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post #91 of 124 Old 11-07-2019, 08:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audioguy View Post
I don't know how low the beam hangs down but make sure it does not block the output of the rear heights. If it does, just mount the rear heights in some kind of attractive enclosure that will hang down and allow those rear heights to see the MLP!
The beam comes down 10" from the rest of the ceiling.
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post #92 of 124 Old 11-07-2019, 08:43 PM
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The beam comes down 10" from the rest of the ceiling.

That should be no issue.
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post #93 of 124 Old 11-08-2019, 07:24 AM
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There's no issue currently presenting itself since the diagram is not to scale and with no thinking being applied to where the seats might best be located, for smooth audio
response at this point. I expect the seating will end up further back in the room, once you start to get past the rough layout stage. The seating as presented there, looks
to plant front row ears right where you don't want them.

You could drop the overhead speakers, but maybe you might prefer the extra separation between seats and speakers? I wouldn't be so quick to give that up, if I could avoid it.
It might not turn out to be something that cannot be avoided, but I would want to be sure, my overhead speakers don't end up right where the beam is.
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post #94 of 124 Old 11-08-2019, 08:08 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
There's no issue currently presenting itself since the diagram is not to scale and with no thinking being applied to where the seats might best be located, for smooth audio
response at this point. I expect the seating will end up further back in the room, once you start to get past the rough layout stage. The seating as presented there, looks
to plant front row ears right where you don't want them.

You could drop the overhead speakers, but maybe you might prefer the extra separation between seats and speakers? I wouldn't be so quick to give that up, if I could avoid it.
It might not turn out to be something that cannot be avoided, but I would want to be sure, my overhead speakers don't end up right where the beam is.
I've hired Nyal with Acoustic Frontiers to design the room and treatment plan for me. We'll have to wait and see what he comes up with and go from there.
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post #95 of 124 Old 11-08-2019, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Wong View Post
I've hired Nyal with Acoustic Frontiers to design the room and treatment plan for me. We'll have to wait and see what he comes up with and go from there.


I think that’s a great idea. I was getting ready to post that you might consider hiring someone. I’m sure you’ll be in good hands


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post #96 of 124 Old 11-09-2019, 12:31 PM
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Not sure what's above the theater, but if you can nail down about where your ceiling speakers are going, you have a better chance of avoiding any conflicts with plumbing runs which often can be adjusted. Looks like HVAC is already in.

Regards, John
Video: Digital Projection 330 HighLite HC, Stewart 1.3, Radiance Pro, Anamorphic Lens
Audio: Trinnov Altitude16, QSC iCore250, QSC DCA 1622 Amps
Speakers: Procella P8's, P6V's, P18, Triad Silvers Atmos 11.3.4
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post #97 of 124 Old 11-09-2019, 05:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dormie1360 View Post
Not sure what's above the theater, but if you can nail down about where your ceiling speakers are going, you have a better chance of avoiding any conflicts with plumbing runs which often can be adjusted. Looks like HVAC is already in.
The kitchen, powder room, laundry, and mud room are above my theater room. So there is piping running between the ceiling joists in certain areas in addition to the HVAC.

A ceiling cloud could be a way around piping and HVAC for optimal speaker placement.
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post #98 of 124 Old 11-12-2019, 03:49 PM - Thread Starter
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Christmas arrived early this year. Opening it up to make sure it works and then packing it up until I'm ready to use it in the new house.

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post #99 of 124 Old 11-12-2019, 04:07 PM
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post #100 of 124 Old 11-12-2019, 07:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Ran into some trouble with the new PJ. Tried updating the firmware but it won't recognize the USB drive. I posted in the JVC thread and several others have had this issue also. They said I have to try multiple USB drives. I've tried 2 so far, have to order some more to try it.
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post #101 of 124 Old 11-12-2019, 07:47 PM
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post #102 of 124 Old 11-12-2019, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Wong View Post
Ran into some trouble with the new PJ. Tried updating the firmware but it won't recognize the USB drive. I posted in the JVC thread and several others have had this issue also. They said I have to try multiple USB drives. I've tried 2 so far, have to order some more to try it.
If you're near Atlanta I have a few USB drives you can try as long as I get to check out the new PJ in action...

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post #103 of 124 Old 11-13-2019, 04:43 AM - Thread Starter
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If you're near Atlanta I have a few USB drives you can try as long as I get to check out the new PJ in action...

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
I'm not too far from ATL but the PJ isn't setup for actual viewing. I'm moving into a new house where I'm building a new theater room in a few months. I came across a great deal on the PJ & lens so I jumped on it even though I can't use them yet. Thanks for the offer though! We can talk again about seeing the PJ after the build is finished.
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post #104 of 124 Old 11-13-2019, 05:04 AM
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The Good News: You have plenty of time to resolve whatever the issue is so that when your theater is complete, your PJ will be ready to go.
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post #105 of 124 Old 11-14-2019, 05:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Successfully updated to v3.10 with the first new flash drive I tried today. Can't explain it but glad it worked.

Also received this in the mail today:
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post #106 of 124 Old 11-18-2019, 08:32 AM - Thread Starter
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A bit off topic but I thought I'd ask here. I'm deciding on insulated garage doors for the new house. It's come down to two choices:

A) R-17.54 1-7/8" Polyurethane $5810 upgrade
B) R-7.94 1-3/8" Polystyrene $400 upgrade

The house is in the south, along the border of SC and GA. The garage won't be used to park our cars, we will be using it for storage/utility and as a home gym. It is a 2 car garage and the garage door faces north. Is an R value of 7.94 good enough to be able to workout "comfortably" in the dead of summer/winter months?
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post #107 of 124 Old 11-18-2019, 05:40 PM
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A bit off topic but I thought I'd ask here. I'm deciding on insulated garage doors for the new house. It's come down to two choices:

A) R-17.54 1-7/8" Polyurethane $5810 upgrade
B) R-7.94 1-3/8" Polystyrene $400 upgrade

The house is in the south, along the border of SC and GA. The garage won't be used to park our cars, we will be using it for storage/utility and as a home gym. It is a 2 car garage and the garage door faces north. Is an R value of 7.94 good enough to be able to workout "comfortably" in the dead of summer/winter months?
My initial reaction to this is $5,400ish is a RIDICULOUS sum of money if all that is is the difference between an R rating. Don't even get the "upgrade" and get the cheapest single-panel doors the builder will install. After you close get your own 3-layer doors and if you shop around enough you'll be shocked by little they cost. We recently had our double car door replaced for about $1,000 including labor to install and the single door (1' taller) was like $700ish installed. That was an R10.5 rating. I bet if you really want to get super high R-rating doors you can do far far better after the fact. We even sold our old crappy builder-grade doors for about half of what the new doors cost and the double car door was even wadded up. lol

Jer

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post #108 of 124 Old 11-19-2019, 07:00 AM
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I suspect the color choice might just impact more then the difference in insulation factor. I also suspect the upgrade comes with a lot of other features,
to help justify the $5410 upgrade cost over the B option.
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post #109 of 124 Old 11-19-2019, 07:06 AM - Thread Starter
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Option B comes with tinted windows, faux wood finish with nice trim work. I think though I've been convinced to get the cheapest option now, non-insulated door, and upgrade myself later. I'd rather spend the money in my theater room anyhow.
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post #110 of 124 Old 11-19-2019, 09:04 AM
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Option B comes with tinted windows, faux wood finish with nice trim work. I think though I've been convinced to get the cheapest option now, non-insulated door, and upgrade myself later. I'd rather spend the money in my theater room anyhow.
I think you'll be much happier with this decision as time rolls along. Just don't forget to prioritize it once you close and get settled.

Jer

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post #111 of 124 Old 12-02-2019, 11:49 AM - Thread Starter
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I took advantage of bundling the drywall I'll be needing for the room and had it delivered with the drywall for the rest of the house. 72 sheets of 4 1/2 x 12 5/8". They were delivered leaning against the wall on its long side. I tried picking one up in the middle and didn't have the grip strength to get it off the ground. I managed to lift one end off the ground, but it felt pretty heavy. I am planning on using a drywall lift but just thinking about lifting it from the ground and onto the lift is making me rethink things.

Any tips for handling the drywall? I think once it's on the lift it's manageable, the problem is getting it on there. I think I may need to bribe a friend to help me with this stage when the time comes.

BTW, I have a bad lower back, hurt it during my time in the army. So just muscling my way through this isn't really a smart or good idea for me.
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post #112 of 124 Old 12-02-2019, 12:13 PM
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BTW, I have a bad lower back, hurt it during my time in the army. So just muscling my way through this isn't really a smart or good idea for me.

You may want to re-consider not hanging the drywall yourself. I, too, have a bad back so am sympathetic to your situation. Lifting something that heavy AND large may end up costing you way more (with more negative long term impact) than hiring out the installation job. Maybe you can find someone who will hang it but let you do the taping, sanding and finish work. Even using a buddy or two will still result in lots of weight lifting.
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post #113 of 124 Old 12-02-2019, 01:00 PM
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A 4x8' sheet of 5/8" drywall is 75 pounds, so those sheets are north of 120 pounds each. There's also a fair amount of twisting and bending involved in securing the
drywall when you are working with your arms over your head, for the ceiling. With a bad back, I am not sure if there's any way to safely handle the job, so that would
be +1 to audioguy's recommendation and reservations. You only get one back.

As for sanding drywall, it's not expensive to get the right tools, but it also is a pretty good full body work out.
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post #114 of 124 Old 12-03-2019, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
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A 4x8' sheet of 5/8" drywall is 75 pounds, so those sheets are north of 120 pounds each. There's also a fair amount of twisting and bending involved in securing the
drywall when you are working with your arms over your head, for the ceiling. With a bad back, I am not sure if there's any way to safely handle the job, so that would
be +1 to audioguy's recommendation and reservations. You only get one back.

As for sanding drywall, it's not expensive to get the right tools, but it also is a pretty good full body work out.
I'm with Tedd and Audioguy here. If you can swing it, hire this job out. Injuring yourself more will be a real bummer...

Roll Tide.
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post #115 of 124 Old 12-03-2019, 09:13 AM
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For theater construction with unique sound isolation methods it is a best to hire a team who you supervise rather than just hiring them for the job and hoping for the best. You hang the channel and maybe man the Speed Loader with the Green Glue and the the caulk gun but let them do all the lifting. Later hire someone to do the finishing, tape and mud.

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post #116 of 124 Old 12-04-2019, 07:06 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback, I'll be getting some quotes from local drywall people when the time comes. I think I can manage the GG and caulking parts, can't let them have all the fun.

On a more positive note this week I've started my design project with Nyal! I filled out a detailed discovery questionaire and need to go measure out and draw up some specifics that they've requested.
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post #117 of 124 Old 12-04-2019, 07:12 AM
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SOMETHING I WROTE A WHILE BACK


Installing Drywall in High Performance
Sound Isolated Home Theaters


· Drywall insulation in High Performance home theaters involves using extra Mass; Hanging the drywall on a mechanical vibration Isolation clip and channel system, and utilizing a viscoelastic component between the layers of drywall for Dampening.
· Two layers of 5/8 drywall are used, avoid use of “ultra-lightweight versions of drywall as they provide less mass in the final system
· Green Glue is used as the Dampening agent and is applied between layers of drywall
· Isolation clips and 25 gauge 7/8 inch tall hat channel must be installed beforehand per manufacturer’s instructions
· Install drywall in the following sequence: first layer on ceiling, first layer on walls, second layer on ceiling, second layer on walls. This results in a cascading joint where the walls meet the ceiling. This joint is tighter and will control sound better than alternatives.
· Starting with the first layer on the ceiling using 1 ¼ inch screws intended for metal framing (I like Grabber brand) mount the drywall perpendicular to the channels. Keep the drywall panels at least ½ inch away from the wall framing so the panels can vibrate without rubbing on the wall framing, It sometimes helps to insert spacers that you pull down after the panels are up. These can be simply screwed to the wall studs hanging down enough to provide a hand hold when you are read to remove them. If you use longer screws you risk hitting a ceiling joist and defeating the isolation design.
· Use at least 5 screws for each 4 ft. section into the channel, do not over spin the screws as that will strip the metal holes. You do not need to dimple the screw holes on the first layer, just get them reasonably flat.
· Don’t use the screws to pull the drywall tight, instead push it up while screwing, this will insure the most secure fastening.
· Stagger the seams from row to row of drywall
· Once the ceiling is finished install drywall on the walls. Lift the drywall up until it just makes contact with the ceiling panels but do not force the drywall which would lift the ceiling panels. Again first layer is 1 ¼ inch screws.
· Once the ceiling and walls are covered with the first layer apply a generous bead of acoustical caulk the wall/ceiling joint making it airtight. Do the same for inside corners on the walls and where the drywall meets the floor. If there are holes cut around any conduit, wires, electrical boxes any gaps need to be caulked. Lastly if any butt joints are not tight, caulk them. Green Glue brand sealant, OSI or USG brand acoustical sealant can be used.
· Once the caulking is complete install the second layer of drywall using 2 inch screws designed for metal studs. Screws should hit the metal channel where possible but hanging edges of the second layer can be screwed to the first layer with 1 ¼ to 1 5/8 course thread screws.
· Apply two full Speed Loader draws of Green Glue to each 4x8 sheet of drywall before positioning on the wall. Do not use less than this amount and it should be applied directly to panel in random squiggly patterns, do not trowel.
· The seams from the first layer must overlap the second layer. So if you started with a full sheet, start with a ½ sheet (Lengthwise) for the second layer and adjust lengths to overlap every seam.
· Do not think of the Green Glue as a glue as it takes weeks for it to cure. Use at least the same number of screws as the first layer, Hitting the channel where possible.
· Once the second layer is installed caulk the same as the first layer. In most home theater designs the wall ceiling joints and inside corners will be hidden by molding and other interior finishes so rather than worrying about getting too much caulk which might cause a sloppy corner tape and mud joint, worry about creating an airtight seal. Nobody will see the taped joints. If the design is such that a corner joint will be a visible painted joint, scrape all the excess caulk out of the corners with your finger.


Tips for working with Green Glue

· Buy Green Glue (GG) in 5 gallon buckets to save money. Also get the Speed Loader application gun. It’s like a giant syringe that you use to draw the GG up from the bucket and squirt on the drywall. Also have a pint of Acetone handy.
· Lubricate the Gun periodically with WD40
· Two full loads of GG are required for each 4x8 sheet, more if using larger panels
· Stick the gun in the GG only up the base of the nozzle, any deeper and you will be getting GG on your hands for the rest of the day
· Have a 5 gallon bucket 2/3 full of warm water with a generous amount of dish soap handy when you are starting the day. Also a couple of clean shop towels that you can get wet and wipe up spills. A puddle of GG is a magnet for your shoes and you will track it around the project site resulting in the equivalent of Fly Paper. Clean up your spills.
· After you have emptied two loads onto the drywall, make sure the gun is empty and stick it in the bucket of water rather than trying to find a place to lay the gun as it will drip all over and create a mess. The water will keep any remaining GG from getting tacky.
· If you need to clean off your hands stick them in the bucket as soon as possible and wipe off. If they become sticky Acetone on a rag will remove the GG.
· When you get down to last few inches of GG in the bucket the Speed Loader will no longer suck up the remainder. You need to either scrape the remains into a fresh bucket or using a tool scrape and fling it directly onto the next drywall sheet. If you leave the last few inches and dispose, you will be wasting about $25 of material per bucket. I find that having some disposable exam gloves are useful when it comes time to scrape the bucket. A scrap piece of drywall about 5x10 inches makes a great scraping tool, then toss in the trash.
· When it is break time, draw a load of the soapy water up into the speed loader and let sit in the bucket of water.
· At the end of the day you can either completely clean and lubricate the gun (30-60 minutes) or simply rinse out with a few loads of the soapy water, draw up a full load of water and let sit in the bucket of water. If several days will pass before you use the gun again flush it daily with soapy water.
· Start the next day with a fresh bucket of warm soapy water.

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post #118 of 124 Old 12-05-2019, 05:18 AM - Thread Starter
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Pre-ordered subs have arrived! Managed to get them into the garage where they will stay until we move into the new house. Total shipment weight was 515lbs.

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post #119 of 124 Old 12-05-2019, 05:59 AM
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Pre-ordered subs have arrived! Managed to get them into the garage where they will stay until we move into the new house. Total shipment weight was 515lbs.

Excellent!! Two more and you will be good to go!!!
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post #120 of 124 Old 12-05-2019, 03:13 PM
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When will your house be done?

Klipsch KPS-400’s FR/FL with built in 15” 300 watt side firing subs, RC-7 Center, RS-3 Surrounds.
Integra DHC-60.5, 5- Marantz MA700 Mono Blocks, Pioneer DV-F727 301 Disk DVD CD Changer, Pioneer DVL-909 Laserdisc/DVD/CD Player, Sony PS3.
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