My house is not appraising for enough - Page 2 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #31 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 09:28 AM
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Put a closet in the room. That's pretty much all it takes to make a room a bedroom.

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post #32 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 09:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fryet View Post
I won't have a problem finding the $7900, but I am more worried about resale. It is a shame that that media rooms aren't valued by appraisers. It drives the industry in the direction of building 5+ bedrooms, while most American families don't need them. Adding a media room, to me, is a better justification of a larger home, but it is impossible finding a media room in a new home that is under 3000 square feet. Appraisals is probably the reason why.

How far in are you, can you still run plumbing to a point where you could put a bath in down the road if needed. As has been stated kitchens and baths will sell a house, having the plumbing stubbed out now will be much cheaper than doing it later.
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post #33 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post
Put a closet in the room. That's pretty much all it takes to make a room a bedroom.
Correct. As Im reading through this thread Im like why is this a big deal? Im a full time Real Estate Investor and all takes is four walls and a closet to make a room a bedroom.

So if your really concerned about resale, my advice is to enjoy your space now. Then when you move put a false(non load bearing) wall between the two rooms, frame in a closet in each room and you have 4 bedrooms. Now seeing how in the grand scheme of things Real Estate goes up in value. Your home will be worth more when you sale than it is now (assuming that since your doing these custom upgrades to your home you plan on staying out for at least another 5 years). Heck the things the market is doing now, your home will probably make up the lose on its own with appreciation. As a real estate investor I truly would no worry about $7900 hit on a house that I plan on keeping for a while, especially since your adding a Home Theatre and not lowering the sq ft. so all except the bathroom is easily reversible for probably that same $7900 as its nothing but wood and sheetrock to add the bedrooms back.
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post #34 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by robrains View Post
Correct. As Im reading through this thread Im like why is this a big deal? Im a full time Real Estate Investor and all takes is four walls and a closet to make a room a bedroom.

So if your really concerned about resale, my advice is to enjoy your space now. Then when you move put a false(non load bearing) wall between the two rooms, frame in a closet in each room and you have 4 bedrooms. Now seeing how in the grand scheme of things Real Estate goes up in value. Your home will be worth more when you sale than it is now (assuming that since your doing these custom upgrades to your home you plan on staying out for at least another 5 years). Heck the things the market is doing now, your home will probably make up the lose on its own with appreciation. As a real estate investor I truly would no worry about $7900 hit on a house that I plan on keeping for a while, especially since your adding a Home Theatre and not lowering the sq ft. so all except the bathroom is easily reversible for probably that same $7900 as its nothing but wood and sheetrock to add the bedrooms back.
Not really true. A closet is not required for a bedroom to meet code, but buyers will expect it.

The larger issue is an egress is required, usually a window, which is not great to have in a dedicated media room.
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post #35 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 12:31 PM
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Found this:


The 4 requirements for a room to be considered a bedroom

September 9, 2014 By Ryan Lundquist 77 Comments
Is it a bedroom or not? Let’s talk about what makes a bedroom a bedroom. I had someone ask me this question a few weeks ago after I wrote about whether a bedroom needs a window or not. I hope this is helpful. Feel free to pitch in any further insight or ask questions below.

Four things a room MUST have to be considered a bedroom:
  1. Entrance: A bedroom needs at least two methods of egress, so it should be accessible from the house (commonly through a door), and then have one other exit (window or door).
  2. Ceiling Height: A bedroom ceiling needs to be at least 7 ft tall. It’s okay if some portions of the ceiling are below this level, but at least 50% of the ceiling needs to be a minimum of 7 ft in height. Most ceilings tend to be at least 8 ft tall, so ceiling height is not usually an issue (R305.1).
  3. Escape: A bedroom must have one other method of egress beyond the entrance point. A door to the exterior works as an exit point, and so does a window. According to the International Residential Code, a bedroom window can be between 24 and 44 inches from the floor, it needs at least 5.7 square feet for the opening, and it must measure no less than 24 inches high and 20 inches wide (R310.1).
  4. Size: The room should be at least 70 sq ft, and more specifically the room cannot be smaller than 7 feet in any horizontal direction (sorry, that 1’x70′ room won’t work) (R304.2 / R304.4).
As you can see, size, access, light, and ventilation all matter when it comes to defining a bedroom (IRC). There is one more issue we should talk about though. The closet.
Are closets required? A bedroom should probably have a closet since most buyers expect one, but technically the International Residential Code does NOT mandate a bedroom to have a closet. So the lack of a closet does not necessarily mean a room cannot be a bedroom. However, we must ask, what does the local real estate market expect, and what is required by the local city/county? Would buyers consider a room as a bedroom if there is no closet? In newer tract subdivisions it’s probably a bigger deal to have no closet, but in older classic homes where bedrooms were sometimes not built with closets, it’s very likely not an issue at all. For instance, consider a Victorian home without closets in any bedrooms. While some in the real estate community say closets are always required, that rule doesn’t really apply here for two reasons: 1) The IRC definition of a bedroom does not actually mandate a closet; and 2) If the market considers the rooms as bedrooms, that’s what they are. It would be highly improbable for buyers to walk through an old Victorian home without closets and say, “The house was stunning and utterly perfect… but there weren’t any bedrooms”. Does that make sense? Ultimately closets are not technically mandated by the international definition, but they may be expected and/or required by local code.
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post #36 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 01:10 PM
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Maybe things are different in your local municipality. Keep in mind that the IRC is a guide line and local municipality can govern and adapt however they see fit. I say that because I rehab homes in Florida(Miami, Ft. Lauderdale) and South Carolina(Charleston). And the city building department and zoning department in these municipalities(two different states BTW) will not allow you to convert any space into a bedroom without a closet. I have converted rooms and done additions and a means of egress is correct, I wasnt aware he had gotten rid of the windows, but where ever I go you cant call a room "bedrooom" without a closet. They will just add it on to the square footage and its looked at like a living room of sorts.

To the OP if this does bother you I would ask the Contractor what it would take convert that space into two rooms and he should know the local building code well enough to answer that for you. When I made my original post I wasnt aware you had removed the windows.
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post #37 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 01:13 PM
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This is a good thread BTW. For those looking to have dedicated media space which I hope to one day. This can be a huge pitfall for some people. As an investor equity is everything and I wouldnt do anything to lose it, so some real good info here.
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post #38 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Found this:


The 4 requirements for a room to be considered a bedroom

September 9, 2014 By Ryan Lundquist 77 Comments
Is it a bedroom or not? Let’s talk about what makes a bedroom a bedroom. I had someone ask me this question a few weeks ago after I wrote about whether a bedroom needs a window or not. I hope this is helpful. Feel free to pitch in any further insight or ask questions below.

Four things a room MUST have to be considered a bedroom:
  1. Entrance: A bedroom needs at least two methods of egress, so it should be accessible from the house (commonly through a door), and then have one other exit (window or door).
  2. Ceiling Height: A bedroom ceiling needs to be at least 7 ft tall. It’s okay if some portions of the ceiling are below this level, but at least 50% of the ceiling needs to be a minimum of 7 ft in height. Most ceilings tend to be at least 8 ft tall, so ceiling height is not usually an issue (R305.1).
  3. Escape: A bedroom must have one other method of egress beyond the entrance point. A door to the exterior works as an exit point, and so does a window. According to the International Residential Code, a bedroom window can be between 24 and 44 inches from the floor, it needs at least 5.7 square feet for the opening, and it must measure no less than 24 inches high and 20 inches wide (R310.1).
  4. Size: The room should be at least 70 sq ft, and more specifically the room cannot be smaller than 7 feet in any horizontal direction (sorry, that 1’x70′ room won’t work) (R304.2 / R304.4).
As you can see, size, access, light, and ventilation all matter when it comes to defining a bedroom (IRC). There is one more issue we should talk about though. The closet.
Are closets required? A bedroom should probably have a closet since most buyers expect one, but technically the International Residential Code does NOT mandate a bedroom to have a closet. So the lack of a closet does not necessarily mean a room cannot be a bedroom. However, we must ask, what does the local real estate market expect, and what is required by the local city/county? Would buyers consider a room as a bedroom if there is no closet? In newer tract subdivisions it’s probably a bigger deal to have no closet, but in older classic homes where bedrooms were sometimes not built with closets, it’s very likely not an issue at all. For instance, consider a Victorian home without closets in any bedrooms. While some in the real estate community say closets are always required, that rule doesn’t really apply here for two reasons: 1) The IRC definition of a bedroom does not actually mandate a closet; and 2) If the market considers the rooms as bedrooms, that’s what they are. It would be highly improbable for buyers to walk through an old Victorian home without closets and say, “The house was stunning and utterly perfect… but there weren’t any bedrooms”. Does that make sense? Ultimately closets are not technically mandated by the international definition, but they may be expected and/or required by local code.
Sorry for three posts but Im new here and didnt get the quote thing right. But, great info and accurate.
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post #39 of 45 Old 11-03-2015, 03:55 PM - Thread Starter
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The media room does have windows on one side. It has a view so I hated to get rid of those windows. The TV will be far away, plus I plan for blackout blinds - I should be able to get complete darkness. So anyway, if I had to convert the room into a bed room later, it would be one massive room unless I wanted to install an additional door and window. Incidentally, they incorrectly added additional windows to the room, that they later had to fill in. I don't know if that would make it easier or harder to make into a window later. My hope, though, is that I would find a buyer that would value a media room. I just wish that appraisers would not value bedrooms > media rooms.

To be honest, the missing bathroom would be the bigger issue, as the house only has 2 bedrooms, and if you added another bedroom, there is not a bathroom anywhere nearby.
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post #40 of 45 Old 11-04-2015, 05:31 AM
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In my last house I used the largest of 3 bedrooms as a dedicated theater. It had nothing permanently changed, just dark ceiling and walls, theater seats, screen and PJ, 7.1 surround system.
The buyers insisted on leaving the room as is, as well as all the equipment. It was a young couple, and they considered it great selling point compared to other homes they looked at.
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post #41 of 45 Old 11-04-2015, 09:53 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckgolf View Post
In my last house I used the largest of 3 bedrooms as a dedicated theater. It had nothing permanently changed, just dark ceiling and walls, theater seats, screen and PJ, 7.1 surround system.
The buyers insisted on leaving the room as is, as well as all the equipment. It was a young couple, and they considered it great selling point compared to other homes they looked at.
So how do you find a home theater enthusiast that would value the setup? I guess I would have to find some kind of local newspaper for home theater equipment. Does such a thing exist? Maybe advertise in Craig's List?
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post #42 of 45 Old 11-04-2015, 10:53 AM
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$7,900 doesn't seem like much of a drop to me for loosing 2 BR & 1 Bath. It seems like the appraiser did give the media room some value, but I don't know your market.

Anyway, I'd definitely get the bath subbed in and hidden (if possible) because I think adding it and at least one BD when it's time to sell will add value.

Thanks,
Dan
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post #43 of 45 Old 11-04-2015, 11:30 AM
 
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Interesting thread. I kinda always thought my theater added value, but maybe not. In my case I sacrificed a garage during construction, later added a large 3 car detached garage next to the house. So I didn't lose any bedrooms or bathrooms, but if I ever sell the house they are getting a room with no windows.
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post #44 of 45 Old 11-04-2015, 11:53 AM
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Great thread. And a reminder it's not the appraiser that is doing this to you, it's a reflection of the marketplace. And, frankly, around here losing those rooms about be more like a 250k loss than a 7k loss. So maybe that makes it easier to handle

Last edited by nathan_h; 11-04-2015 at 12:15 PM. Reason: sorry just looked up numbers in the local market
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post #45 of 45 Old 11-04-2015, 11:58 AM
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I think a media room will increase the value for the right buyer, even if it costs you out of pocket now. It might take longer to sell in finding that right person, but I've read that there are increasingly more media rooms being installed these days, and so maybe the market will come around to understanding that value in the near future.


Personally I was looking for a house with a nice media room already in place (built to accomdate/install a screen, risers etc), but couldn't find anything worth two toots in my house buying price range. It might be because I was looking used, and they just didn't have those types of rooms much in the past. For whatever, reason, there didn't seem to be many out there in the mid tier house range in the mid-west until you got into the $300,000ish range and that was well above my intended house buying bracket.

So instead, I bought a big used house and installed one, and used the basement area to do so. I'm quite pleased with the house and that single room upgrade has been my favorite upgrade to the house. I think it would have to add value when/if I choose to resell.

I rent my previous house now, and I can tell you many of the people that want to come look at the house say they were interested because they saw the theater room in the ad ----- so there is appeal out there.

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