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post #1 of 67 Old 12-28-2015, 09:30 PM - Thread Starter
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The Cincitucky Theater

Complete! (for now)





Original Post ...


Hello everyone!

I started this discussion over in the General Home Theater & Media/Game Rooms forum as my original intention was turn the living room/Kitchen area in my basement into a larger family room with a screen and projector. With the help and suggestions of some others on the forums (mostly Tedd) I've decided to take the unused bedroom in my basement and make it a dedicated theater room. The previous discussion can be found Here

My room is rather small compared to others I've seen around the forums at only 16'10.5" x 11'11" but i'm single with no kids at home so it will mostly just be me watching movies. I plan to use the room for watching movies either from Blue Ray Disc or from my HTPC . I don't intend to use it for gaming but there could be a time or two when i may hook up a PC or gaming console. TV shows I will probably watch TV shows on my TV in the living room.

Attached are some room layouts and pictures of the original room as well as some sketchup renderings of what I have in mind. (some of the measurements on the floor plans are close but not entirely accurate.) The measurements on the 3D renderings are accurate. Since I don't have a projector just yet the placement of the projector on the 3D renerings is only to show what i have to work with and not the location of where I plan to mount it.

I started the demolition of the wall and closet last week, this week I plan to remove the ceiling fan in the kitchen area as it is in the way of the new wall and relocate the fixture to line up with the door to the patio. I plan to replace that ceiling fan with a regular light fixture.

Right now as I am ripping the old wall out these are my issues:

1 - As you can see in the top view of the 3D rendering the HVAC soffit runs right through the center of the room. Not much I can do about that but the soffit is bigger than it needs to be. The soffit was originally designed to meet up with the wall for the closet. I've already torn apart part of the soffit that was against the wall and I can see that there is nothing in the that extra foot or so of soffit that extends to the front of the room. I could just replace the drywall and leave it as is, or remove that piece while I have it all torn apart but I don't know that I really gain anything other than the way it looks once finished.

2 - Lighting - This room currently has one light that is in front of where the closet was. You can almost see it in the picture of the closet but the soffit blocks most of it. The light has to move as it's in the way of the screen. The question is, while I have the drywall ripped out, should I use the circuit for that light to power a few recessed lights? I'm thinking I could add two lights in front of the screen and 2 above the seating area but that means having them split with the soffit between them. Just not sure how that would look.

3 - I don't plan to go as far as sound proofing the room, however I will want to do what I can to keep the sound from leaking through the window I plan to cover behind the screen. Also since I am building the new wall from scratch would it be beneficial to put some sound absorbing material in that wall?


Any tip or suggestions are greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 67 Old 12-28-2015, 10:12 PM
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Thank you.
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post #3 of 67 Old 12-29-2015, 08:37 AM
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Greetings and welcome to the madness. As for the size of your space, no worries you can just call your theater "cozy" and the problem is solved. As long as you have realistic expectations within your room limitations you are good to go.

Just some suggestions regarding a couple of things. On the lighting, yes I would consider adding some additional "can lighting" to the room as you suggested and put them on dimmers. Just be sure you don't overload the circuit while doing so. Just put them on dimmers and no worries. I have four switches/dimmers controlling my lights, one for the sconces, front, middle, and back row of lighting. When they are on the minimum setting is is just like being in a commercial theater, and I usually watch with the all but the back row off.

As for the sound mitigation. I'm sorry to be a spoiler it is for the most part an all or nothing game. I'll let others chime in on this as I'm no expert and since you have only raised concern about a specific window there may be options regarding that one sound source. I know that sound is a pesky thing, it gets around and through things just like water does.

Looking forward to seeing this come together.

Regards,

RTROSE

My (slower than molasses) HT build here.
Now a Certified Carpet Counselor and Plumbing Counselor (Self given titles - pay no attention).
Enjoying my "almost done" theater.
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post #4 of 67 Old 01-03-2016, 03:21 PM - Thread Starter
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I managed to get some work done over my Christmas vacation. The demolition of the old wall is done, the hideous rose colored carpet is gone the ceiling fan has been removed and replaced with a light fixture and relocated in front of the door to the patio. Now I'm ready to start building i think. However I am an amateur carpenter at best so I do have a couple of questions for those of you with real carpentry skills.

In the picture below you can see I have indicated with the red rectangle where my new wall will intersect with the existing exterior wall. There is a stud located where my wall will meet that wall. Should I take out the section of drywall where the new wall meets the existing wall or can I build the new wall against the existing wall leaving the existing drywall in place?

Question 2: Is there any harm in leaving the linoleum that extends in from the kitchen and building the wall and laying the new carpet over it or would it be best to remove it?



Some other pictures of my progress:






I also need to decide what to do about the soffit. Leave it as is and fix the part that came out with the wall or cut out the rest of the unused area and frame and drywall it making it smaller.
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post #5 of 67 Old 01-03-2016, 04:24 PM
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I'd reframe the soffit, and minimise it's size. It could be reframed so the drywall just skims the HVAC sheet metal, so as to gain a couple of inches of room height.


Now that the soffit is opened up, is there any reason for that jog?


There's no reason you need to open up the drywall up front. You could simply attach a 2x4" stud to the stud by the electrical box. I'd be careful about screw length (or nail length) selection around the stud close to the electrical box height though, as there's good potential of a 120V line either running up either side of the stud, or a vertical run of wire.
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post #6 of 67 Old 01-03-2016, 06:08 PM - Thread Starter
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No there is nothing in the soffit other than the HVAC duct and the gas line that can be seen in that picture, the rest is empty space. I think they built it that way just because it was easier to drywall the bottom of the soffit all the way over to the wall of the closet, otherwise it would have created a small nook in the ceiling from the end of the soffit to the wall of the closet.
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post #7 of 67 Old 01-03-2016, 07:01 PM
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I'd straighten it out then, and minimise the soffit.

It could hide track lighting as screen wash lights, if you wanted to add some variety in lighting.


I do like lighting as a way to add some design flair, to a smaller space. It's really easy to overload a small room, so lighting is practically a zero foot print way to add some drama.
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post #8 of 67 Old 01-03-2016, 09:21 PM
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On the flooring question. Are the two floors at the same level? If so I'd leave it, if not remove the linoleum so you don't have an uneven floor even though it would be slight.

Regards,

RTROSE

My (slower than molasses) HT build here.
Now a Certified Carpet Counselor and Plumbing Counselor (Self given titles - pay no attention).
Enjoying my "almost done" theater.
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post #9 of 67 Old 01-04-2016, 08:52 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTROSE View Post
On the flooring question. Are the two floors at the same level? If so I'd leave it, if not remove the linoleum so you don't have an uneven floor even though it would be slight.

Regards,

RTROSE
The floor is concrete with linoleum on it so the difference in height is only the thickness of the linoleum.
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post #10 of 67 Old 01-05-2016, 08:10 AM
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Another welcome to the forum. I came seeking advice, but stick around for occasional doses of my own desire for therapy and counseling

Yes, your room is small compared to many builds, but you have more than enough room to construct a dedicated theater space that performs well and looks great. That said, I'm biased. My room is similar in size to yours. The room was 16'8" x 12'2" with 8'9" ceilings.

This is what the room looked like after spring rains led to a basement flood. This is a view towards the future screen wall:




After quite a bit of planning, professional design advice, expert advice from BIGmouthInDC, great input from several forum members, and a lot of sweat equity, the room looks like this:




You've done quite a bit of thinking on layout, but before you start swinging the hammer, a couple items to reduce significant rework and/or "I wish I had done that differently"
1) Figure out your lighting plan (e.g., screen wash, primary room lighting, accent lighting)
2) Determine if you need any HVAC modifications, both supply and return, to keep the room comfortable

On #1 , after you dramatically shrink the size of the soffit around that duct, you could incorporate it into your ceiling design. Perhaps create a double tray ceiling, one tray between the screen and the HVAC with another between the HVAC and the projector. Then, you could put recessed lighting in the side and rear soffits. Put screen wash lighting in the front soffit. And consider accent lighting in the 2 trays using LED strips.

Side note: example of minimal framing around an i-beam to reduce ceiling height loss. You might be able to do something similar with your HVAC duct:



On #2 , the HVAC duct should have more than enough supply air, but you may want to increase the register size to minimize the air noise. Is there a return in the room? If you're not "soundproofing", you could use the space under the door as a return. If you decide to go the sound containment route, there are a few other considerations for both the supply and the return.


With those two plans decided, you may decide to do a bit more demo so you can pull wires and modify HVAC before you switch to building.

Good luck, I'll be following

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post #11 of 67 Old 01-05-2016, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newt1822 View Post
In the picture below you can see I have indicated with the red rectangle where my new wall will intersect with the existing exterior wall. There is a stud located where my wall will meet that wall. Should I take out the section of drywall where the new wall meets the existing wall or can I build the new wall against the existing wall leaving the existing drywall in place?

Question 2: Is there any harm in leaving the linoleum that extends in from the kitchen and building the wall and laying the new carpet over it or would it be best to remove it?



I also need to decide what to do about the soffit. Leave it as is and fix the part that came out with the wall or cut out the rest of the unused area and frame and drywall it making it smaller.
Before you extend that wall, determine whether you'll need to move the outlet which is just to the right of the red rectangle. May need to shift over a couple inches. Also, you may need to add an outlet inside the theater room on the front wall to be code compliant. Since the two front outlets will be behind the screen wall, you could put in a surface box.

My in progress build thread: The Salt Mine
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post #12 of 67 Old 01-05-2016, 09:38 AM
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Put the electrical box in the new side wall, and simply add it to the existing box there.
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post #13 of 67 Old 01-05-2016, 10:26 AM - Thread Starter
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The old wall had 2 electrical outlets in it that I plan to put back into the new wall. One connects to the outlet you see on the wall in that picture and faces out from the new wall into the kitchen area. The other is on the circuit for this room and will face inward from the new wall toward the screen.
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post #14 of 67 Old 01-06-2016, 07:50 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedStripe88 View Post
Another welcome to the forum. I came seeking advice, but stick around for occasional doses of my own desire for therapy and counseling

Yes, your room is small compared to many builds, but you have more than enough room to construct a dedicated theater space that performs well and looks great. That said, I'm biased. My room is similar in size to yours. The room was 16'8" x 12'2" with 8'9" ceilings.
Thank you, it's nice to see that something as nice as your theater is possible in a room so similar to mine. I've been reading through your build thread but have only made it about halfway so far, you really went all out and created an amazing room.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedStripe88 View Post

You've done quite a bit of thinking on layout, but before you start swinging the hammer, a couple items to reduce significant rework and/or "I wish I had done that differently"
1) Figure out your lighting plan (e.g., screen wash, primary room lighting, accent lighting)
2) Determine if you need any HVAC modifications, both supply and return, to keep the room comfortable

On #1 , after you dramatically shrink the size of the soffit around that duct, you could incorporate it into your ceiling design. Perhaps create a double tray ceiling, one tray between the screen and the HVAC with another between the HVAC and the projector. Then, you could put recessed lighting in the side and rear soffits. Put screen wash lighting in the front soffit. And consider accent lighting in the 2 trays using LED strips.

Side note: example of minimal framing around an i-beam to reduce ceiling height loss. You might be able to do something similar with your HVAC duct:

I had been considering something like a double tray ceiling. Originally I was not planning to do any side soffits as my ceiling are already low at 7 1/2 feet (6 1/2' under the HVAC soffit.) The current HVAC soffit is built with a 2x4 going across the bottom and drywall attached. I have been looking at some other methods such as you have suggested building "ladders" on the sides making them even with he bottom of the duct work I can can save at least 1 1/2" on the bottom. But this is only accounting for drywall attached directly to the ladders and not using OSB or MDF in between. Front to back I believe I can shrink the soffit at least 9". There is a support beam in the back side of that soffit as well so the space i can save front to back will mostly come from eliminating the unused space in the front.

I may use some cardboard to mock up a side soffit to see how it would look. I like the idea of making the HVAC soffit "disappear" into the design but I'm still worried the low soffits will make the room seem so small. One advantage I have though is I am only 5'4" tall so the low soffits won't really bother me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedStripe88 View Post
On #2 , the HVAC duct should have more than enough supply air, but you may want to increase the register size to minimize the air noise. Is there a return in the room? If you're not "soundproofing", you could use the space under the door as a return. If you decide to go the sound containment route, there are a few other considerations for both the supply and the return.


With those two plans decided, you may decide to do a bit more demo so you can pull wires and modify HVAC before you switch to building.

Good luck, I'll be following
That room gets plenty of air as the furnace is right beside the room, I usually have to close the vent. There is no return in the room, the return for this floor is on the other side of the stairs in the other room.

I was not planning to go as far as sound proofing the room and after reading through your build thread it really is more work than I was planning to do to this room. However, I am concerned about the rear and side wall which border the bathroom and stairs. These walls are hollow and have no insulation in them and I'm concerned they will rattle from the bass in the room. Would it be beneficial to add some type of blown in insulation just to fill the walls? I really don't want to take the drywall down on every wall and re-insulate.

Thank you for your suggestions.

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post #15 of 67 Old 01-06-2016, 07:08 PM - Thread Starter
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If I added soffits on each side it would look something like the picture below. A rear soffit would be difficult due to the door to the bathroom on the back wall. If I were to add a rear soffit I would need to cut the door down. The front door is not an issue because it was originally under the HVAC soffit and has already been cut down to 6'5". If i do add the side soffits the question then becomes how many and what sized recessed lights go into the soffits?

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post #16 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 07:05 AM
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I like that!


Do the side new soffits have to be at the HVAC soffit height? Seems to me you could try them at half height and 2/3rds too, and clear the door frame.
might be some extra detailing.


I would make the av rack a little bigger, space the gear, and plate off some U space as expansion potential. (Or have some extra shelf spaces.)
You never know what the next big thing might be, or how a future new piece might upset the rack. I've outgrown some racks in this manner.
Over the years, the gear has changed in quantity and sizes, and shrank in quantity too. Might be something you might want to consider...


I would black out the front ceiling too. I assume that is simply an omission with showing off the room.


I would (did) use 4" spots in a small room. I went a little bit unique with Bazz 100 spot lights. Black glass trim ring that is actually cobalt blue when lit.
They came off a reduced rack at $7 each. Wasn't until I wired one up, that I found out they were cobalt blue when lit. One thing about the spots in the low soffit, is
the beam spread won't give great light coverage for the room. A bulb with a wider spread might be something to seek out, add some mixed lights, like a pair of sconces
for better general illumination. Pretty handy when it's time to clean the room.


Next room I plan to use more of the Bazz 100 as screen spots, and Bazz Cubes (sprayed out in black,) for room lighting.
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post #17 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 07:11 AM
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That stripe effect you have going for the HVAC soffit also makes me think you might do a textured "strip" across it.
Some sort of 3D product or painted out monochrome anaglypta wallpaper.


With that tiny added soffit, to the sides of the HVAC soffit, that could be some LED lighting opportunity too.
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post #18 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 07:38 AM
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If all that soffiting has you concerned, you could mock up one side of the room with some cardboard and tape.


Here's the ceiling of my 7'1 tall basement, with 18' of length and 9'5" of width. I disguised an S curve of HVAC (and a lot of other issues) by doing an overly deep AT space (59") which also provides room for a couple of large subs in the room.


I am very pleased with the scale of the room. Came out way better then I dared hoped for, with five soffits at 80". I'm not a tall guy at 5' 6" so that helps, but I also have no concerns with a plan to give up 2" of width, per side, for fabric panel walls. The 54x96" screen feels bigger then it is, even though it's always been a 52x92 or 54x96" screen in this room, for the last 12 years.


One thing about a woven AT screen is it throws light off in an uncontrolled fashion. I'd be tempted to extend the black front wall treatment to the side walls, (to shadowbox the front of the room,) to the far edge of the door. Then do your green side wall.
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post #19 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 10:49 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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I like that!


Do the side new soffits have to be at the HVAC soffit height? Seems to me you could try them at half height and 2/3rds too, and clear the door frame.
might be some extra detailing.


I would make the av rack a little bigger, space the gear, and plate off some U space as expansion potential. (Or have some extra shelf spaces.)
You never know what the next big thing might be, or how a future new piece might upset the rack. I've outgrown some racks in this manner.
Over the years, the gear has changed in quantity and sizes, and shrank in quantity too. Might be something you might want to consider...


I would black out the front ceiling too. I assume that is simply an omission with showing off the room.


I would (did) use 4" spots in a small room. I went a little bit unique with Bazz 100 spot lights. Black glass trim ring that is actually cobalt blue when lit.
They came off a reduced rack at $7 each. Wasn't until I wired one up, that I found out they were cobalt blue when lit. One thing about the spots in the low soffit, is
the beam spread won't give great light coverage for the room. A bulb with a wider spread might be something to seek out, add some mixed lights, like a pair of sconces
for better general illumination. Pretty handy when it's time to clean the room.


Next room I plan to use more of the Bazz 100 as screen spots, and Bazz Cubes (sprayed out in black,) for room lighting.

I feel like if I make the soffits smaller than the HVAC soffit then it would defeat the purpose of making the HVAC soffit "disapear". I estimated the size of the soffits being about 10.5" as that's what I estimate the HVAC soffit will be one I reframe and drywall it. If I remove the top piece of trim from the bathroom door I can only go as low as 9" with the soffit. Cutting the door down and reframing the door jamb is not totally out of the question, it's just more work and more drywall. But if i did that and I were able to add a rear soffit, could that rear soffit house the projector or would the HVAC soffit still be in the way?

I have not yet determined the size of the AV rack, but I get what you're saying abut accounting for future equipment. Right now I only plan to have my AVR, HTPC and Blue Ray DVD player. Also there is a staircase behind that wall that I will need to work with so my height is limited.

The Ceiling will be one color all the way to the front, I have not yet determined what colors I will use but I like the look of the green in the Tanner Ridge Cinema Construction Thread. I would like to find an alternative to going flat black on the ceiling, maybe a dark gray or something.

Not sure i'm a fan of the Bazz Cubes, I think i'd rather use regular recessed lights. I was also thinking 4" though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
That stripe effect you have going for the HVAC soffit also makes me think you might do a textured "strip" across it.
Some sort of 3D product or painted out monochrome anaglypta wallpaper.


With that tiny added soffit, to the sides of the HVAC soffit, that could be some LED lighting opportunity too.
If you are referring to the lines between the HVAC soffit and side soffits, that's just from the way I drew the soffits in sketchup. I was just being lazy and threw the soffits up without cleaning things up. I would also probably take the soffits all the way to the front wall and build the screen up in between them rather than just stopping where the screen starts. I was thinking LED light strips in some crown molding or some kind of lip around the inside of both ceiling trays. Where the soffits meet the screen may need to be thought through though, unless I could add a front soffit of some kind that would extend out over the screen perhaps. but then this has me rethinking doing the AT screen. Maybe it would be better to not do an AT screen, move the screen back against the wall and have more of a shadow box around it. I wasn't planning to build a stage but maybe this is where one may fit in. But then there is the issue of speaker placement. One thing after another, ugh!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
If all that soffiting has you concerned, you could mock up one side of the room with some cardboard and tape.


Here's the ceiling of my 7'1 tall basement, with 18' of length and 9'5" of width. I disguised an S curve of HVAC (and a lot of other issues) by doing an overly deep AT space (59") which also provides room for a couple of large subs in the room.


I am very pleased with the scale of the room. Came out way better then I dared hoped for, with five soffits at 80". I'm not a tall guy at 5' 6" so that helps, but I also have no concerns with a plan to give up 2" of width, per side, for fabric panel walls. The 54x96" screen feels bigger then it is, even though it's always been a 52x92 or 54x96" screen in this room, for the last 12 years.


One thing about a woven AT screen is it throws light off in an uncontrolled fashion. I'd be tempted to extend the black front wall treatment to the side walls, (to shadowbox the front of the room,) to the far edge of the door. Then do your green side wall.
I was concerned about the soffit shrinking the size of the room at first, but after looking at it last night and putting some tape up on the walls where the soffit would be I'm not so concerned, i think it would fit into the room nicely.
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post #20 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 11:27 AM
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That kind of points out what I am saying... You might not need to be tied to what one thinks of, as the obvious thing to do. Do you actually want the soffit to disappear, or use it to add a little detailing to the space, in a zero foot print manner? Soffits won't disappear in a small room. That is just not going to happen, and maybe it's not something you actually want to happen?


That was pretty much my experience with my room, and much of what I did, was trail blazing with a lot of trial and error. You have SketchUp to experiment with.


I skipped a stage. I suspected that would crowd the front of the room too much, with my front 80" soffit. I did do a sand filled stage behind the AT wall.


If you look around, you will see some rooms do have soffits at two levels. You could do your soffits as drawn, and add a front and rear wall soffit, at a shallower height. Wasn't so long ago that nobody would ever add a soffit to a small theater, or create a symmetrical soffit in a room where one already was...


Black actually makes a wall or ceiling recede. But I expect other dark colors will work. You could look up Milano Blue as one alternative example.


LED rope light in the soffit might not work as well as you think.... A dark ceiling might very well soak up much of the light. I've seen this exact effect before.


An AT screen is absolutely the best thing I ever did, in my small room. I wouldn't be so quick to second guess it.
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post #21 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 01:35 PM
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I like the new ceiling design a lot.

I agree with @Tedd , don't worry about making the HVAC soffit disappear. Instead, make it a design element. People will eventually think the soffits are there for aesthetic reasons rather than functional reasons. Many people think I built soffits solely to create a tray ceiling with accent lighting.

Worth considering a shorter height soffit that fits above your door. I'd wonder if you could do 8" for all soffits other than the HVAC soffit. How about one 'U' that starts at the HVAC soffit, down the side wall, across the back wall above the door and then back up the side wall to the HVAC soffit. Then a second 'U' that does the same across the front wall.

Then, install crown molding at uniform height in both trays. That will make the soffits look more uniform in height and provide a location for the LED strips.

You could put 3-4 recessed lights in that front soffit to wash the screen. And, building a front soffit does not require you to build a stage.

I think you'll have to hang the projector from the rear soffit if you want to keep the projector level, clear the HVAC soffit, and avoid cutting down that door to the bathroom.

If you want to avoid a dark black ceiling, a dark blue works quite well. I started with the blue that was used in Mario's Cinemar theater. I went a bit darker for mine. I can't remember which Benjamin Moore shade I used. I agree that the darker tray ceiling color will create the illusion of a much higher ceiling.

In my experience, the LED strip lights reflect pretty well against the dark blue as you can see in the picture of my room in the above post. The LED strips won't light the room, but that shouldn't be their purpose.

Keep the design ideas coming...

My in progress build thread: The Salt Mine
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post #22 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 02:56 PM - Thread Starter
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I really do like the idea of the AT screen and would rather stick with it, the soffit discussion had me thinking of how the front soffits would meet up with the screen. But here is another idea, what if I do the side and rear soffits above the seating area only and leave the front part of the room open? Maybe this would give the feeling of the room opening up to the screen. The door in the front would no longer be crowded under the low soffit. Add a couple of screen wash lights in the ceiling, put some 4" lights in the soffit above the seating area (spacing to be determined) and the LED lights in the tray above the seating area. The side and rear soffits could be 9" all the way around or the sides at 10.5" to match the HVAC and the rear only at 9" Not sure which i like better right now. I drew it with he rear soffit only at 9" to clear the door.


Also, for LED lights, would it hurt to have the all of the ceiling a dark color but have the inside of the tray a lighter color to allow the LED lights to reflect?


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post #23 of 67 Old 01-07-2016, 04:06 PM
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That could work also. Or you could put screens spots in the ceiling of the first design.


I would not go with a lighter color in the soffit opposite the screen, but I would relax in the seating area.
Any light coming off the screen that hits that soffit, would then have the potential to reflect onto the screen.
That would harm your projector's contrast ratio.


To me, the first design emphasizes the soffit and plays it up. The second design plays up the seating half of the room,
which also works. It would also be faster, cheaper, and less work.


A third screen wash spot up front, would bounce even more light into the room, off the screen...


The second design could work really well with disguising the door.
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post #24 of 67 Old 01-11-2016, 07:15 PM - Thread Starter
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I didn't get a lot done this weekend other than taking down the existing HVAC Soffit. Now to determine the best way to reframe it to save as much space as possible. I'm thinking of building 3 ladders, using 2x2s for the top/bottom plates with 2x4s in sideways in between using one in the middle of the soffit. Then attaching the drywall to the ladders.

Below is a drawing of i'm thinking. Do I need to have OSB or MDF between the drywall and ladders? Does anyone see any problems with my plan?




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You could extend the ladders about 1/4 -1/2" past the HAVC, to allow for any potential floor deflection, and do a plywood layer, then 5/8" drywall.
(No drywall screws where the sheet metal resides.)


BigmouthinDC uses metal framing track with wood drops. Might be another way to proceed, and not have to deal with 2x2" and the warps and twists that often come with it. His 2x4" bridging also gets you more wood to sink screws into.
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post #26 of 67 Old 01-11-2016, 09:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Here are a couple of pictures of the duct work as it is now.
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post #27 of 67 Old 02-03-2016, 08:58 PM - Thread Starter
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I've made a bit of progress. The new wall is framed and the steel track ladders are up for the HVAC soffit. I do have a question for the Pros. The soffit spans 48" across the outter ladders with the middle ladder being a little off center at 23" from the ladder by the Beam. I left 1/4" of space below the duct work, should I put up a layer of OSB or plywood or put the drywall directly on the steel track ladders?







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post #28 of 67 Old 02-04-2016, 04:04 PM
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A layer of OSB or plywood would add some mass, and let you secure the 5/8" drywall at 12" intervals.
Shorter screws where the HVAC is.
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post #29 of 67 Old 02-09-2016, 07:39 PM
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Just checking in on you bud. It was nice meeting you Saturday at Kevin's house. I look forward to following your build thread. Looking good already
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post #30 of 67 Old 02-10-2016, 07:27 PM
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I figured I would check in too!

My led lights are the kind that fit in a regular junction box, so are quite shallow. Before you buy the Led lights and Dimmers are fully compatible. Mine are not a perfect match, hence the blinking at the very dim stages.
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