HELP--flooding in Home Theater - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 27 Old 05-19-2020, 08:20 AM - Thread Starter
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HELP--flooding in Home Theater

Just woke up to more heavy rain and found basement/theater with water coming in from storm drains and apparently under the foundation.

Home theater is double drywall with acoustic batting and GOM fabric. Several spots on carpet definitely wet with water under them....and have already noticed 3 of the walls have water wicking up 6-8 inches onto the fabric.

Headed out to buy some industrial fans and dehumidifiers......insurance says we have $6K total coverage. Several areas in other parts of the basement also are wet from under the carpet.

Any suggestions, etc welcomed!!

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post #2 of 27 Old 05-19-2020, 10:48 AM
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I'm sorry to hear of your bad luck. I haven't had storm water in my basement but did have a water heater leak out a few years ago and can tell you what was done then. The damage it caused was >5X what your insurance says they will cover.

The theater is now just a very small part of your problems. Does anyone in the home have any respiratory issues or sensitivities? Mold and mildew are the most pressing issue at this point.

Before buying industrial drying equipment, check with local rental houses. You can rent much larger equipment for a week or more for less than you can buy it for, and hopefully you won't need it again. I would act quickly, if flooding is widespread in your area, there will be many calls for rental equipment.

Once you get the water removed, take out any furniture, cabinets, etc that have had water on them. If they are made of MDF go ahead and dispose of them, it's a great building material, but absolutely will not tolerate water. Anything that can possibly be dried and saved, set them somewhere to dry. The GOM fabric is synthetic, I think made from recycled soda bottles. Once you can work in the area, find the high water mark and chalk line a horizontal line about 12-18 inches higher than that mark all around the room. use a utility knife and straight edge if you like and score a horizontal line all around the room. This will make repairs easier if repairs are even possible. Start tearing the drywall off from the floor level up to the score line all the way to the studs. If you have fiberglass insulation especially fiberglass with paper backing, rip it out up to the score line. If it's rockwool, you might be able to salvage it, rockwool is much more tolerant of water than fiberglass or cellulose. Go ahead and pitch the carpet and pad if it has one. Most carpet is synthetic, but they do use organic materials like jute in the backing, carpet pad will just act like a big sponge and probably never dry out.

At this point start with the fans and dehumidifiers for several days or maybe even weeks. While the area is drying start looking into why and where the storm water backed into your basement to start with. There are backflow preventers on the market that act like a check valve to prevent this. It probably won't be cheap to get one installed if your slab has to be cut into to install it, but it will be much cheaper than doing this clean up again. It's also a good time to check drainage around your house and see if you can do anything there to help prevent another occurrence like extending gutter downspouts, grading, or additional drainage systems.

The biggest mistake most people make is trying to rebuild too soon. You will need a moisture meter and accurate humidity meter. Inspect the open wall sections very carefully. If it's metal studs, wonderful. If they are wood, any wood that touches concrete or masonry should be treated lumber. Mind you that this open area is just a starting point, if you see signs of mold or dampness you are going to have to keep going higher, maybe all the way to the ceiling. The last thing you want to do is enclose actively growing mold. You should run the fans and dehumidifier(s) until the following: dimensional lumber has about 20% moisture content from the lumber yard so that's an acceptable level for lumber, drywall should be very close to 0%, maybe 5% is OK, hardwoods should be <10%, Overall room humidity should be at or less than 55%. The recipe for mold is darkness, low or no air movement, humidity >55%, and an organic food source. Some of the newer drywall has a paperless finish, but most use paper. Take moisture and humidity measurements at a minimum of once a day and document them for a report you make for yourself for purposes I'll explain later.

If you are able to get it dried properly, a final cleaning and disinfecting with some kind of bleach will be the next step. The oxygenated bleaches are supposedly best on molds. Give the moisture you introduced during cleaning a few days to dry out.

I don't know anything about real estate laws in your state/area, but if you ever sell the property you will likely have to disclose the flooding. Make plenty of pics and document all mitigation steps taken including moisture and humidity levels before and after. If you do this DIY, it might be a good idea to have a pro come out and give an opinion on if it's completely mitigated before rebuilding. Make sure and keep a copy of their report for reasons I listed above. Another good idea would be run an test for molds. You can buy the kits at most of the big box stores and you have to send it to a lab for results, you end up paying twice, don't be fooled by the original sales price. If the report comes back with a high level of molds, you need to keep tearing away at the walls to find the source. If you do ever sell, you will want to show documented evidence that you properly mitigated the damage and took steps to prevent it happening again.

I wish you the best, I know how you feel.
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post #3 of 27 Old 05-19-2020, 06:18 PM
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News you don't want to hear. I wouldn't be in a hurry to repair the damage other than the demo and managing any mold issues. You need to determine why it flooded, solve that problem and then wait for a another major storm for conformation that the solution worked. Rebuilding without confirmation could be an expensive mistake.
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post #4 of 27 Old 05-19-2020, 06:27 PM
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Completely agree with all of this. Our house had major flooding in our house, thankfully before we closed on it. The damage was massive and the cost was in the tens of thousands by the time it was said and done. Rental of commercial dehumidifiers is recommended, they are extremely expensive. If you can afford it I would hire a company who specializes in this. I know the previous owners of this house hired one. Once they had everything dried up they ended up having to remove the bottom half of the drywall all around, remove all of the vapor barrier and insulation, and of course carpet and laminate flooring.

As rightly suggested, finding the root cause of the flooding is critical, otherwise it will eventually happen again. In our case we made it a requirement for the owners to upgrade the HP of the sump pump from 1/4 hp to 1/2 hp, add a second 1/2 hp pump, and add a battery backup on top of that. Definitely overkill but we won't be flooding out any time soon.
I'm afraid that $6k the insurance is offering isn't going to be nearly enough to pay for what is going to be needed. Don't skimp out on moisture removal. If any significant moisture is trapped in a wall you could be in for a world of hurt with mold.
Sorry to hear of your troubles, I hope it goes smoothly for you in the cleanup/repair efforts.
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post #5 of 27 Old 05-20-2020, 06:58 AM
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Gary, Jeff and Bourbon (well done by the way) have given you solid advice that matches with my experience. Unlike Gary, we closed on the house the month prior to massive rains in KC...so we were the ones stuck with all the bills and work.

I'd like to emphasize the overall theme of what everyone has said, take care of drying out everything, remove those items that can't or shouldn't be salvaged and find the source of the water issues. We are just passed the first anniversary of our purchase. Fortunately, we hadn't moved in yet. So the damage was limited to drywall, baseboards and clean up. Our issues were not related to foundation problems but were "water" issues. KC had experience historic water levels after days/weeks of rain. The saturation levels around our foundation had built up and it found it's way into the basement.

Here's a list of what we did:

1) Increased the size of the sump pump (and quality) w/ a back up battery
2) The sump pump was not plumbed beyond the foundation...idiots...so we did what should have been done and ran a pipe out 15 ft from the house
3) Increased the size of our guttering to 6 inches
4) Added gutter covering (not screen or mesh). We had two gutters clogged (hadn't moved in yet) and water flowing over. Cleaned those gutters when I found out...made those changes
5) Added french drains and piping 10-15 fit from the house
6) Added landscaping around the house (foundation), with river rock and pond liner underneath
7) The most important part of the yard was regrading. Now you see water flowing away from the house to a "trench" out to the SE corner.
8) Added trenching along the foundation and intake piping along the problem area of the house, which leads to the sump pump. Couple other items too. We used Thrasher
9) A large (I call it industrial) dehumidifier to the basement. It's a stand alone unit.


The real water issues were on the "non-home theater side". Of course, we are still concerned for the overall basement and "water". Relative to the HT. I waited till just a month (or so ago) to start working on the HT. The first version will be DIY. Down the road, our plan is to do a version of the originally planned build out. In this version, I had to make a decision not to use carpet or vinyl planking etc etc. I used black epoxy coat to the concrete floor and area rugs. We also used PVC baseboards. I felt this was the best compromise in case of water issues down the road. Believe me, when we have heavy rains or I hear the sump pump working....I go down and check. I have post traumatic water syndrome.

I included a picture (not done yet- the prints were up till the acoustic panels came in etc etc) showing the flooring, so you get the idea.
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post #6 of 27 Old 05-20-2020, 07:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies.

Yes--we got historic rainfalls over the last 3 days. Roads, parking lots, creeks, etc close by all flooded. Pretty sure it was a combination of saturation levels, gutters not expelling water far enough from house and improper grading in one location.

Never really saw water poring in anywhere, just wet carpet along one wall in the theater, and two walls in the basement outside the theater (by the walk out where the storm drain was backed up). No sump pump in the home....as it sits on top of a hill!

We have expelled as much as we can with shop vac and carpet cleaner. 2 industrial dehumidifiers are running and multiple fans. The equipment room for the theater room got water in it too...but there is no padding under that...carpet (was leftover from theater) was just glued to the concrete (we really didn't intend on finishing).

Contractor coming over this afternoon to look at the carpet areas that had water. Thinks they may be able to pull the carpet back, remote any wet padding and replace while keeping the carpet.

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post #7 of 27 Old 05-20-2020, 08:26 AM
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Glad to hear you are off to a good start on a dreaded process. The fans are a good combination with the dehumidifiers. The fans basically only help vaporize the water, it's still there just in a vapor state adding humidity to the air. The dehumidifiers take over the heavy lifting then by turning it back to a liquid form that you dump outside or down the drain.

The storm drain you said was outside? Over time they tend to fill up with leaves and debris and are rarely if ever checked. Might be a good idea to rent or buy a sewer snake and see if you can clean it out. If you have a pressure washer there are some really cool water jet attachments that you can attach that will literally blow through drain obstructions. I bought one from Northern Tool and had just unclogged some gutter downspouts before we got all of the rain the past couple of days. The one I bought shoots a solid jet forward, and has some jets that blow backward at a 45 degree angle. The front one blows a path and the others clean the inside of the pipe or gutter. You do need to flush thoroughly with a water hose afterward.

I've never been a fan of carpet in a basement. There are some "luxury vinyl" which sounds like an oxymoron, on the market that actually look really good. Once down they are pretty much indestructible. I know you want some carpet in your theater for acoustics, but you can always put some throw rugs down. Carpet squares are another alternative, if you should have any damage you only have to replace the damaged one(s).

This statement sounds pretty stupid until you think about it for a minute. Most water entering the basement comes from the roof. Your roof is a huge water collector and if the gutter system isn't working correctly and the downspouts aren't directed at least 3' away from the house your foundation is going to be exposed to a lot of that water. Folks living in most all of Florida and coastal areas in other states with sandy well drained soils don't have concerns, but they don't normally if ever have basements either.

Good luck, keep us posted.
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post #8 of 27 Old 05-20-2020, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
News you don't want to hear. I wouldn't be in a hurry to repair the damage other than the demo and managing any mold issues. You need to determine why it flooded, solve that problem and then wait for a another major storm for conformation that the solution worked. Rebuilding without confirmation could be an expensive mistake.
This. Was in your shoes about 6 years ago. It led to finding out we had a sinking foundation. $27k later and we had the house jacked up and stabilized and a French drain system installed around the house. Patched all cracks where the foundation separated from the slab and waited for a couple of years before starting to rebuild half of the basement to make sure there were no leaks and that the French drain worked. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
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post #9 of 27 Old 05-20-2020, 11:24 PM
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Gary, Jeff and Bourbon (well done by the way) have given you solid advice that matches with my experience. Unlike Gary, we closed on the house the month prior to massive rains in KC...so we were the ones stuck with all the bills and work.



I'd like to emphasize the overall theme of what everyone has said, take care of drying out everything, remove those items that can't or shouldn't be salvaged and find the source of the water issues. We are just passed the first anniversary of our purchase. Fortunately, we hadn't moved in yet. So the damage was limited to drywall, baseboards and clean up. Our issues were not related to foundation problems but were "water" issues. KC had experience historic water levels after days/weeks of rain. The saturation levels around our foundation had built up and it found it's way into the basement.



Here's a list of what we did:



1) Increased the size of the sump pump (and quality) w/ a back up battery

2) The sump pump was not plumbed beyond the foundation...idiots...so we did what should have been done and ran a pipe out 15 ft from the house

3) Increased the size of our guttering to 6 inches

4) Added gutter covering (not screen or mesh). We had two gutters clogged (hadn't moved in yet) and water flowing over. Cleaned those gutters when I found out...made those changes

5) Added french drains and piping 10-15 fit from the house

6) Added landscaping around the house (foundation), with river rock and pond liner underneath

7) The most important part of the yard was regrading. Now you see water flowing away from the house to a "trench" out to the SE corner.

8) Added trenching along the foundation and intake piping along the problem area of the house, which leads to the sump pump. Couple other items too. We used Thrasher

9) A large (I call it industrial) dehumidifier to the basement. It's a stand alone unit.





The real water issues were on the "non-home theater side". Of course, we are still concerned for the overall basement and "water". Relative to the HT. I waited till just a month (or so ago) to start working on the HT. The first version will be DIY. Down the road, our plan is to do a version of the originally planned build out. In this version, I had to make a decision not to use carpet or vinyl planking etc etc. I used black epoxy coat to the concrete floor and area rugs. We also used PVC baseboards. I felt this was the best compromise in case of water issues down the road. Believe me, when we have heavy rains or I hear the sump pump working....I go down and check. I have post traumatic water syndrome.



I included a picture (not done yet- the prints were up till the acoustic panels came in etc etc) showing the flooring, so you get the idea.
Can you clarify a bit on the external actions like trenching etc that you said you did? Was it an external French drain? Also what was the advantage of the different type of gutter? How much was the cost in total and what kind of contractor did you get? Prior to finishing my basement whoever I called told me about an internal French drain. No one talked about taking care of things externally which is what should be done ideally.

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post #10 of 27 Old 05-21-2020, 05:12 AM
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Can you clarify a bit on the external actions like trenching etc that you said you did? Was it an external French drain? Also what was the advantage of the different type of gutter? How much was the cost in total and what kind of contractor did you get? Prior to finishing my basement whoever I called told me about an internal French drain. No one talked about taking care of things externally which is what should be done ideally.

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Goal number 1 is to get the water away from the house. I'm not a landscaper nor a basement expert, so you are getting "my" understanding of the work that was done to our house. I guess you could say we had two types of french drains constructed for our water issues. The first was by a landscaping company, who did both the regrading of our home and the french drains. The piping was connected to the downspout of our guttering. The pipe ran underground 10-15 ft from the house. They dug a trench where they used perforated drain pipe with rock around the pipe. So you were getting water from the guttering and water from the ground along the length of the pipe. The water then is released above ground (in the backyard near the regraded trench) and in the front yard about 15 ft from the house. How your yard is graded would determine where they would send the water, could be in the yard or out to the street. I would also guess city codes would play a role if you are sending water to the city streets. I will say Kansas City is different than a suburb over the state line in Kansas (KC is right on the state line between MO and KS), so the landscaper was aware of city codes in our area.

The second french drain system was along the bottom of the foundation and empties into the sump pump. This work was done by foundation/basement company. They broke up the concrete in the basement and dug a trench. They laid perforated drain pipe along this trench which leads to the sump pump. The piping was covered by concrete (I assume rock/gravel along the trench as well). We have two areas along the piping we can open a cover to see the water (and clean out if necessary). They also installed vinyl sheets along the walls of the foundation on that side of the unfinished basement, which is connected to the draining system. We will have to have them come out an inspect every so often to see if we've had any shifting of the foundation.

As far as guttering. Guttering (again my understanding of what I learned) is determined by your roof line and where the water is being directed or sent. I may have went overboard...but I have them install 6 inch gutters (vs 4 inch) along the length of the back of the house, where the real water issues were coming from AND the front facing of a portion of the house where (clogged gutters) the gutters run parallel with the home theater room. They also added larger downspouts. I used the same company that installed the gutter covers for me.

Frankly, talking price is both personal and anecdotal. What they charge in Kansas City vs Houston vs Butte is all relative to that market place. As always getting a variety of estimates will provide a market value.

Hope this helps

Ron

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post #11 of 27 Old 05-21-2020, 05:23 AM
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Goal number 1 is to get the water away from the house. I'm not a landscaper nor a basement expert, so you are getting "my" understanding of the work that was done to our house. I guess you could say we had two types of french drains constructed for our water issues. The first was by a landscaping company, who did both the regrading of our home and the french drains. The piping was connected to the downspout of our guttering. The pipe ran underground 10-15 ft from the house. They dug a trench where they used perforated drain pipe with rock around the pipe. So you were getting water from the guttering and water from the ground along the length of the pipe. The water then is released above ground (in the backyard near the regraded trench) and in the front yard about 15 ft from the house. How your yard is graded would determine where they would send the water, could be in the yard or out to the street. I would also guess city codes would play a role if you are sending water to the city streets. I will say Kansas City is different than a suburb over the state line in Kansas (KC is right on the state line between MO and KS), so the landscaper was aware of city codes in our area.



The second french drain system was along the bottom of the foundation and empties into the sump pump. This work was done by foundation/basement company. They broke up the concrete in the basement and dug a trench. They laid perforated drain pipe along this trench which leads to the sump pump. The piping was covered by concrete (I assume rock/gravel along the trench as well). We have two areas along the piping we can open a cover to see the water (and clean out if necessary). They also installed vinyl sheets along the walls of the foundation on that side of the unfinished basement, which is connected to the draining system. We will have to have them come out an inspect every so often to see if we've had any shifting of the foundation.



As far as guttering. Guttering (again my understanding of what I learned) is determined by your roof line and where the water is being directed or sent. I may have went overboard...but I have them install 6 inch gutters (vs 4 inch) along the length of the back of the house, where the real water issues were coming from AND the front facing of a portion of the house where (clogged gutters) the gutters run parallel with the home theater room. They also added larger downspouts. I used the same company that installed the gutter covers for me.



Frankly, talking price is both personal and anecdotal. What they charge in Kansas City vs Houston vs Butte is all relative to that market place. As always getting a variety of estimates will provide a market value.



Hope this helps



Ron
Hello - thank you. I understand what you have done. Basically it looks like gutter downspouts were connected to a pipe that goes underground and dumps water 10-15 feet from the house. I have done the same. One additional step I see you have done is use perforated pipe to collect water from the ground into this pipe. In my case the pipe they installed from the gutters was a non perforated PVC pipe. In addition I see you have done an internal French drain inside your basement. I was quoted a lot of money for this and folks in this forum recommended doing an external one where they dig up outside your house to the foundation, add gravel, waterproofing etc. Its quite an expensive proposition and I don't think you have done that either. The reason for the ask for the cost was to atleast get a random order of magnitude amount that all this costs.

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post #12 of 27 Old 05-21-2020, 05:29 AM
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Hello - thank you. I understand what you have done. Basically it looks like gutter downspouts were connected to a pipe that goes underground and dumps water 10-15 feet from the house. I have done the same. One additional step I see you have done is use perforated pipe to collect water from the ground into this pipe. In my case the pipe they installed from the gutters was a non perforated PVC pipe. In addition I see you have done an internal French drain inside your basement. I was quoted a lot of money for this and folks in this forum recommended doing an external one where they dig up outside your house to the foundation, add gravel, waterproofing etc. Its quite an expensive proposition and I don't think you have done that either. The reason for the ask for the cost was to atleast get a random order of magnitude amount that all this costs.

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I'll see if I can find the name of a company that's popped up a couple of times. They are a national company that does that external trenching. There is a member who has one of the best HT's on AVS and it's located in his basement. He's used this company on a couple of different houses in Michigan and has had zero water issues. I'll do some digging and see if I can find the name

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post #13 of 27 Old 05-21-2020, 06:28 AM
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Thanks for the replies.

Yes--we got historic rainfalls over the last 3 days. Roads, parking lots, creeks, etc close by all flooded. Pretty sure it was a combination of saturation levels, gutters not expelling water far enough from house and improper grading in one location.

Never really saw water poring in anywhere, just wet carpet along one wall in the theater, and two walls in the basement outside the theater (by the walk out where the storm drain was backed up). No sump pump in the home....as it sits on top of a hill!

We have expelled as much as we can with shop vac and carpet cleaner. 2 industrial dehumidifiers are running and multiple fans. The equipment room for the theater room got water in it too...but there is no padding under that...carpet (was leftover from theater) was just glued to the concrete (we really didn't intend on finishing).

Contractor coming over this afternoon to look at the carpet areas that had water. Thinks they may be able to pull the carpet back, remote any wet padding and replace while keeping the carpet.
As I am from Michigan, I know this issue in previous homes. Likely, you had concrete block walls.

So sorry to hear this. It's a real drag.

But I'll pass along what I did to solve it. I used B-Dry (www.bdry.com) to waterproof my basement. I used them in two of my previous houses and it solved water seepage, leaks, etc (like you experienced) 100%. I highly recommend them if you want a permanent solution. A tried and true system. They do an internal drain tile around the periphery or section of the basement. Eliminated all water in both homes.

You near Midland?

And good luck!
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Goodbye to a great audio and video genius and writer... JOHN GANNON. I enjoyed your friendship, wit and a nice long run we took around Indianapolis at CEDIA years back... and for buying my Runco 980 Ultra years back... you saved my ass! Rest in peace.
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post #14 of 27 Old 05-21-2020, 07:12 AM
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I'll see if I can find the name of a company that's popped up a couple of times. They are a national company that does that external trenching. There is a member who has one of the best HT's on AVS and it's located in his basement. He's used this company on a couple of different houses in Michigan and has had zero water issues. I'll do some digging and see if I can find the name
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As I am from Michigan, I know this issue in previous homes. Likely, you had concrete block walls.

So sorry to hear this. It's a real drag.

But I'll pass along what I did to solve it. I used B-Dry (www.bdry.com) to waterproof my basement. I used them in two of my previous houses and it solved water seepage, leaks, etc (like you experienced) 100%. I highly recommend them if you want a permanent solution. A tried and true system. They do an internal drain tile around the periphery or section of the basement. Eliminated all water in both homes.

You near Midland?

And good luck!
Jeff, you were the exact person I was thinking of ...but couldn't remember the name of the company you recommended. Thanks, you saved me a trip with old posts.


Ron


For those that haven't seen Jeff's HT build thread, it's amazing. Both in aesthetic and performance (the equipment list he's put together is drool worthy):

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/86-ul...ends-here.html

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Jeff, you were the exact person I was thinking of ...but couldn't remember the name of the company you recommended. Thanks, you saved me a trip with old posts.


Ron


For those that haven't seen Jeff's HT build thread, it's amazing. Both in aesthetic and performance (the equipment list he's put together is drool worthy):

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/86-ul...ends-here.html
Hey Ron

Yes. Not a grata club to be a part of. But there are fixes as I know you’ve accomplished.

Thanks for the kind words on my theater. Much appreciated!

Goodbye to a great audio and video genius and writer... JOHN GANNON. I enjoyed your friendship, wit and a nice long run we took around Indianapolis at CEDIA years back... and for buying my Runco 980 Ultra years back... you saved my ass! Rest in peace.
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post #16 of 27 Old 05-22-2020, 04:58 AM
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I don't have any personal experience with B-Dry but a friend of mine who was a home builder before retiring always put B-Dry systems in any house he built with a basement. According to him they were good on their warranty and a reputable company.

With that being said, think about the source of your leak. The storm water has to penetrate the house before the B-Dry system could expel it, in your case it would be a secondary system. If the water came from an interior plumbing issue, it would be a primary system. The point I'm trying to make is that B-Dry would be a good insurance policy, but you need to closely examine the exterior to find the source of the leak. I think many of the usual suspects have been previously listed and would be a good place to start looking. The goal is to prevent storm water from penetrating to begin with.

Speaking of insurance, I believe once you have some time available you might want to examine your policy and/or carrier. I'm afraid the figure they quoted you won't begin to cover your damages.
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Quick update.

It was a partially clogged walkout basement drain that was the culprit. Roto rooter is cleaning out. Two downspouts also need to be re-directed to flow away from the house more. Areas of wet carpet pulled up and padding removed in the home theater. Moisture tests on the studs and drywall are good after a week of heavy drying out.

Carpet and padding had to be removed from the other part of the basement. Not sure we want to put carpet down there again. Any recommendations of a flooring that won't be shot if water ever gets down there again?

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Quick update.



It was a partially clogged walkout basement drain that was the culprit. Roto rooter is cleaning out. Two downspouts also need to be re-directed to flow away from the house more. Areas of wet carpet pulled up and padding removed in the home theater. Moisture tests on the studs and drywall are good after a week of heavy drying out.



Carpet and padding had to be removed from the other part of the basement. Not sure we want to put carpet down there again. Any recommendations of a flooring that won't be shot if water ever gets down there again?
Hi - how did you diagnose the exact issue? Did a plumber come out and tell you? Also luxury vinyl plank is a good alternative for flooring which is water resistant. You could also think about a subfloor under the vinyl plank like the following

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DRICORE-...0006/202268752

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post #19 of 27 Old 05-25-2020, 06:20 AM
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Just a heads up Dricore can not sustain being submerged for a very long, even one inch of water, the panels become water logged and will warp and expand. I helped rip out a theater under construction that also had a walkout basement drain and sump pump failure. Load ready for the dump. The saga is documented in this project thread. https://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-de...t-loganed.html
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Just a heads up Dricore can not sustain being submerged for a very long, even one inch of water, the panels become water logged and will warp and expand. I helped rip out a theater under construction that also had a walkout basement drain and sump pump failure. Load ready for the dump. The saga is documented in this project thread. https://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-de...t-loganed.html
Interesting. They do a fairly good job of explaining what to do in case of a flood etc. I agree it cannot do anything while being submerged (other products will have similar restrictions). The first thing to do is to stop water coming in. After that Dricore etc. (I believe anything else as well) just act as one more layer.

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post #21 of 27 Old 05-25-2020, 07:01 AM
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If you can get the water out in a reasonable time the floor may be salvaged, If it sits for hours while you figure out a way to pump it out, the clock is ticking.
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Quick update.

It was a partially clogged walkout basement drain that was the culprit. Roto rooter is cleaning out. Two downspouts also need to be re-directed to flow away from the house more. Areas of wet carpet pulled up and padding removed in the home theater. Moisture tests on the studs and drywall are good after a week of heavy drying out.

Carpet and padding had to be removed from the other part of the basement. Not sure we want to put carpet down there again. Any recommendations of a flooring that won't be shot if water ever gets down there again?
Be careful about the drywall and studs. The drywall is where moisture will accumulate and eventually form mold. Personally, I agree with the earlier post that recommended scoring the drywall and removing 12" up from the floor. You can also coat the studs and the flooring with Zinsser Mold Killing Primer, or Zinsser Bin Primer (Shellac) to prevent any undetected moisture from creeping up on you. This is great stuff and really works well. If you have pulled up flooring down to the sub-floor, then coat the subfloor with the Mold Killing Primer. It will create a barrier and, in particular, stop any odor that could occur after time.
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post #23 of 27 Old 05-25-2020, 10:04 AM
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Glad to hear your damage was minimal, although I'm sure it didn't feel like it to you.

I too like the idea of the Zinsser sealer, make sure and use the shellac based stuff, not latex. Expect the first coat to really penetrate deeply and might need a second coat. This doesn't have to be pretty, just thorough. you'll think that wood is drinking the stuff, all you have to do is slather it on. You might want to look at a sealant for the concrete too. Basically if you can find it at the big box, you probably don't want it. I use a product called Siloxane on my exterior concrete at least every 2 years. You will likely have to go to a masonry supply house or over the web order. It's watery thin and you can brush, roll, squeegee, or even spray with a bug sprayer. It looks glossy while wet but dries with no color or sheen difference. It should last for a number of years under whatever flooring you choose.

As for flooring choices, my vote is for the vinyl planks or second choice would be tile. Obviously the tile will be much more labor intensive and for that fact more expensive unless you are a good DIYer with proper tools. The vinyl comes in many different grades and I've seen it >$10.00 per sq. ft. If you do choose the vinyl and they offer a urethane based adhesive use it. The glue will cost as much or more than the flooring, but highly waterproof. Not a big fan of carpet in any basement, but if you do go that route, I recommend carpet squares. Buy some extra and store in a dry place and if one becomes stained or water logged, just pull it up and replace with a new one.

I realize that the tile nor the vinyl is the ideal surface for acoustics, but in a basement you have to be practical. I have engineered hardwood in mine glued down with the urethane glue. I bought a couple of heavy throw rugs for my HT and found some rug backer pads on Amazon that were made of memory foam. In many cases, the floor is the first reflection point for your speakers. I don't have measurements to back it up, but my perception is that the foam backers and rugs made a difference. I think we all believe that if we read someone's idea or come up with one of our own and spend money and time to implement it, our perception is that it sounds better. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

The floor drain you said backed up; lets do a deeper dive on that. Is that drain used for a condensate drain for the A/C or is the relief valve on the water heater piped to it? In other words does it actually have a purpose, or is it just there? There's no telling how long it took to clog up, but it will over time likely clog again. If it doesn't have a specific purpose, I would think about pouring it full of hydraulic cement from the inside.

Again I want to emphasize saving all of the documentation you have plus pictures either digital or hard copy. Either you or your heirs will likely sell that house sometime down the road and it will be extremely valuable then.

For my last point I want to recommend a whole house dehumidifier. They are ducted into your HVAC system and once installed only require some infrequent maintenance like changing the filter, and cleaning out the condensate removal system. There are numerous reasons for keeping the indoor humidity <55% both from the health standpoint as well as comfort. We've found that keeping indoor humidity at 45% we can keep the A/C turned up a couple of degrees and still be very comfortable. These are much more efficient at removing humidity than your A/C and will actually make the A/C more efficient by removing or greatly reducing the latent load.
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post #24 of 27 Old Yesterday, 03:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Roto Rooter just left.

It appears the walkout basement (outdoor) drain goes into the home drain tile system. There is no sump pump on the house. It's only about a 3 foot run from the drain to the base of the house. He blew that out with a rubber bladder. He let water run for about an hour into it..and nothing backed up...it all drained. I can see water about 4 inches down into the drain. He was certain it was functioning as expected now. Does that sound right?

We looked for anyhwere in the lawn that it may drain system may drain to, but couldn't find. There are no exposed drains, etc on the street except for the corner of the cul-de-sac...so couldn't find it there either.

Any other way to test the drain tile system?

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Roto Rooter just left.

It appears the walkout basement (outdoor) drain goes into the home drain tile system. There is no sump pump on the house. It's only about a 3 foot run from the drain to the base of the house. He blew that out with a rubber bladder. He let water run for about an hour into it..and nothing backed up...it all drained. I can see water about 4 inches down into the drain. He was certain it was functioning as expected now. Does that sound right?

We looked for anyhwere in the lawn that it may drain system may drain to, but couldn't find. There are no exposed drains, etc on the street except for the corner of the cul-de-sac...so couldn't find it there either.

Any other way to test the drain tile system?
Call the $99 drain camera guy and figure this out! Get it scoped so you know exactly where this goes. He can track it outside the house and find where it goes. It will be well worth knowing exactly where the drain goes!!!
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post #26 of 27 Old Yesterday, 05:57 PM
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when it gets dry this summer and your grass turns brown run a hose in the drain for a couple of days and look for green grass. It is possible that the drain just goes to a trench with perforated pipe that is partially filled with rock below ground. That system design will reach capacity at some point.
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post #27 of 27 Old Yesterday, 07:51 PM
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Roto Rooter just left.
. . . .
Any other way to test the drain tile system?
We experienced a leak last week too, sadly for the first time ever, as our basement has always been bone dry. Not in home theater, but along an 8' tall foundation wall in storage room. I'm not up on the current best testing methods, but of course there's lots and lots to read in google or bing searches, for example: openhearth .us / drain-tile-testing
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