Projector Port - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 7 Old 05-17-2019, 12:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Projector Port Hole

I am eagerly awaiting a new RS3000 which requires an increased throw distance than what I have available for my current projector. As such, I won't be able to ceiling mount in the same location. What I have decided to do is create a port in the rear wall of my theater and have a shelf constructed behind the wall. Also, I think I will likely add a Paladin DCR to the mix.

So my questions: what are the optimal dimensions for the port? What is the optimal vertical and horizontal placement for the port? I may be constrained horizontally by wall studs and would prefer just to fit the port between them - easiest solution if viable.

I do not plan to undertake the construction myself but since it is a minimal project I will just hire a local builder/carpenter.

Last edited by nbynw; 05-17-2019 at 08:40 PM.
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post #2 of 7 Old 05-17-2019, 05:10 PM
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I was going to build a port to keep fan noise at bay. I still might but my Sony vents to the front. So I have shied away for now. Might be a future project.
I did build a cubby above my in wall AV rack for it. Jet black paint inside with a black projector, it is out of sight and out of mind till the projector is on. So it may be an option just to build an in wall cubby and hide the projector up there.

But back to your question. I did research and buy glass for the port/window. So I think I can point you in the right direction. First window should be at a slight angle to prevent back glare and reflections. Around 10 degrees off plumb is all it takes. Your port should be made of the highest transmission glass you can find. Stuff from the local glass fabrication shop is not up to the task clarity wise.


So how big? Well that was answered for me by the sources I found for high performance glass online. The stuff they stock is in precut sizes. up to about 10 in x 12 in size. which is more than enough for the front lens on your projector. The link below is where I bought my glass. I think it was around $40 delivered. They usually supply laboratories with glass. So what it arrived it was packaged like lab grade and looks like serious stuff. currently stored in my workshop...


https://www.edmundoptics.com/f/anti-...windows/12261/


Good Luck
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post #3 of 7 Old 05-17-2019, 05:14 PM
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Here is a link to a post I made regarding port glass angle.


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post #4 of 7 Old 05-17-2019, 05:19 PM
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Well if I ever build my port...I will have to experiment with the glass tilt apparently. Good post.
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post #5 of 7 Old 05-19-2019, 02:40 AM
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Great topic been thinking about this myself.

When/if someone was to do this, would you just use one pane of glass or use two to provide some sort of soundproofing?
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post #6 of 7 Old 05-21-2019, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nbynw View Post
So my questions: what are the optimal dimensions for the port? What is the optimal vertical and horizontal placement for the port? I may be constrained horizontally by wall studs and would prefer just to fit the port between them - easiest solution if viable.
I guess optimally the smaller the better, so it would be best to have an idea of how far back your projector can sit and still get proper ventilation. Then it's a bit of triangle geometry to figure out if the projected image will clear the port.

What I did instead, is kind of let the dimensions of my glass determine the size of the port hole. A lot of people around here recommend getting proper optics glass, which will have exceptional clarity, and minimize reflection. That being said it's still a good idea to angle the glass 10-15 degrees to avoid reflections going back into the projector. This is what is recommended a lot from my experience:

https://www.edmundoptics.com/p/2032-...y-window/5443/

That is part number 43-974, if the link stops working sometime in the future.

It's an 8x10" sheet of glass.

For my port I planned on a 15 degree forward angle, and then due to measuring inside on both measurements, I wound up with about a 12 degree angle, which should also be fine. I got some 3/4" birch for mine, and then used a table saw and the little angle compass thing to cut the inlet to depth, at the proper angle (this was challenging, and yeah, I might have had to redo once or twice). I cut it about 1/4" deep, and then used quarter inch thick weather stripping to seal as well as i could around the glass. When planning the height and width of the port, I cut it about 1/4" shorter than the glass. The inlet, plus that cut, plus the stripping means it stays tight, compressing the stripping around 1/8 on each side. Attached some pictures to help explain a bit.

I plan on having another layer of wood on the outside to kind of help "seal" the port into place against the drywall.

Edit: although according to mhutchins, I might need to reconsider my forward angle.. luckily I can just flip it around to get a minus 12 angle. Might need to draw it out similarly to get an idea of reflections.

Edit Edit: Also regarding placement, creating a box in the framing so that you have the port centered isn't too big of a deal, especially for new construction. It's essentially just a slim window framing up high. If you already have drywall, it's a little more tricky, but not impossible.
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Last edited by sigma722; 05-21-2019 at 11:42 AM.
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post #7 of 7 Old 05-22-2019, 08:54 AM
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I went down the hush box road, but this post here gave me nightmares afterwards.

Its not my post, but some of the reasoning is pretty sound on whether to even bother. I regret not heeding this advice before it was too late.

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-de...l#post55095174
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