Flexible Conduit - 2 questions - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 14 Old 12-12-2019, 01:55 AM - Thread Starter
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Flexible Conduit - 2 questions

In regards to flexible conduit (non metal, plastic type):

1. Any suggestions on how to cleanly and securely terminate this conduit in the wall ? I am running it all over our new home build from rack to various TV and theater room locations. Do they make any type of wall plate so it is secured , and doesn’t slip back into the wall cavity behind the drywall ?

2. Will there be potential electromagnetic interference issues if a single flexible conduit is packed (fairly tightly) with 15 speaker wires going to the home theater (from the AV rack amplifier)? They are good quality 14/4 speaker wires, but this potential issue still concerns me.
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post #2 of 14 Old 12-12-2019, 06:22 AM
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they also make a solid blue box with similar pop outs to secure conduit.


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post #3 of 14 Old 12-12-2019, 06:38 AM
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There are a number of pipe clamps of that diameter you may be able to use, or cable ties. I prefer the clamps since nylon cable ties get brittle over time.
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post #4 of 14 Old 12-12-2019, 08:41 AM
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Regarding question 3, leave conduit empty (except for perhaps pull string) in a new build. Use cl2 or cl3 (riser if necessary to cross a plenum) in wall rated wire and run it bare through framing. The conduit is for future use. Don't use it all up now when you have easy access to just run wire through framing!

Termination depends on how and when you expect to use the conduit. If you expect to use it soon, or if you don't ever want to have to do anything to access it, the low voltage box Big showed is ideal. If it's there for ”maybe if needed" future use you could just secure with conduit clamp and leave it behind finished drywall. Easy to cut a hole and pop in a LV box later, though you want be able to integrate the conduit and box as nicely. This does require that you measure and document well where all conduit ends are.
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post #5 of 14 Old 12-12-2019, 12:45 PM
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Some caveats will also present themselves after you install your conduit and then you start pulling wire, at which point it is already in the wall and difficult to remedy.

#1 ) DO NOT fill your conduit past 80% full. It will inevitably prevent you from pulling wire at all.

#2 ) Keep your bends to a minimum. Typically more than 3 90 degree bends will prevent you from pulling wire at all unless it is a small wire in a large conduit.

#3 ) Flex normally compounds the issues above because of the interior of the pipe having ribs, with the Sealtite/LiquidTite being the easiest to use because of the smoother interior but very expensive as well as the connectors.

#4 ) secure your conduit as best you can for the entire run so it can't move when pulling, when pulling lots of speaker wire, the PVC jacket typically does not lend itself to being pulled through a conduit easily like standard THHN wire that is used by electricians in conduit because of it's slick outside coating.

I hope these tips help you.
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post #6 of 14 Old 12-12-2019, 03:33 PM
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Usually you don't fill conduit more than 40%.. I know low voltage doesn't apply to NEC, but for ease of pull I wouldn't go past 40..

IMO just run the in wall rated wires without conduit with a spare set or two at each location for future use.. It isn't like speaker wires go bad all of a sudden.. Then you run 2 Cat6e cables to each location and maybe a 3ghz coax..

Would save you a ton of money and lots and lots of future headaches with that crap smurf tube..
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post #7 of 14 Old 12-12-2019, 04:48 PM
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Conduit is for wire you don't know now that you will need or want in the future. Fiber optic? New higher spec cat cable? Dedicated video cable? Something else? Who knows.

I ran gray Carlon solid PVC conduit with max of 2 90 deg bends in any one segment. Cheaper than flex Smurf, smoother walls, fewer bends, but more of a pain to install.
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post #8 of 14 Old 12-13-2019, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigus View Post
I ran gray Carlon solid PVC conduit with max of 2 90 deg bends in any one segment. Cheaper than flex Smurf, smoother walls, fewer bends, but more of a pain to install.
Using standard conduit would be key for successful future pulls..
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post #9 of 14 Old 12-13-2019, 07:45 PM
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Right. That is standard conduit.
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post #10 of 14 Old 12-13-2019, 08:54 PM
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All my flex conduit was pre-loaded with 1/16 in. x 500 ft. Galvanized Steel Aircraft Cable you can buy at Home Depot. I found this better than nylon "mule tape", which one time broke. You can pull tough runs with this cale. You can also buy wire pulling lubricant from electrical supply store. I used all 1" flex plastic cable in case I want to pull fiber HDMI because of the larger connector at the ends. Like others said, use the conduit for what you don't know will be pulled in the future. Know that CAT7 and CAT8 cables, good to 40Gbs, have a much larger diameter and don't bend as easy as smaller CAT cables. Use wide radius turns. I also ran flex metal conduit to electrical boxes where my rack is, just in case I need additional conductors for electric supply, like isolated grounds, ...
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post #11 of 14 Old 12-13-2019, 09:28 PM
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The blue smurf tube unless very well secured is a nightmare to pull through. Gray PVC is a much better option. Aldo if you heat the gray stuff you can make bends ain straight pipes. You just need to be careful so you don't kink or squish it as it gets very limp when heated to the right temp.
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post #12 of 14 Old 12-15-2019, 01:19 PM
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Flex tube is a nightmare especially for HDMI Cables, even the 1" stuff usually binds pretty bad unless it is really well secured
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post #13 of 14 Old 12-15-2019, 10:18 PM
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Whatever you do, put some sort of strong pull string in it!

I buried two runs of sealtite to my shop when I was running larger power cable to it. Getting fishtape through it was a nightmare.
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post #14 of 14 Old 12-16-2019, 06:14 AM
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skip the fish tape. I secure a light shopping bag to the end of nylon masons line and suck through the conduit with a shop vac. Then I use the masons line to pull in a thicker nylon cord to pull in the cables. If you are pulling in several cables in a single conduit pull them all at once. You can stagger the cable ends so you don't have a big mass at the end. Trying to do them one at a time can be a nightmare as they bind on each other. If I have to add a new cable I pull everything out and start over.
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