. It does a great job at rejecting heat and it is warm but not extremely hot in the attic over the summer, but I have concern for the long-term life of my shingles.

The alternative, which I think might even be better than baffles / foam on the underside of the roof deck is to have the back side of the top floor's drywall foamed in with 2-3" of spray foam to form a complete air-tight seal. Then put blown-in insulation on top to bring things up to an R50. This way the entire attic is open and in free air, but there is significant R value for the heat to get into the top floor or for the conditioned air from the second floor get into the attic.
TMcG is offline  
post #673 of 3209 Old 11-14-2013, 08:41 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
J_P_A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: L.A. - Lower Alabama
Posts: 5,184
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 766 Post(s)
Liked: 577
If it's any consolation, I'm not too worried about the shingles. Our attic is foamed the same way as yours, and at least one of the shingle manufacturers has already started warrantying their shingles for full life on homes with spray foam (no venting). I think it's Owens Corning, but I don't remember for sure. For those of us in very humid climates, vapor drive through the walls can be a big issue. The theory I finally settled on is it's better to have a vapor permeable insulation in climates where the vapor drive can change with the seasons. I don't remember the specifics anymore, but the concern was adding closed cell foam in the walls would add a vapor barrier that could potentially trap moisture in the walls.

Dude, are you made of leprechauns? Cause that was awesome!
The Plains Theater Has Begun
Pro Designed Room - Measurements Before/During/After Treatments.
J_P_A is offline  
post #674 of 3209 Old 11-15-2013, 01:10 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
SOFFIT DESIGN - FEEDBACK REQUESTED!

In the background I have been working hard to finalize my finish carpentry design aesthetic, mostly because I need to know precisely what to wire for both 120v and low voltage wires. As previously posted, I have purchased a sophisticated Philips Color Kinetics RGB LED lighting system for this room and it takes wiring that I've personally never had to run or use before and offers features, like Grafik Eye integration, that I didn't know were available until I got the system. So it may seem a bit premature to start looking at this now, but it's actually quite important.

I think I've settled on a design that is functional first and yet incorporates several sleek Art Deco design elements, but I'd like to hear everyone's feedback. I offer you another one of my patented engineering drawings (hey, it worked for the coffered ceiling, didn't it? biggrin.gif)


Now I haven't figured every single detail and molding out yet, but this is more of a working concept that I'd like to lead you through, step-by-step. A special thanks to Cowger and J_P_A to help wargame different approaches to get the look as easily and as inexpensively as possible. First, the underside of the soffit with upward curve. To maximize my veneer material yield, I need the total depth of the assembly, including the curve, to be 24" or less. In case you don't recall, I am using an African Mahogany veneer that has a highly linear grain pattern. I'd like the grain to come out from the wall and wrap up around the curve which means that I do not want the grain of veneer to be parallel with the side wall. Here's another pic of the veneer for those that joined this thread later:


To create the curve, I was considering a number of approaches, including longitudinal kerf cuts at a very specific angle and then gluing, bending and clamping in a form to save the position. While discussing things with JPA, we both simultaneously came to the conclusion that I could buy a pre-fab solid column and cut to size. HERE is an 8" solid column from Menards that should work perfectly for my needs. I calculated that I would need to purchase three columns to have enough pieces for my entire room if my yield is five pieces per column. I'd really like a taller upcurve, but I have a limited soffit height and this at least gets me the gentle curves of the Art Deco style. With the assembly figured out, the question then becomes how to veneer these curved pieces in a vacuum press without the pressure distorting the assembly. I'll probably have to make a form of some sort, in addition to buttressing the inner curvature with some blocking. It shouldn't be too difficult to figure something out.

The end result would be something like this:


The effect of cantilevering the upcurve is that it will create a mini "shelf" for me to house the RGB LED lighting and place a 3-sided Melamine box to get the indirect reflection of the light. I will be using 80 Philips iColor Cove fixtures (pictured below) that connect end-to-end to give 100% uniform coverage. These just don't turn on and produce colors, but are individually addressable pixels that produce infinite variation of light color and intensity. In other words, you can create advanced color chases and other light movements if you so-choose.


The look I am trying to recreate and make my own comes from a soffit design I saw while touring the Paramount Theater in Oakland, CA. Here are a few pics of this soffit design.






Instead of etched glass, I am looking at a glass rod style. If you look at enough Art Deco "Style Moderne" light fixtures, you'll see the use of glass rod in many different configurations. Here are a few original and reproduction fixtures:






At first I contacted a glass rod manufacturer, and while the rods themselves were relatively inexpensive, the blade to cut them approached $300 and the clear-drying optical grade adhesive was expensive. Plus, I was concerned about potential rattles by using glass. I looked for an alternative, preferably in a resin panel. I ended up finding what I was looking for from the same company that produces the alabaster panel, 3-Form. This is their Varia EcoResin Vertu V Mondo which looks exactly like glass rod.


They have a clear panel and a variety of opaque panels. I'm not sure which I will choose but will be ordering samples for my mock-ups with the actual lighting. The panels come in a variety of thicknesses, but I am looking at the 3/4" thickness because there's a lot of polished nicked U-channel like THIS , normally intended for glass shower enclosures which I could use to hold these panels. The channel has inner gasketing that will guarantee absolutely no rattles. I would cut the 4'x8' panels into 4' wide pieces approximately 8" high. The U-channel will give me a touch of polished nickel finish up in the soffit area. I would then partially cover this U-channel with some sort of molding to bridge the gap where indicated. Ideally, I'd like for this assembly to be removable so I could service the lighting behind. Probably a simple Velcro or Neodymium magnet closure mechanism to make things easy. I am leaning toward Velcro on the back side of the U-channel against a piece of blocking.

As you can see, this will be a difficult soffit to build and in order to get the joints perfect, I am entertaining the notion of building the entire assembly on the ground, piece-by-piece and then raising it up 90% of the way with cribbing. On the day of final installation I would have about 20 friends come over to lift the last 10% and hold while I secured the soffit assembly to the soffit framing. I believe the two main fixation points will be near the wall (which can be hidden by crown) and directly into the vertical framing of the soffit, covering the screw heads with a piece of molding. I realize there are a lot of logistics to figure out yet, but this is my rough plan for now.

Thoughts / feedback appreciated!!
TMcG is offline  
post #675 of 3209 Old 11-15-2013, 01:49 PM
Advanced Member
 
psychdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Kinda near Seattle
Posts: 752
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 135 Post(s)
Liked: 264
Yikes, and I thought my soffit took me a long time eek.gif I hope you have a lot of vacation time coming up to tackle this baby. This will be amazing if you pull it off. One thing I will be worried about but I'm positive you will accommodate for based on your entry above ... rattles! If you have some large subs pounding away at that glass just make sure it’s all secured tightly. I would also like to see a different view of the drawing as well (from the front) but I think I get the point from your example pics which are very helpful.

I personally cringe at the thought of building it on the ground and raising it up but maybe that’s because I know my friends would screw it up when asked to lift it up perfectly biggrin.gif … unless it’s built like a tank and no one can damage it.

I very much look forward to seeing you build this thing!! biggrin.gif
psychdoc is offline  
post #676 of 3209 Old 11-15-2013, 05:08 PM
Senior Member
 
just jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 452
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked: 68
I don't want to derail TMcG's thread either but if I could just take a minute to address a concern about shingle deterioration from TMcG. biggrin.gif The shingle manufacturers tried to get out of shingle warranties by claiming the heat build-up from foam accelerated shingle deterioration. A Canadian shingling trade magazine published an independent study on just this, finding no significant effect on the shingles from the foam. TMcG, your thoughts about spraying the top side of the drywall is great, but requires a vapour barrier between the DW and the joists since wood is considered porous. It should be noted that the vapour barrier is actually to stop the moist room air from passing out through the insulation and freezing inside the wall at the dew point, not to stop humid exterior air from coming in. The ventilation of the attic minimizes the solar heat coming through the roof and effecting the room below. This is the traditional location for the insulation. In the special situation of a cathedral ceiling, this is where I was suggesting the air gap or air damn between the roof deck and the insulation to allow fresh air to circulate from the soffit through a continuous ridge vent to minimize the intense heat from building up and working it's way through the foam.

I hate going into attics that have cellulose or fiberglass blown in because of the dust. Just use 1/2 pound to get your R50, with either foam, the plastic vapour barrier is required. First time you have to go into the attic, the loose stuff gets shifted around leaving thin spots.

For the curve, have you thought of "wiggle ply", available in 4' x 8' or 8' x 4' whether you want it to bend long-wise or width-wise. http://packardforestproducts.com/products/plywood/hardwood-plywood/bending-plywood/#sthash.wx1XJVh3.dpbs You can do a 4" radius with it. Reinforce it with ribs and put it in the vacuum press. The veneer will actually help it hold it's shape.

I'm wondering how the textured plastic would fit into the chromed U channel with the gasket. I've stopped rattles with a dab of clear silicone. You could run a bead of silicone on the U which will come in contact with the back side of the plastic. Any oozing silicone would be cleaned up on the back side of the panel and not visible. Small wooden shims/wedges can be temporarily inserted to push the panel tight to the inside or outside of the U frame until the silicone sets.

All of the soffits pictured look like they were built in place and built-up from separate mouldings. I would make sure the room is square! Just kidding. Figure out how your room is not square so that you can compensate for defects and know what the maximum deviation is in a wall. Deduct that from you maximum 24" soffit dimension and that is what you are shooting for for a finished soffit dimension. Using mason lines (don't stretch), set up the line of the soffit. Fit your pre-moulded soffits into the 4 corners to get a tight miter (this is trial and error) and tight cope to the wall (unless this joint is getting hidden with a moulding). Since you are aligning these pieces to the mason line, the butt joints should be a square cut. Cut a pieces to fit the gaps between the corner sections . The grain running perpendicular to the wall will help hide the joints.

You might include cloth tabs on the bottom of the "velcroed" panels so that you can pull them out for bulb service.

I think you've nailed it! I can't think of a more complicated way of doing this. Well done! biggrin.gif
TMcG likes this.

Winterfell theatre build - working title
just jim is offline  
post #677 of 3209 Old 11-15-2013, 06:16 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
HopefulFred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,759
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 572 Post(s)
Liked: 530
I'm trying to visualize assembly and construction, with an eye towards maintenance. First, I have a few questions.

In your first engineering diagram - the area marked "soffit lights + insulation" This implies that you'll cut holes in the veneered bottom of the soffit for recessed lights? Is that right? If that's so, I really think it's worth looking very determinedly for a way to add the veneered panel after the major work is in place and wired.

Clarification - you've linked to an 8" column, so that's a 4" radius - and I suppose you are confident that the veneer will wrap that (I have no experience with veneer). You describe it as solid, but the tech pdf at that website shows that it's hollow, with ID of 4 3/8". Since it's described as load bearing, I would expect a vacuum would not be a problem - but maybe I'm not visualizing the way the vacuum would be set up.

I'm concerned about the light spread within the fixture. Depending on the look you're going for (how much light) and how dimmable the lights are in practice, you may need to experiment with reflective (foil?) coatings on one or more of the interior surfaces to help reflect the light, or maybe a reflective tray, as well as changing the depth of the fixture and the orientation of the LED unit within it. This part definitely needs some trial and error, IMO.

I would want an accessible screw to remove the glass. If the top U-channel is permanently mounted, the bottom can be pinched between blocking on the inside and some very small trim or rail on the outside. Ideally, the ledge that it screws down to is very narrow/shallow, so as to be unobtrusive and make the face of the soffit as smooth and seamless as possible. The lock piece would screw down into the back area of the veneered piece (blocking?). Pardon my automotive reference that may be unfamiliar, but look into the hold-down mechanisms for batteries, especially in most GM vehicles and in most BMWs - it's similar in function to a french cleat, but uses a screw instead of gravity. That way, with one screw every foot or so, you can remove the screws and then slide the bottom U-channel out into the room, releasing the glass for maintenance.

I think you build the "soffit lights + insulation" part in place on the wall/ceiling, then you build the bottom veneered piece and install it. Last, you insert the light fixture and secure the glass. This requires molding to conceal fasteners for the wall edge of the veneered piece, as well as the ceiling edge of the light fixture - then whatever lock you use to hold the U-channel. Clearly, you're gong to want to build as much of it on the ground as possible for testing and so on, but I think you can assemble it this way.
HopefulFred is offline  
post #678 of 3209 Old 11-15-2013, 06:33 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
HopefulFred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,759
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 572 Post(s)
Liked: 530
I thought about it a little more - the battery hold down has a better variation. This completely conceals the faster and does a good job of applying a horizontal squeeze. It's cost you about an inch of width.



Edit: the lip on the edge is in the way - this design would keep the U-channel from coming out. It needs to be lower - though the drawing is not to scale anyway.
TMcG likes this.
HopefulFred is offline  
post #679 of 3209 Old 11-15-2013, 10:12 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
OJ Bartley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 1,215
Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 510 Post(s)
Liked: 607
Wow, this soffit alone is more complex than many theatres I've seen... Well done! My only thought was that if you wanted another option for the glass, I think I recently saw a similar look from a clear corrugated plastic. It was in the star wars themed theatre, I can't remember whose it is, and I'm on my phone right now, but I saw it recently in this forum. Can't be too far down the page.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 4
OJ Bartley is online now  
post #680 of 3209 Old 11-16-2013, 09:18 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Moggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California, Bay Area
Posts: 1,229
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 48
Quote:
I'd like the grain to come out from the wall and wrap up around the curve which means that I do not want the grain of veneer to be parallel with the side wall.

I would think that this is going to be the biggest challenge if I understand correctly. This means that you are going to have to butt joint many pieces of veneer together. This isn't particularly hard if they are glued at the same time (use painters tape on the outside surface to hold them together) but gets much harder if you fit in stages (glue buildup at the edge of the veneer). Also, the veneer will bend much easier parallel with the grain rather than across it.

Having gone through an elaborate soffit build myself I would urge you to think very carefully about the process of installation including how and where pieces are attached. Building sections on the ground is a good idea but I'd make them manageable for a couple of people (and a drywall lift) to install.

No doubt you have already done a lot of thinking so feel free to ignore -- I'm just thinking out loud. This is going to be interesting smile.gif

Cheers!

Edit: One lesson I learned is that *everything* is a potential source of rattle. I thought I was paranoid about over engineering but still had some rattles to address after the build. The idea of a bead of silicon in the U channel is a great one.

My "Old Vic" Theater Build | Screen Build | HT of the Month | Contest Win
My 8 year old daughter: "are contractors the people that mess up your house for money?"
Moggie is offline  
post #681 of 3209 Old 11-18-2013, 11:55 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Gigantic 200 meter (656 feet) roll of Canare 4S11 speaker wire was just delivered today. The picture doesn't do it justice, but the spool itself is approaching 2' high and nearly 100 pounds as it sits.



The scary thing is I might have to order a bit more wire. I have Procella P610s for the front LCR which each require 2 separate wires (6 pulls), two pairs of side speakers, one pair of rear speakers, one pair of main subwoofers, three balancing subwoofers, and two pairs of in-ceiling speakers as a pre-wire for Dolby Atmos (or Auro 3D), one in-ceiling pair per row. For those of you keeping track, that's 21 pulls of speaker wire to the room. 17 of these would be used right away with only the in-ceiling speakers being left unused until the processor technology becomes a bit more mainstream with available content.


On another point, I think I found a door handle set that is a bit more my style and is a 1927 original, not a reproduction. I wanted to hear everyone's thoughts as to preference.

Here is the reproduction (of an original style) that I was looking at purchasing:




And here are two shots of this original 1927 door set in perfect functioning condition, but without a key. It uses more of a modern key by the looks of it, so I would have to have a locksmith make a set of keys and give the mechanical parts a complete once-over, including any necessary lubrication. I don't think I would keep the original patina, but instead break it down into its visible component parts to be nickel plated with a polished finish. I would keep the black enamel painted perimeter on the handle plate.




Just like the exit light, this item would be coming out of a Chicago building that has since been torn down.
TMcG is offline  
post #682 of 3209 Old 11-18-2013, 12:59 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
HopefulFred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,759
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 572 Post(s)
Liked: 530
They both look really nice, but I think I prefer the older one (with patina especially). The only issues that concern me are the reliability and ease of use. If it has a really tight or heavy action, kids and old folks may have trouble.

Will you have no need for adapting the handle set to fit an extra-thick slab?
HopefulFred is offline  
post #683 of 3209 Old 11-18-2013, 01:27 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
BllDo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 2,105
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Liked: 478
I like the look. The rub with those is getting them mortised into the door. I know a couple carpenters that still have a door mortiser for those, but not as many as there used to be.

-

Nothing in this world will tick you off more than seeing a vegetarian eating pudding.
BllDo is offline  
post #684 of 3209 Old 11-18-2013, 02:47 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

They both look really nice, but I think I prefer the older one (with patina especially). The only issues that concern me are the reliability and ease of use. If it has a really tight or heavy action, kids and old folks may have trouble.

Will you have no need for adapting the handle set to fit an extra-thick slab?

All good points. I believe my door is going to end up being 2.75" thick when everything is said and done, so I will have to take the handleset to a metal fab place with a piece of scrap 2.75" thick to have the extension professionally welded onto the door knob. I'd choose a locksmith that could give the entire mechanism a good cleaning and "once over" in addition to making a replacement key. Then everything would be off to the nickel plating company. And finally, I'd have the baked-on enamel finish around the perimeter repainted (or do it myself). If I buy this handle, the reason to have it refinished instead of keeping the original patina is because the rest of the nickel accents will be brand new, polished pieces - including the hinges. I think I'd want all the finishes to match more than keeping the original patina just for the door handle in this case, but I could change my mind, of course.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BllDo View Post

I like the look. The rub with those is getting them mortised into the door. I know a couple carpenters that still have a door mortiser for those, but not as many as there used to be.

Which one do you like? They both have mortise boxes. I've given it a lot of thought and I believe I will hire a finish carpenter to mortise the hinges, mortise the lock set, mortise the Von Duprin electrical transfer device, and help me get the door in place. It is a two-man job anyhow and to be honest.....I don't have the tools. I looked into getting the necessary tools / jigs and have a couple of leads in the water to borrow the necessary equipment for this one small job, but the tools are cost-prohibitive to justify for just this one door. I hate to hire out, but I'd hate it even more if I screwed up my custom-made door.
TMcG is offline  
post #685 of 3209 Old 11-18-2013, 03:59 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Moggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California, Bay Area
Posts: 1,229
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post


Back to the chair for a moment. When I saw this picture it was instantly the best looking chair I've ever seen.

Then you had to add the following:
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

EDIT - Just received a price list from the company that makes the nice chair....including the footrest, the cost is just over 10,800 Euros each or just over $15,000 USD each to a dock in Miami and does not include customs duties or freight from Miami to my home. eek.gif Not that I had high hopes that something like this would ever be in budget, but geesh!!

eek.gif
TMcG likes this.

My "Old Vic" Theater Build | Screen Build | HT of the Month | Contest Win
My 8 year old daughter: "are contractors the people that mess up your house for money?"
Moggie is offline  
post #686 of 3209 Old 11-18-2013, 04:48 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Roger Dressler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Oregon
Posts: 11,548
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2996 Post(s)
Liked: 1758
^^ Meh. No cupholders... rolleyes.gif

Deadwood II Theater (Previous Deadwood Theater HTOM)
Anthem AVM 60 7.4.4; Classé SSP-800 PLIIx 7.4; MiniDSP OpenDRC-AN
Oppo UDP-203; Oppo BDP-93; Win10 media PC w/Roon+Kodi; Roku Ultra; DirecTV Genie
Adam Audio S3V/S3H LCR, KEF Ci200QS 4 srrnd, Tannoy Di6 DC 4 hts, Hsu ULS-15 4 subs
JVC RS520; Stewart Cima Neve screen 125" diag 2.35:1, MLP at 115"
Roger Dressler is offline  
post #687 of 3209 Old 11-18-2013, 05:12 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Daniel Chaves's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: LA (Valley Village)
Posts: 1,809
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 624 Post(s)
Liked: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

^^ Meh. No cupholders... rolleyes.gif

lol I totally agree its just not a movie theater without a cup holder ^_^

Projector: BenQ w1500 + ES Sable 135" 16:9 Screen AVR: Marantz SR6011 ATMOS/DTSX + Unity 2ch Amp + Darbee 5000s Speakers: Polk Audio TSX550t (FL/FR), CS2 Series II (C), FXiA6 (SL/SR), Monitor40 Series II (RL/RR), TSx110B (Ceiling FL/FR RL/RR) LFE: (2) JL Audio 12" Subs + (2) Dayton 15" Subs + (2) ButtKicker LFE Arrangement: 7.1.4 Source: OPPO UDP-203 4k Bluray Player, HTPC, nVidia Shield TV Pro, Hauppauge OTA DVR
Daniel Chaves is offline  
post #688 of 3209 Old 11-19-2013, 05:08 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Thanks for all the advice and input, guys!
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

One thing I will be worried about but I'm positive you will accommodate for based on your entry above ... rattles! If you have some large subs pounding away at that glass just make sure it’s all secured tightly. I would also like to see a different view of the drawing as well (from the front) but I think I get the point from your example pics which are very helpful. I personally cringe at the thought of building it on the ground and raising it up but maybe that’s because I know my friends would screw it up when asked to lift it up perfectly biggrin.gif … unless it’s built like a tank and no one can damage it.

I was hoping my hand engineering drawing would be sufficient to get the gist of the design. I'm going to do a full-size mock-up when the time comes with a 2-4 section of scrap and some of the sample panels. Fortunately the panels are resin (not glass) and the metal u-channel already has a u-shaped gasket to hold things tight without rattles....I hope!! biggrin.gif During my discussion with Cowger and JPA it became more and more clear to me that to get PERFECT joints on these large pieces, I really needed to make assemblies. And it just seemed easier to join everything at once while the backs / blocking were accessible vs. installing in pieces or assemblies when it becomes virtually impossible to clamp without damage to the veneer at that point. I'll have to think about it some more, but I think if I call my "A" friends (where "A" means that they pay attention to the details!), I should be OK if I go this route. rolleyes.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

A Canadian shingling trade magazine published an independent study on just this, finding no significant effect on the shingles from the foam. TMcG, your thoughts about spraying the top side of the drywall is great, but requires a vapour barrier between the DW and the joists since wood is considered porous.

Great to know! I've always had a bit of concern since my Icynene was installed. You wouldn't need a vapor barrier with the 2lb. foam because the foam also encapsulates the ceiling joists and not just the back side of the drywall. Filling with blown-in allows you to get to an R50 without breaking the bank since 2lb. foam can only be sprayed in 2 inch lifts. Not only would going all spray-foam be expensive from a materials standpoint, but also labor. I hate the stuff as well, but it's thousands cheaper than going 100% foam.
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

For the curve, have you thought of "wiggle ply", available in 4' x 8' or 8' x 4' whether you want it to bend long-wise or width-wise. http://packardforestproducts.com/products/plywood/hardwood-plywood/bending-plywood/#sthash.wx1XJVh3.dpbs You can do a 4" radius with it. Reinforce it with ribs and put it in the vacuum press. The veneer will actually help it hold it's shape.

Great suggestion and one of my original thoughts. The equivalent product here that is stocked is called Timberflex. The question then became if I make the whole soffit from this or just the curved part? How would the flat part stay flat? - Would it need a backing? And then for the curved part, would I have to form it with glue in a mold first and then go back and veneer? Is the attachment between the curved and flat as strong as it would be with the solid? After exploring the answers to all these questions, we ended up eliminating this product as it increases complication and, regrettably, is $175 per 4'x8' sheet here in Charlotte, NC. WAY expensive!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

I'm wondering how the textured plastic would fit into the chromed U channel with the gasket. I've stopped rattles with a dab of clear silicone. You could run a bead of silicone on the U which will come in contact with the back side of the plastic. Any oozing silicone would be cleaned up on the back side of the panel and not visible. Small wooden shims/wedges can be temporarily inserted to push the panel tight to the inside or outside of the U frame until the silicone sets.

If you click on the link you'll see there is a full rubber U-shaped gasket that runs inside the u-shaped channel. I'm hoping that gasket would prevent the rattles without needing silicone. I know hope is not a generally accepted engineering term, but...you know....biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

All of the soffits pictured look like they were built in place and built-up from separate mouldings. I would make sure the room is square!

As of right now I have extra-long 4" screws going through the top plate of my decoupled theater walls into any type of structure the screw would reach. A buddy of mine and I spent a little over an hour squaring the four walls to either dead-on or within a 1/16". I figured it was time well-invested. Once I secure the wall decoupling brackets I will remove the long screws. Hopefully this little bit of extra effort saves me hours of aggravation down the road. Thanks for the feedback!
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

In your first engineering diagram - the area marked "soffit lights + insulation" This implies that you'll cut holes in the veneered bottom of the soffit for recessed lights? Is that right? If that's so, I really think it's worth looking very determinedly for a way to add the veneered panel after the major work is in place and wired.

My apologies that my diagram was not clear. I will build all the rough carpentry for the soffits first and then run all the necessary high voltage / low voltage wiring and stuff with insulation. Although I will have holes pre-drilled through the veneered carpentry for the lighting, I'll simply reach my arm up through the holes once the soffit is installed to pull down the electrical tails. At least that's how I'm planning it to go in my head if I lift the veneered structure into position all at once. rolleyes.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Clarification - you've linked to an 8" column, so that's a 4" radius - and I suppose you are confident that the veneer will wrap that (I have no experience with veneer). You describe it as solid, but the tech pdf at that website shows that it's hollow, with ID of 4 3/8". Since it's described as load bearing, I would expect a vacuum would not be a problem - but maybe I'm not visualizing the way the vacuum would be set up.

Again, sorry for the confusion. By solid I meant that the curved part would be solid lumber. I reached out to a couple millwork shops to see if they had "extra large" quarter round (3" tall) as a potential option. Some did, but with setup fees and the price per lf with poplar, the cost was about $11 per lf. The columns, on the other hand, would give me 5 or 6 pieces at about 7' each once I chopped off the ends with the decorative accent. That's 35 to 42 linear feet of curved material for $98. Since the thickness is different than the 3/4" ply, I'd have to notch out any of my buttressing between the two pieces
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

I'm concerned about the light spread within the fixture. Depending on the look you're going for (how much light) and how dimmable the lights are in practice, you may need to experiment with reflective (foil?) coatings on one or more of the interior surfaces to help reflect the light, or maybe a reflective tray, as well as changing the depth of the fixture and the orientation of the LED unit within it. This part definitely needs some trial and error, IMO.

Great point and I will definitely do a full-size mock-up before committing to the final design and making sawdust. The initial drawing was loosely based on Philips Color Kinetic's recommendations for that iCove fixture.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post


I like this as a potential fixation option - thanks! Your diagram really made it easy to visualize what you were saying in your previous post.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OJ Bartley View Post

My only thought was that if you wanted another option for the glass, I think I recently saw a similar look from a clear corrugated plastic. It was in the star wars themed theatre, I can't remember whose it is, and I'm on my phone right now, but I saw it recently in this forum. Can't be too far down the page.
I'm definitely subscribed to that Star Wars thread and know what you are talking about. The 3-Form panel is actually not glass, but a clear acrylic resin that can be cut and worked like wood (with reduced tool speeds). I appreciate the suggestion, but after having looked at the two side-by-side I think I prefer the look of glass rods that comes from the 3-Form panel - although I wish it were as cheap as the corrugated plastic!!
TMcG is offline  
post #689 of 3209 Old 11-19-2013, 06:24 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moggie View Post

I would think that this is going to be the biggest challenge if I understand correctly. This means that you are going to have to butt joint many pieces of veneer together. This isn't particularly hard if they are glued at the same time (use painters tape on the outside surface to hold them together) but gets much harder if you fit in stages (glue buildup at the edge of the veneer). Also, the veneer will bend much easier parallel with the grain rather than across it.

Having gone through an elaborate soffit build myself I would urge you to think very carefully about the process of installation including how and where pieces are attached. Building sections on the ground is a good idea but I'd make them manageable for a couple of people (and a drywall lift) to install.

No doubt you have already done a lot of thinking so feel free to ignore -- I'm just thinking out loud. This is going to be interesting smile.gif

Cheers!

Edit: One lesson I learned is that *everything* is a potential source of rattle. I thought I was paranoid about over engineering but still had some rattles to address after the build. The idea of a bead of silicon in the U channel is a great one.

Thanks Moggie, I really appreciate your feedback and you raise excellent points.

To get the look of the veneer right between all of the different 4' or 8' long sections, I'll have to tape together all the veneer necessary to go from corner to corner for any given segment of the soffit. This would avoid an obvious difference in the veneer grain pattern at the butt joints (i.e. consistent veneer widths all the way around). The veneer would be applied to the assemblies in the vacuum press and trimmed to make sure the edges are flush.

I am very concerned about having the wood glue oozing out on the edges as you pointed out. Is there any way to avoid this - like using less glue, putting glue only on the edge furthest away from the veneer, applying painter's tape to the facing of the veneer along the butt joints? I'm not sure what can be done to join the sections without getting the glue all over the visible parts.

Cowger gave the suggestion of building assemblies and the more I thought about it, the more I convinced myself (probably only myself rolleyes.gif) to assemble the entire soffit as a single assembly. There were three reasons why this might make sense: 1. I would have full access to the backside of the soffit for blocking to screw, clamp, Kreg jig, etc. any two pieces together along the full joint. I couldn't do this if it was up in the air and trying to line up the butt joints, especially on the curved portions. 2. I didn't trust my own ability to get each piece installed square enough that all of the joints around of the perimeter would line up perfectly. 3. It would be very difficult if not impossible to get the doweling into position for the last pieces of each completed "square" since everything else would be locked down.

Like you, I'm just thinking aloud as nothing is set in stone at this point and everything is changeable.
TMcG is offline  
post #690 of 3209 Old 11-19-2013, 06:27 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,725
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1657 Post(s)
Liked: 1914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

^^ Meh. No cupholders... rolleyes.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Chaves View Post

lol I totally agree its just not a movie theater without a cup holder ^_^

I guess if I could afford their $15,000 chair I could also afford their $8,000 side table to set my drink, popcorn and remote on....



biggrin.gif

Man that stuff is expensive....
Elill likes this.
TMcG is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off