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post #1 of 69 Old 10-07-2017, 03:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Basement Isolation Chamber Theater

I built out, and have been tweaking and improving, my mixed-use HT for about 10 years now. It is currently a mixed-use room, but I'm starting the planning process to converting it to a dedicated home theater. I was particularly inspired by the Rob Hahn theater, though I know I don't have the budget or space to reach those heights. But philosophically I'm hoping to take a similar approach.

I was originally thinking my budget would be about $100k for the whole thing, but after running the general idea by Keith Yates Design, they told me that construction alone would probably run about that. Adding in new gear and upgrades, I'm guessing that the whole project could run to $200k. (And if that's the case, I may postpone by 1 year until I see how certain projects I'm working on pan out.) I'm starting discussions with 2 other companies in the area to get a better sense of what it would take. My thinking is that I'd rather postpone the kickoff of the project and eventually do it right than cut lots of corners.

Here is the current layout:

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The parts of the plan I feel most comfortable saying I'll be doing are:

1. Remove the fireplace and bookshelves from the nothern wall
2. Replace the load bearing pillar with a steel beam
3. Remove the desk/filing cabinet from the southern/western walls
4. Replace the sliding glass door and window from the western wall with drywall (Note: My wife really wants to keep the windows on the street/east side, so I told her I'd do that.)
5. Put in a wall + door to close off the hallway leading from the AV cabinet to the garage (though not sure where exactly that should go since the walls on the south side of the room don't all line up.
6. Replace the door leading to the stairs with a soundproof door
7. Put in Atmos speakers (not sure how many) and go from 5 channels to 11 (not counting Atmos)
8. Wall/room treatments throughout (not sure what I'll need where yet)
9. Put in 100% light blocking motorized blinds/shades in front of the windows on the eastern wall
10. Painting, new carpet, etc.
11. New/upgrade equipment as necessary

The things I'd like to do but still need to research more are:
1. Rotate the theater 180-degrees. Put in a baffle wall along the west wall and mount LCR channels in there with an acoustically transparent screen. (Or should I mount it on the northern wall?)
2. Create a floating room so I can isolate it sonically from the rest of the house. Concerned that I don't have the ceiling height for that though.
3. Replace the ceiling vents with some other heating system (really not sure if that's going to be possible)
4. Possibly do 4-way masking on the screen, but I'm not sure the screen will be big enough for that to make sense. It will more likely be a 2.35:1 screen with fixed height.

Some other info about the house:
1. It's a split level home on a hill, so the floor on the east side of the house is below ground level while the floor on the west side is at ground level.
2. Floor underneath the carpet is concrete.

FWIW, my current gear is a Bryston SP3 pre-amp, Outlaw amp, Paradigm Signature v2 for my 5 channels (S8s for LR, C5 for center, and a pair of ADP3s for the surrounds), 2 JTR Captivator 1400 subwoofers, motorized Stewart Firehawk 120" screen, JVC RS1 projector (ancient, I know!), Oppo BDP-103D, and a few other things. I think I'll need to sell off and replace everything except maybe the Cap 1400s. It's not shown in the diagram, but one of the subs is just to the left of the seating and the other is on the west side of the room under the desk. That's what gave me the best results when I did the sub crawl.

In case the diagram is hard to visualize, here are some actual pics of the room as it exists now. Excuse for the mess.

Facing east from behind the seats. Screen is up:
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Facing east from behind the seats. Screen down:
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Facing west:
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Facing north:
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Facing southeast and the hallway leading to the garage:
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Closeup of hallway leading to the garage:
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So what does everyone think? Any major things I should be thinking about that I'm not already? Anything I'm planning on doing that won't really give me that much bang for the buck?
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post #2 of 69 Old 10-07-2017, 09:49 PM
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You can build a great theater for 100k, you just asked the wrong guy. But you are going to need to roll up your sleeves. Act as the general contractor and supervise selected subs. Do as much yourself as possible.
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post #3 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 05:27 AM
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Are you sticking with a single row of seating?

And where does that hall go to?
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post #4 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 06:06 AM
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That support post elimination would be the first money spent.

I'd be thinking something along the lines of this Waterfall theater. With soffit, treated for first reflections.

The two doors would be fabric covered, with black hardware. No stage. Your subs could be stacked utilizing the closet area.

I would consider a BIG 16x9 screen. Sports events and Blurays concerts go big and bold while movie content would be a little more
intimate . One masking panel.
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post #5 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 06:28 AM
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post #6 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 12:36 PM
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lets talk about the beam. It may not be easy, it will not be cheap and the final result may be a beam that hangs down lower than current beam. The good news a lot of basement finishing carpenters are very wasteful in their approach to framing around duct work and beams. Often when you remove the drywall you will find that there is framing under the beam, this is not necessary and you can span the bottom of the box with just the drywall. That usually means at least 1 1/2 inches of gained headroom. Of course if you are going to rebuild using sound isolation methods that means multiple layers of drywall so some of the gain is lost.

If you are serious about this project you could go ahead and remove the drywall around beam. That will allow any contractor/engineer to take a look at what you have and propose a remedy. Unless the end of the beam is visible from an adjacent room. Just a heads up, you may find the cost of just redoing the beam in excess of $20K, all depends. If you want the beam tucked up in the ceiling, not hanging down it costs more but it can be done. Once you get some quotes you might find it cheaper and a better solution to just move to a different house. Add up all the costs just to make the room suitable for a dedicated home theater. Compare that to the real estate transaction costs of swapping homes to one with a suitable room.
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post #7 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 01:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
lets talk about the beam. It may not be easy, it will not be cheap and the final result may be a beam that hangs down lower than current beam.
I doubt it will hang down that much, the span isn't that big and American houses almost never have blockwork internal walls on the upper stories. You can always recess a steel beam up into the floor joists and/or use multiple smaller beams rather than one large one. I'm doing both of those in my current build; original spec from the structural engineer was a single 600mm deep beam crossing the middle of the ceiling, I got it revised to 5 x 400mm deep beams recessed into the ceiling slab so that only 200mm is showing. The current boxing is probably sized for the HVAC duct.

That said yes it is a lot of hassle with props and sometimes winches to get new beams into an existing house.
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post #8 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 05:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
Are you sticking with a single row of seating?
I'm not 100% sure yet, but I was leaning toward moving to 2 rows of 3 seats each. Right now, the center line is between the two middle seats, so I find myself leaning to one side to try to be as close to center as possible. I'd like to have an odd number of seats to make sure there is at least one that is dead center.

We're a family of 4, but my oldest is a junior in high school, and in all likelihood, she'll have moved out by the time everything is done, since I'm only just now starting the planning process. My wife was saying just 1 row of 3 seats might be enough, but I'd like to have a little wiggle room.

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Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
And where does that hall go to?
If you keep following the hall past the bathroom, you'll get to the laundry room at the end of the hall, and you can then turn left to go to the guest bedroom. I didn't include that level of detail, since I didn't think it would be relevant.
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post #9 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 06:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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That support post elimination would be the first money spent.
Definitely. That has been a must have for me for years! I spoke with our contractor when we remodeled the rest of the house (the only room we didn't touch was the HT, since I was waiting until I could do it right) and he told me that removing that post would probably cost around $5k. Very reasonable!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
I'd be thinking something along the lines of this Waterfall theater. With soffit, treated for first reflections.

The two doors would be fabric covered, with black hardware. No stage. Your subs could be stacked utilizing the closet area.
Was there supposed to be a hyperlink in there? Curious to see this Waterfall theater.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
I would consider a BIG 16x9 screen. Sports events and Blurays concerts go big and bold while movie content would be a little more
intimate . One masking panel.
If I put the screen on the west wall, I definitely have more width, but the ceiling height would be the same. I'm not sure I could fit that much taller a screen in there than I have now, but I could capitalize on the width there. Also, I don't watch sports events or concerts often. Sports events only when a team from a city I've lived in is in the finals - and even then only the last game in the series.

One thing that I've been considering in terms of screen height is actually digging into the foundation and lowering the floor down by about 2-3 feet. That would give me 10-11' of height to work with, which would be great not only for getting a bigger screen, but also in terms of sound isolation and Atmos. I have *no* idea how much lowering the floor by 2-3 feet would cost. I'm guessing not cheap!
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post #10 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 06:06 PM - Thread Starter
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Waterfall picture didn't attach....
D'oh! Disregard my question about "What waterfall theater?"
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! I spoke with our contractor when we remodeled the rest of the house (the only room we didn't touch was the HT, since I was waiting until I could do it right) and he told me that removing that post would probably cost around $5k. Very reasonable!
Yes that is very reasonable, in my area the engineers analysis, a set of plans with the engineers approval required for a county building permit for the structural change, would chew up most of that $5k.
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post #12 of 69 Old 10-08-2017, 06:14 PM - Thread Starter
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lets talk about the beam. It may not be easy, it will not be cheap and the final result may be a beam that hangs down lower than current beam. The good news a lot of basement finishing carpenters are very wasteful in their approach to framing around duct work and beams. Often when you remove the drywall you will find that there is framing under the beam, this is not necessary and you can span the bottom of the box with just the drywall. That usually means at least 1 1/2 inches of gained headroom. Of course if you are going to rebuild using sound isolation methods that means multiple layers of drywall so some of the gain is lost.

If you are serious about this project you could go ahead and remove the drywall around beam. That will allow any contractor/engineer to take a look at what you have and propose a remedy. Unless the end of the beam is visible from an adjacent room. Just a heads up, you may find the cost of just redoing the beam in excess of $20K, all depends. If you want the beam tucked up in the ceiling, not hanging down it costs more but it can be done. Once you get some quotes you might find it cheaper and a better solution to just move to a different house. Add up all the costs just to make the room suitable for a dedicated home theater. Compare that to the real estate transaction costs of swapping homes to one with a suitable room.
Just to be clear, are you referring to the air duct that is running across the top of the ceiling, going from the north wall down the hallway? Or are you talking about the support column in the middle of the room?

If it's the former, you may be right. The duct also services the floor directly above it, so removing it altogether won't really be an option.

If it's the latter, a contract I spoke to said he expected it would probably only run around $5k or so.

And moving is not really an option. We redid the entire house (except for the HT) - including building an addition - about 5 years ago and just have too many memories here. Before we did the whole house remodel, we considered just moving instead, but we decided we wanted to make the house the way we wanted it. When all is said and done, it may wind up that it could have been the same price to raze it to the ground and build from scratch, but at this point, we're too attached to the house the way it is.

In response to another comment, I mentioned that another option I was considering is digging into the foundation and lowering the floor by about 2-3 feet. If I were able to do that, we could keep the ducts where they are, and just isolate them from the HT room. No idea what that might cost, though.
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post #13 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 09:04 AM
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I'm talking about the support post and associated beam.
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post #14 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 09:49 AM
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At $5K, losing that post is the best money that you can spend in the space. You also might spend a little more,
and rework the HVAC up there. I suspect there's a fair amount of room to be had. That's one reason I went with the
single row seat room, is that the HVAC soffit could be treated for first reflection points, to the seating. It also looks like
there might be some space for screen wash spot lights, free of duct work, and they could be put in backer boxes to maintain
isolation of the theater.

Underpinning isn't cheap, benching is cheaper but would cost you width. To me, so much of this comes down to the theater
being a transitional space, and where you want to plant your $$$. You might even get away with just underpinning the front
section of theater. I've been in one room where that was done, in a 7' basement, in a 1920s' home.

Knowing what is outside a theater's foot print can impact on the design of choice. It's not so great to have a home theater
act as a hallway, so I was wondering just how much traffic the unknown spaces might generate.

You might consider grabbing yourself a cheap inspection camera from Harbor Freight, and put a few small holes in the
soffit, and see what exactly is up there.
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post #15 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 12:18 PM
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this is an example of a bonanza of wasted space I discovered on one project.
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post #16 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 12:41 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
At $5K, losing that post is the best money that you can spend in the space. You also might spend a little more,
and rework the HVAC up there. I suspect there's a fair amount of room to be had. That's one reason I went with the
single row seat room, is that the HVAC soffit could be treated for first reflection points, to the seating. It also looks like
there might be some space for screen wash spot lights, free of duct work, and they could be put in backer boxes to maintain
isolation of the theater.

Underpinning isn't cheap, benching is cheaper but would cost you width. To me, so much of this comes down to the theater
being a transitional space, and where you want to plant your $$$. You might even get away with just underpinning the front
section of theater. I've been in one room where that was done, in a 7' basement, in a 1920s' home.

Knowing what is outside a theater's foot print can impact on the design of choice. It's not so great to have a home theater
act as a hallway, so I was wondering just how much traffic the unknown spaces might generate.

You might consider grabbing yourself a cheap inspection camera from Harbor Freight, and put a few small holes in the
soffit, and see what exactly is up there.
Agreed that it's not ideal that way traffic flows through the house, there will sometimes be people just passing through the theater. It's usually not so much the guest room and laundry room, since people only go in there when doing laundry or we have a guest, but the garage. Sometimes my wife or daughter will come home while I'm watching a movie and come into the space. Fortunately, they don't have to cross the room. It's more along the side. Also, I primarily watch movies during the evening, so people probably won't be coming and going too often. Since it's not a new construction, I'm willing to live with that.

Interesting that you can underpin one side but not the other. I would have assumed you have to do either underpinning or benching. I don't necessarily mind giving up space along the east-west direction. If shrinking it from 24'10" down to 20'10" can give me ceiling heights of 9'10", I think that tradeoff could be worth it. Same thing about bringing in the northern wall by a couple feet if needed for benching. Of course, I don't know how much $ I could save by doing benching. One YT video I saw on the topic suggested that underpinning runs about $35-45k to lower the floor by 2' and benching would be about 2/3 that, so around $25-30k or so.

Reworking the HVAC is something I'd really like to do as well. That duct services both the HT and the living/dining room directly above it. If I go to the trouble of lowering the floor, I'm thinking about putting in some kind of floor heating so the vent only services the top floor. The goal would be to be able to isolate the HVAC noise as well as hopefully slim down the profile of the vent. I'm not sure if floor heating is efficient with carpeting though. Fortunately, I don't really have to worry about air conditioning as it doesn't really get that hot where I live even in the summer.
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post #17 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 12:42 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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this is an example of a bonanza of wasted space I discovered on one project.
That's probably about a foot of wasted space!
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after





the before:

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post #19 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 02:53 PM - Thread Starter
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Not seeing the After pic...
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post #20 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 06:02 PM
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I have been in one local home theater that had the front of the room dropped, and the "riser" is the original basement floor.
Pretty darn impressive. The lower floor also got hot water radiant heating, that utilized the hot water tank and a heat exchanger
the size of a fist. What was even more impressive in how fast it worked.

My own experience redoing a soffit in my small space, was that it may have been the best money spent in the room. Moved the central vac over to
the support beam, redid the HVAC with new sheet metal in a wider/more shallow profile, and the new soffit is about 40% of the size of the old soffit.
I gained a couple of inches of headroom despite the new soffit being 3/4" ply/GG/ 5/8" drywall/GG/ 5/8" drywall.
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hmmm, now?

Nope. Wonder why? It's not even showing up as a thumbnail...
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post #22 of 69 Old 10-09-2017, 10:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes, now it works! And in the original post too!
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post #23 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 10:57 AM - Thread Starter
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I took the opportunity to take my existing dimensions and put in some modifications for how I think the new layout should be. Curious to get some feedback.

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The idea is that I would dig into the foundation and lower the floor enough so that I'd have 10' of ceiling space and the vent could be isolated and only servicing the top floor. It's not shown in the diagram, but I'd want to put in some kind of floor heating system. Also not shown in the diagram are the Atmos speakers. I'm thinking 4 Atmos speakers should be about right.

I moved all of the walls in by about 2" to create a floating room for noise isolation.

I was thinking about it, and I'm leaning toward keeping the 4 chairs I have now. It's a little asymmetric, but the 3rd chair from the left would be directly in line with the center of the screen. The reason for not doing 2 rows of 3 chairs is that almost all of the time, I watch movies either alone or with my immediate family. If I have friends over, more often than not my family doesn't join, so I think it'd be a waste of money to put in all of that extra seating I'll never use just for the aesthetics.

I also put in a wall along the south side of the room to close it off from the hallway leading to the garage. That door, as well as the door leading to the upstairs would be soundproof doors.

Because of the elevation difference, I am thinking of putting in some stairs that lead into and out of the room. The diagramming tool I used didn't have the exact kind of stairs I was thinking about, so ignore the curving arrows, and assume they also are in matching carpet.

The red football shaped things are where the surround speakers would go. I'm leaning toward a 9.2.4 setup. (Or perhaps adding more subs. Can never have too many subs. )

Also thinking of taking the closet and the area where I currently have my AV gear and making it into a larger equipment area. I forgot to put a door in the diagram, but I'm thinking of having it will open into the HT and have acoustic paneling on it.

I wasn't sure how to convert the eastern wall of the room to a floating room concept, since it has windows. (Windows that I've told my wife I will keep.)

One question I had is about that weird indentation in the upper right of the diagram. The side surrounds and the rear surrounds will not be symmetrical. I'm sure we can put in some bass traps or other acoustic paneling. Another option if I wanted to keep the room as a rectangle would be to move the wall into the room so it lines up with the door from the stairs. I didn't want to do it that way since then I'd have this weird approximately 3' gap between the HT and the bathroom. I could probably use it for storage, but I think it'd look weird.

Anyway, thoughts on this approach?
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post #24 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 11:17 AM
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Another option if I wanted to keep the room as a rectangle would be to move the wall into the room so it lines up with the door from the stairs.
That's what I would do, to maintain symmetry. Still end up with a 16'8" room width, which is plenty wide.

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post #25 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 02:02 PM
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$200K seems like a gob load of money to do that room. In fact, that would allow you some pretty amazing gear or some type of architecturally unique features and high end finish work.

I did my room for $30K in equipment and speakers (All good to great gear) +$5K for bar stools and couch, $3K in LVE labor and design (including calibration) and $2K for all lighting and control. So somewhere around $40 to $50K. We even have manufactured quartz counters and bar in that price and they the counter was $5K. Also 1 motorized room darkening shade.

For your room, if you hire a contractor build costs should be $100 to $200 per sq ft. That's $85,000 for the whole thing. Demolition and getting rid of that beam may cost but even I, who is not very handy can act as the General and find framers, wall board, and a decent LVE crew. (I stink at dressing out stuff). So, I guess you could spend $200K if you went with top shelf gear and furniture and hired absolutely the whole build out. But..... if you have time, I'd try doing some to a lot of the work yourself. My room also started for additional cost at framing. Framing was part of the purchase price of the house but additional sound treatment was not

As for the space. That's a pretty big area with a very low ceiling. So, as others have mentioned if you can gain height in the ceiling and get the room up a good 9 inches, that would really give you more and better options. Our room is 10' high and that is pretty damn tall, so tall I actually raised the floors 5 inches so final height is 9" 7", just right for our smaller room. You could use 10' depending on how you lay it all out. Certainly if you use the whole space for a theater. Digging might get spendy.

To that end and since you are just starting planning, try and think outside the box. You have been watching with your family in that room for some time so try and rethink what to do with the space.

1). You want a dedicated theater. That's a big space for 3 seats. Why not consider some other possibilities?
A). Classic Theater Seating as you described?
B). A bar area or counter behind?
C). Maybe a Media Access Room for your gear (You have that potential closet to kill - Also your gear is right next to your furnace: presently at least). I have small media access room but it does duty to house all gather home gear. It gets warm without the fan on. Ventilation and HVAC will need to be upgraded, most likely?
D). What about a small Game area, Foyer? If you truly are designing for 3 seats, could your Theater be smaller and you add some other use for space? Again, my media room is only 14 by 17 ish and it is quite decent size for 10 to 11 people. Maybe you go place the screen on the long wall and make say a 15' by 17' to 19" room designed for just 4 or 6 people (I note the space by the AV Gear and that is where you get the variable 17 to 19 feet)? You could then have 7 or 8' by 17' for something different. If the screen goes on the Fireplace area you could split the East side of the room into the theater and repurpose/rip out the closet for an access room, then the West side of the room could be actually another room, with maybe a bar/poker area/Pinballs/Office/I don't know.
E). How big is your total house? I am not a realtor nor do I play one on TV but if it's not fairly large will someone else want to pay for a large Theater? I would! Not so much most people. Case in point, our new development has 6 large homes between 4,700 and 5,600 sq ft and I am the only person who wanted dedicated movie/TV room. Other neighbors still have projectors and such but not in a media purpose designed room. If you fill the whole space, you have almost 420 sq ft dedicated to the room. If your home is 2600 sq ft could you be actually hurting the homes value?

Oh heck.... Build a huge impressive room. That's what this thread is about.... Glad to help.


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post #26 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 02:18 PM - Thread Starter
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That's what I would do, to maintain symmetry. Still end up with a 16'8" room width, which is plenty wide.
Here's what it would look like symmetrical.

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2 issues with this, 1 of which was present in the last diagram that I just didn't notice.

1. The speaker on the top right would either get hit by the door or have to be placed relatively high on the wall. Unfortunately, I don't think it'll be possible to have the door swing into the stairwell leading upstairs. (That issue is also present in the other diagram.)

2. There's a big dead space that I have no idea what to do with.
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post #27 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 02:40 PM - Thread Starter
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$200K seems like a gob load of money to do that room. In fact, that would allow you some pretty amazing gear or some type of architecturally unique features and high end finish work.
One would think! But it's already looking like I'd have to cut some corners on stuff I'd ideally like to do. Of course, I could blow the entire budget just on speakers alone!

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if you have time, I'd try doing some to a lot of the work yourself.
Not really an option for me. I can do tech stuff, but I have zero skills in 3D meatspace.

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As for the space. That's a pretty big area with a very low ceiling. So, as others have mentioned if you can gain height in the ceiling and get the room up a good 9 inches, that would really give you more and better options. Our room is 10' high and that is pretty damn tall, so tall I actually raised the floors 5 inches so final height is 9" 7", just right for our smaller room. You could use 10' depending on how you lay it all out. Certainly if you use the whole space for a theater. Digging might get spendy.
Agreed. What I'm seeing online is that it would be roughly $35k just for the labor. Not sure what the engineering work would cost. I was thinking of going to 10' so I'd have the space to do Atmos, ceiling treatments, and a floating room.

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A). Classic Theater Seating as you described?
Yes, I think that's the way I'm going to go. Right now I'm leaning toward keeping it at 4 seats even though it'll look a bit odd and asymmetrical. I want one of the seats to be aligned dead center. That'll be my seat. The other seats are for friends and family when they want to join me. In all honesty, I'd say 75% of the time, I'm using the theater alone...

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B). A bar area or counter behind?
Personally not a fan of that concept. Kind of like the Rob Hahn theater, I really want the focus to be on the viewing/listening experience. A bar/counter is great for watching sports, since you can hang out at the back, drink beer, and chat while watching the game. I'm trying to go for an immersive movie experience.

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C). Maybe a Media Access Room for your gear (You have that potential closet to kill - Also your gear is right next to your furnace: presently at least). I have small media access room but it does duty to house all gather home gear. It gets warm without the fan on. Ventilation and HVAC will need to be upgraded, most likely?
Agreed. In the latest diagram I put up (about 2 posts back?) I show an expanded area for the gear. I'll definitely have to consider cooling options in there.

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D). What about a small Game area, Foyer? If you truly are designing for 3 seats, could your Theater be smaller and you add some other use for space? Again, my media room is only 14 by 17 ish and it is quite decent size for 10 to 11 people. Maybe you go place the screen on the long wall and make say a 15' by 17' to 19" room designed for just 4 or 6 people (I note the space by the AV Gear and that is where you get the variable 17 to 19 feet)? You could then have 7 or 8' by 17' for something different. If the screen goes on the Fireplace area you could split the East side of the room into the theater and repurpose/rip out the closet for an access room, then the West side of the room could be actually another room, with maybe a bar/poker area/Pinballs/Office/I don't know.
My wife was actually suggesting that I split the room in half and make the east side into an office and the west side a dedicated theater. That would solve the traffic flow problem, but I'm a little concerned that it would feel too much like a shoebox. Even though a lot of the time I'll just be in there myself, I like the roomy feel to the theater and would want to keep that.

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E). How big is your total house? I am not a realtor nor do I play one on TV but if it's not fairly large will someone else want to pay for a large Theater? I would! Not so much most people. Case in point, our new development has 6 large homes between 4,700 and 5,600 sq ft and I am the only person who wanted dedicated movie/TV room. Other neighbors still have projectors and such but not in a media purpose designed room. If you fill the whole space, you have almost 420 sq ft dedicated to the room. If your home is 2600 sq ft could you be actually hurting the homes value?
It's about 3200 square feet, and you definitely raise a valid concern. To some people it would be a huge value add, but for many others, it could impair the overall value. My wife and I decided a while ago that we plan on staying here forever, so I'm not *that* concerned with resale value, but it is something that gnaws at the back of my mind. We actually did a major home remodel about 5 years ago - every room except the HT. My guess is that if we were to sell now, we may not get that full amount back since that would price it out of the neighborhood. Our area keeps increasing in value because of proximity to schools and being so close to Microsoft but we've definitely put more into the house than most in our area. Before we kicked off the home remodel project we had to think hard about whether it would just be better to sell the house and build a new one from scratch or just move somewhere else, but we decided to make this house into our dream house.

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Oh heck.... Build a huge impressive room. That's what this thread is about.... Glad to help.
Hehe... That's the plan!
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post #28 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 06:50 PM
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And yet, it could still be a very affordable higher end room, on a whole less money.

You could stack the subs, and that side closet could be hard working with a filler sub, or two. And hide the HVAC.

You actually could shrink down the space and still utilize high end design. (BTW, a counter isn't such a great idea with ATMOS. That is a nice
large reflective slab for the overhead channels to bounce sound off of...)
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post #29 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 07:14 PM
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Not my build but this looks pretty darn nice. My counter is somewhat behind the 4 Atmos speakers so, so far, not much affect on sound reflection issues. But your original design is quite large for 4 viewers. Also in the previous renderings, I would note that 4K material should be viewed a bit close than 1080P and the seats are back a bit. As noted, start with how you like to watch movies in a theater. Up close or back deep in the theater. That should help you design seat placement. With a 120 to 130 diagonal 16:9 Screen you are back a bit. If you go 2.35:1 and primarily watch movies, it might be OK? Beyond my pay grade though. Your call.

If you do, do one big room, that is when I would throw a potential counter or bar area in but that blows the whole traditional theater feel.



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post #30 of 69 Old 10-10-2017, 10:36 PM - Thread Starter
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You could stack the subs, and that side closet could be hard working with a filler sub, or two. And hide the HVAC.
I'd like to do some simulations of ideal sub placement spots given the room dimensions. I did the pub crawl for the current location I have now, but it's hard to depend on that for dual subs.

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You actually could shrink down the space and still utilize high end design.
The concept you sketched out is an interesting one that I hadn't considered before. The space doesn't feel too large right now because of the bookcases and computer desk in the room, but if that was all emptied out, it could seem too big for just the 4 seats. The size you suggested may not be a bad idea and would also allow me to have zero windows. My wife suggested something similar, but it was more along the lines of just dividing the room in half, so it would be a long narrow room, which I really didn't like.

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(BTW, a counter isn't such a great idea with ATMOS. That is a nice large reflective slab for the overhead channels to bounce sound off of...)
Yeah, not really considering a counter. But still, love all of the ideas!
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