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post #1 of 22 Old 10-19-2019, 08:51 PM - Thread Starter
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Screen Recommendations Needed

I'm trying to help a friend put together a projector setup in a less than ideal room.

It's for a basement that's 12' x 14'. The room will be completely light controlled, but he does not want to paint the walls/ceiling dark. I may be able to convince him to do a light gray, but that's about it.

On the 12' wall he has a wall unit that will house his speakers and a TV. He'd like to get a motorized screen to come down in front of the wall unit. The TV will be for everyday normal viewing, with the projector for occasional movies, sports and concert streaming. He's still debating between going with the BenQ HT3550 and doing a 110-120" screen or the Epson 5050UB and doing a 100" screen. The wall unit is 1.5' deep and there will be a 3' deep couch on the opposite wall. So given the 14' length, his throw distance and eyes to screen distance will both be ~10'.

The speakers will be behind the screen so it'll need to be acoustically transparent.

Given his refusal to paint, would you also recommend an ambient light rejecting screen? If so, does a tab-tensioned, motorized, ALR, AT screen exist that would work well for this arrangement? Will he be better off without an ALR screen due to the short throw distance and risk of hot spotting?

Any input would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
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post #2 of 22 Old 10-20-2019, 06:42 AM
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Wall reflections will have a seriously detrimental effect on contrast and black levels.
You can show him this example:
https://www.facebook.com/projectiond...2721894385217/
And a detailed explanation:
http://projectiondream.com/en/movie-...-measurements/

As in the example above, curtains can be used to combat the unwanted reflections. Or staple black velvet to walls or frames/wood pannels.

If the room will be modified a white screen will do best.
This configuration will allow the 5050UB's to display black details without getting washed out. However, if the room will stay the way that it is (or be painted in a light grey) the 5050UB's black levels will be wasted. The Epson HC4010 is the downgraded version of the 5050UB with poorer blacks, and a 10GB HDMI chip as opposed to 18GB on the 5050 (and the HT3550).

The main difference between the HT3550 and 5050UB is the black level the Epson is capable of producing (in a properly blacked out room).

When calculating distances make sure to take into account the depth of the projector and the space behind it (for wires/power cable) .

Optimal distance to screen is subjective, but 100", even 120" from 10' with a 4K display is on the far side.
What is sometimes suggested is the projector to be used on a wall for few weeks before making a decision on the screen size.
Although both claim to be 4K, the Epson has ~4 million pixels, and the Benq ~8 million pixels.

XY screens makes a retractable ALR tensioned AT screen, but an ALR screen will very likely produce a hotspot at those throw ranges. It's also expensive.
A negative gain grey/white screen would be an option for the Epson since it has the lumens to power it, (while doable) it would be less ideal for the Benq.

Another kind of setup would be one with a UST projector if there is room to place the projector in front of the TV, where the screen would drop down. UST ALR screens exist that do not exhibit any hotspot.
This setup is significantly more expensive.

LE: The Optoma UHD51A has a more lumens and a similar throw range as the HT3550. It also has a RGBRGB color wheel just like the Benq. No iris though. The Benq probably has a better HDR tone mapping feature. The Optoma could power a negative gain screen.
Lumen measurements:
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Opt...51A-review.htm
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Ben...,-Measurements

https://www.projectorcentral.com/Opt...ulator-pro.htm
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Ben...ulator-pro.htm

Last edited by noob00224; 10-20-2019 at 07:01 AM.
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post #3 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 08:23 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noob00224 View Post
Wall reflections will have a seriously detrimental effect on contrast and black levels.
You can show him this example:
https://www.facebook.com/projectiond...2721894385217/
And a detailed explanation:
http://projectiondream.com/en/movie-...-measurements/

As in the example above, curtains can be used to combat the unwanted reflections. Or staple black velvet to walls or frames/wood pannels.

If the room will be modified a white screen will do best.
This configuration will allow the 5050UB's to display black details without getting washed out. However, if the room will stay the way that it is (or be painted in a light grey) the 5050UB's black levels will be wasted. The Epson HC4010 is the downgraded version of the 5050UB with poorer blacks, and a 10GB HDMI chip as opposed to 18GB on the 5050 (and the HT3550).

The main difference between the HT3550 and 5050UB is the black level the Epson is capable of producing (in a properly blacked out room).

When calculating distances make sure to take into account the depth of the projector and the space behind it (for wires/power cable) .

Optimal distance to screen is subjective, but 100", even 120" from 10' with a 4K display is on the far side.
What is sometimes suggested is the projector to be used on a wall for few weeks before making a decision on the screen size.
Although both claim to be 4K, the Epson has ~4 million pixels, and the Benq ~8 million pixels.

XY screens makes a retractable ALR tensioned AT screen, but an ALR screen will very likely produce a hotspot at those throw ranges. It's also expensive.
A negative gain grey/white screen would be an option for the Epson since it has the lumens to power it, (while doable) it would be less ideal for the Benq.

Another kind of setup would be one with a UST projector if there is room to place the projector in front of the TV, where the screen would drop down. UST ALR screens exist that do not exhibit any hotspot.
This setup is significantly more expensive.

LE: The Optoma UHD51A has a more lumens and a similar throw range as the HT3550. It also has a RGBRGB color wheel just like the Benq. No iris though. The Benq probably has a better HDR tone mapping feature. The Optoma could power a negative gain screen.
Lumen measurements:
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Opt...51A-review.htm
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Ben...,-Measurements

https://www.projectorcentral.com/Opt...ulator-pro.htm
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Ben...ulator-pro.htm

These are the answers I expected to hear. I'll definitely share that video with him, but it's already a dark basement and I don't think the wife is gonna agree to painting it. A velvet curtain like that would be nice, but how do they manage to keep the ceiling portion from sagging?

Are you saying that even a 120" screen is small from a 10' viewing distance? I know it's personal preference, so wondering what your preferred size would be from that distance.

There's no room for a UST in front of the screen unless it would be ceiling mounted, and he doesn't want that.

So your opinion is that spending more for the Epson 5050 is a waste unless the room is properly treated, right?

How much of an impact does a negative gain screen have on reducing light reflection?
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post #4 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 08:58 AM
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Reality is that a wide variety of personal preferences are expressed on AVS Forum every single day. While there's nothing wrong with considering tables of averages and the opinions of others, just always be aware that they may or may not fit you. When it comes to screen size and viewing distance it's always best to experiment wherever possible and let your own eyes be the judge. For example, a 120" screen viewed from 10' would be considered in the average range with some preferring bigger and some smaller. And while a room that doesn't have dark walls, ceiling and floor may not be fully optimized for enjoying the best black levels there is still some value in having a projector that produces more convincing blacks. Room cross reflections can reduce a black level advantage without totally eliminating it.
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post #5 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 09:08 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
Reality is that a wide variety of personal preferences are expressed on AVS Forum every single day. While there's nothing wrong with considering tables of averages and the opinions of others, just always be aware that they may or may not fit you. When it comes to screen size and viewing distance it's always best to experiment wherever possible and let your own eyes be the judge. For example, a 120" screen viewed from 10' would be considered in the average range with some preferring bigger and some smaller. And while a room that doesn't have dark walls, ceiling and floor may not be fully optimized for enjoying the best black levels there is still some value in having a projector that produces more convincing blacks. Room cross reflections can reduce a black level advantage without totally eliminating it.
Thanks Dave. I appreciate you chiming in again (you did in my other thread).

I'm planning to bring my BenQ HT1075 over to his house before he buys anything to help him get a sense of size and what he likes best.

If he wants 110" or 120" I think it's pretty much decided that it'll be the BenQ. But if he prefers 100" then I'm not sure which way he'll go.

He just emailed me saying that this is the screen he's currently thinking of buying:
https://elitescreens.com/front/front...ail/product/60

My personal experience with screens is minimal, but from all my time reading AVS I've seen a lot of negative comments regarding Elite. Also, it says in the description "Not compatible with Ultra/Short-throw Projectors." Would the BenQ fall in the ST category in these regards?

It's 1.0 gain and not ALR. I'm worried about hot spotting from his throw distance (10 - 10.5'). If he's not gonna treat the room, is he better off with a brighter projector like an Epson and a negative gain screen? Does that help a little bit? Is there some other alternative?

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post #6 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 09:28 AM
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Retractable acoustically transparent screens are not frequently discussed on this forum so it may be difficult getting input on the performance of that specific screen. There are pros and cons to every type of screen as with all types of projectors, so when you're wide open to all the different options it takes a lot of research to weigh the pros and cons of each and see what best fits the user's preferences. It complicates things when one person is posting on this forum asking for advice on behalf of someone else who will actually be using the setup. I recall one such discussion on this forum some years back going on for many pages and covering a lot of territory.
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post #7 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 09:53 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
Retractable acoustically transparent screens are not frequently discussed on this forum so it may be difficult getting input on the performance of that specific screen. There are pros and cons to every type of screen as with all types of projectors, so when you're wide open to all the different options it takes a lot of research to weigh the pros and cons of each and see what best fits the user's preferences. It complicates things when one person is posting on this forum asking for advice on behalf of someone else who will actually be using the setup. I recall one such discussion on this forum some years back going on for many pages and covering a lot of territory.
I hear ya. He's a complete novice when it comes to all of this and doesn't really have preferences. We'll figure out the screen size. Other than that I know he'll be happy with any setup we decide on, but I'd just like to make the best informed purchases possible.
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post #8 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by noob00224 View Post
Wall reflections will have a seriously detrimental effect on contrast and black levels.
You can show him this example:
https://www.facebook.com/projectiond...2721894385217/
This video is fantastic. I need something like this in my room.
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post #9 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by WiscoNYC View Post
... If he wants 110" or 120" I think it's pretty much decided that it'll be the BenQ. But if he prefers 100" then I'm not sure which way he'll go. ...
Addressing this specific question, I wouldn't try too hard to push someone into a bigger screen than they think they'd be comfortable with. But experience on this forum has shown more of a tendency for those who are new to video projection to go too small rather than too big on their first screen. If they initially think 100" is just right and 110" might be slightly too big, there's a good chance after a few weeks of adapting to the home big screen experience they'll wish they had gone with the bigger screen. There really isn't a huge difference between 100" and 110" screens viewed from 10'. So if eliminating the 100" screen and going 110" or 120" locks in a specific projector like the BenQ, that may be a good thing as it at least removes one of the variables and just leaves the type of screen to be determined.
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post #10 of 22 Old 10-21-2019, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by WiscoNYC View Post
These are the answers I expected to hear. I'll definitely share that video with him, but it's already a dark basement and I don't think the wife is gonna agree to painting it. A velvet curtain like that would be nice, but how do they manage to keep the ceiling portion from sagging?

Are you saying that even a 120" screen is small from a 10' viewing distance? I know it's personal preference, so wondering what your preferred size would be from that distance.

There's no room for a UST in front of the screen unless it would be ceiling mounted, and he doesn't want that.

So your opinion is that spending more for the Epson 5050 is a waste unless the room is properly treated, right?

How much of an impact does a negative gain screen have on reducing light reflection?
The HT1070 can be used to generally determine the size of the screen, but keep in mind that the HT1070 is 1080p, and for higher resolutions a closer seating position would be required in order to resolve the detail that 4K brings.
As mentioned before, both of these projectors are faux 4K, with the Epson having ~4 million pixels, and the Benq/Optoma ~8 million pixels. 1080p has ~2 million pixels.

Discussion on the 5050UB thread on the screen size issue:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/68-di...l#post58707008

The 5050UB will have slightly better black levels even in a white room, but is it worth the 1k$ extra?
In the link from the projection dream site (link) there is a detailed explanation of just how much black level is affected by wall reflections.

A negative gain screen would reflect less light in the room, including the walls, thus resulting in a less washed out image. The amount reflected back depends on the gain of the screen.

Not sure how the sagging would be eliminated, maybe intermediary bar in the middle of the ceiling?
There is thread for room treatment, maybe it can be answered there:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-di...image-223.html

Last edited by noob00224; 10-21-2019 at 10:35 PM.
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post #11 of 22 Old 10-22-2019, 09:50 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
Addressing this specific question, I wouldn't try too hard to push someone into a bigger screen than they think they'd be comfortable with. But experience on this forum has shown more of a tendency for those who are new to video projection to go too small rather than too big on their first screen. If they initially think 100" is just right and 110" might be slightly too big, there's a good chance after a few weeks of adapting to the home big screen experience they'll wish they had gone with the bigger screen. There really isn't a huge difference between 100" and 110" screens viewed from 10'. So if eliminating the 100" screen and going 110" or 120" locks in a specific projector like the BenQ, that may be a good thing as it at least removes one of the variables and just leaves the type of screen to be determined.
It seems like he's feeling set on 100" despite not seeing what 100" looks like in the room (which is still too early in the construction phase to test out). That video also helped him decide he's going to paint the room as dark as his wife will permit. I'm sure that won't be too dark, but it's a step in the right direction. He's also starting to like the idea of one of the Epsons mainly due to placement/installation flexibility that the lens shift gives him. Now one question I have is with a 1.0 gain screen, will the Epson be too bright? The calculations on projector central for the HC4010 say that it'll put out 79-86 fL displaying a 100" image from a 10' throw distance. That sounds painfully bright. A 0.8 gain screen brings it down to 63-69 fL. Are these calculations based on high lamp mode? Will eco be enough to tame the brightness? Is this where the manual iris of the 5050UB would be helpful (or very much needed)?

If he's set on the 100", is there a screen out there that meets the criteria of 0.8 gain, gray (if it'll be helpful), motorized, tab-tensioned, AT and compatible with one of these projectors (BenQ HT3550, Epson HC4010 or 5050UB)??

I see Seymour's CenterStage UF material might fit the bill. I told him to inquire with them.

If you guys have any specific screen recommendations for this setup please let me know. Thanks.
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post #12 of 22 Old 10-22-2019, 10:37 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by noob00224 View Post
The HT1070 can be used to generally determine the size of the screen, but keep in mind that the HT1070 is 1080p, and for higher resolutions a closer seating position would be required in order to resolve the detail that 4K brings.
As mentioned before, both of these projectors are faux 4K, with the Epson having ~4 million pixels, and the Benq/Optoma ~8 million pixels. 1080p has ~2 million pixels.

Discussion on the 5050UB thread on the screen size issue:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/68-di...l#post58707008

The 5050UB will have slightly better black levels even in a white room, but is it worth the 1k$ extra?
In the link from the projection dream site (link) there is a detailed explanation of just how much black level is affected by wall reflections.

A negative gain screen would reflect less light in the room, including the walls, thus resulting in a less washed out image. The amount reflected back depends on the gain of the screen.

Not sure how the sagging would be eliminated, maybe intermediary bar in the middle of the ceiling?
There is thread for room treatment, maybe it can be answered there:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-di...image-223.html

My BenQ would simply be as a size indicator, nothing more.

That's the big question with the 5050UB, how much is PQ difference worth especially in his room. Truly hard to say. The one benefit I see is the manual iris given how bright the projector is an his short throw distance.

He doesn't want to do any velvet treatment to the room, but at least he's realizing he should paint a somewhat darker shade than he was originally thinking. I'd still like to find him a negative gain motorized AT screen that seems to be ideal for his room.
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post #13 of 22 Old 10-22-2019, 10:56 AM
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Dimension of both Epson projectors: 20.5" x 17.7" x 6.7" (W x D x H).
From the 14' total distance taking out the wall unit, the space between the wall unit and the screen, the projector (17.7"), and the cables for the PJ, results in about 10' of throw distance.

For the current setup with 100" screen and 10" from lens to screen the position of the lens is very close to what was set in the reviews.
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Eps...ulator-pro.htm

PC fL estimates are not accurate. PC reviews usually measure them in the widest lens position (most zoom):
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Eps...,-Measurements
https://www.projectorcentral.com/eps...nd-Performance

The 5050UB is slightly brighter than the HC4010.

To calculate the brightness of the screen: the lumens value for the preferred mode (from the review) and divided by the square surface of the screen.
An 100" 16:9 screen has a square surface of 29.67 ft².
http://screen-size.info/
https://www.calculatorsoup.com/calcu...calculator.php
For example, the HC4010 on Cinema, Medium lamp has 723 lumens. 723/23.67=30.54 fL.
This is with a 1.0 gain screen.

The general recommendation is ~15 fL for SDR and ~30+ fL for HDR.
Lamps loose around 20% of their brightness after ~500h, after which it's a linear loss of light until the rated lamp hours, which is supposed to be 50% of it's original brightness.

Link for the Benq HT3550 if he decides to go with this one:
https://www.projectorcentral.com/Ben...,-Measurements

The HC4010 has a 10GB HDMI chip, so no 4K HDR 60Hz, 24 Hz at the most. This could be an issue if it will used for gaming.
Also for consideration is how the projector will be mounted. The Epson's are quite large, and heavy at ~25 lbs.

Not sure if the HC4010 has a manual iris. At a quick browse of both manual there does not seem to be any mention of manual iris, but one review mentioned it on the 5050UB.
Maybe the users on the units threads can answer that:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/68-di...-s-thread.html
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/68-di...hread-134.html
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post #14 of 22 Old 10-22-2019, 11:04 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noob00224 View Post
To calculate the brightness of the screen the lumens value for the preferred mode from the review and divided by the square surface of the screen.
An 100" 16:9 screen has a square surface of 29.67 ft².
http://screen-size.info/
https://www.calculatorsoup.com/calcu...calculator.php
For example, the HC4010 on Cinema, Medium lamp has 723 lumens. 723/23.67=30.54 fL.
This is with a 1.0 gain screen.

The general recommendation is ~15 fL for SDR and ~30+ fL for HDR.
Lamps loose around 20% of their brightness after ~500h, after which it's a linear loss of light until the rated lamp hours, which is supposed to be 50% of it's original brightness.
Thanks noob (although you are clearly not one). That's extremely helpful.

So the Epson seems to be the way to go. Given his lack of a perfectly treated room, the added benefit of the improved blacks the 5050 offers will most be lost. He's not a gamer so 4K/60hz doesn't matter. And based on the calculations you just posted, he wouldn't require the manual iris of the 5050 (the 4010 does not have one). The increased brightness of the Epsons over the BenQ seems like a nice feature based on those numbers.
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Originally Posted by WiscoNYC View Post
Thanks noob (although you are clearly not one). That's extremely helpful.

So the Epson seems to be the way to go. Given his lack of a perfectly treated room, the added benefit of the improved blacks the 5050 offers will most be lost. He's not a gamer so 4K/60hz doesn't matter. And based on the calculations you just posted, he wouldn't require the manual iris of the 5050 (the 4010 does not have one). The increased brightness of the Epsons over the BenQ seems like a nice feature based on those numbers.
It's unclear how much the reflections will affect in a room just with painted walls, in any shade.
He could get both and send one back .

I could be wrong, but the 5050UB might have better lenses than the HC4010.

LE: to curb the projector's brightness an ND filter can be used instead of a negative gain screen. They are cheap.

Last edited by noob00224; 10-22-2019 at 11:18 AM.
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post #16 of 22 Old 10-22-2019, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by WiscoNYC View Post
It seems like he's feeling set on 100" despite not seeing what 100" looks like in the room (which is still too early in the construction phase to test out). That video also helped him decide he's going to paint the room as dark as his wife will permit. I'm sure that won't be too dark, but it's a step in the right direction. He's also starting to like the idea of one of the Epsons mainly due to placement/installation flexibility that the lens shift gives him. Now one question I have is with a 1.0 gain screen, will the Epson be too bright? The calculations on projector central for the HC4010 say that it'll put out 79-86 fL displaying a 100" image from a 10' throw distance. That sounds painfully bright. A 0.8 gain screen brings it down to 63-69 fL. Are these calculations based on high lamp mode? Will eco be enough to tame the brightness? Is this where the manual iris of the 5050UB would be helpful (or very much needed)?

If he's set on the 100", is there a screen out there that meets the criteria of 0.8 gain, gray (if it'll be helpful), motorized, tab-tensioned, AT and compatible with one of these projectors (BenQ HT3550, Epson HC4010 or 5050UB)??

I see Seymour's CenterStage UF material might fit the bill. I told him to inquire with them.

If you guys have any specific screen recommendations for this setup please let me know. Thanks.
There's a lot to process here. First of all, no one new to front projection should ever limit themselves to a specific screen size like 100" without ever having experienced, let alone lived with one. I hope your friend isn't too difficult in terms of getting ideas in his head without being familiar with the subject.

Second, extensive lens shift is nice to have but not necessary as long as the positioning of a projector without extensive lens shift can be accommodated. It's necessary to understand all the fine details of the installation before knowing if extensive lens shift should be a priority.

Epson projectors can go very bright, especially on a smaller screen. But the projection calculator merely gives a screen brightness based on the projector's highest rated setting whereas the lowest real world setting can be less than a third as bright. So the calculator brightness numbers aren't reliable indicators.

A manual iris can be useful in evening out projector lamp brightness over the lamp's life as it dims with age. But as with extensive lens shift you pay a premium for this feature -- more than double the cost of the BenQ HT2050A. If your friend is willing to spend a lot more then it's worth considering an Epson 5000 series model with all the bells and whistles.

Are there specific reasons why your friend wants a motorized, tab tension, AT screen? It's a rare combination and limits options, which would be further limited if a grey screen is specified on top of that. A fixed screen would perform better at lower cost if it could be accommodated.

It seems like the options being considered are expanding rather than being reduced. One thing that might help narrow things down would be to get a firm budget limit from your friend. If he's only willing to spend up to a specific price point then there's no reason discussing options that would push his budget over that price point.
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post #17 of 22 Old 10-23-2019, 09:47 AM - Thread Starter
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It's unclear how much the reflections will affect in a room just with painted walls, in any shade.
He could get both and send one back .

I could be wrong, but the 5050UB might have better lenses than the HC4010.

LE: to curb the projector's brightness an ND filter can be used instead of a negative gain screen. They are cheap.
The 5050UB has some perks over the 4010, but he's decided to eliminate the 5050 at this point to put that price difference into other things. So pretty much down to the BenQ 3550 and the Epson 4010.

I'll look into the ND filter (if it's even necessary). Thanks.
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post #18 of 22 Old 10-23-2019, 09:55 AM - Thread Starter
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There's a lot to process here. First of all, no one new to front projection should ever limit themselves to a specific screen size like 100" without ever having experienced, let alone lived with one. I hope your friend isn't too difficult in terms of getting ideas in his head without being familiar with the subject.

Second, extensive lens shift is nice to have but not necessary as long as the positioning of a projector without extensive lens shift can be accommodated. It's necessary to understand all the fine details of the installation before knowing if extensive lens shift should be a priority.

Epson projectors can go very bright, especially on a smaller screen. But the projection calculator merely gives a screen brightness based on the projector's highest rated setting whereas the lowest real world setting can be less than a third as bright. So the calculator brightness numbers aren't reliable indicators.

A manual iris can be useful in evening out projector lamp brightness over the lamp's life as it dims with age. But as with extensive lens shift you pay a premium for this feature -- more than double the cost of the BenQ HT2050A. If your friend is willing to spend a lot more then it's worth considering an Epson 5000 series model with all the bells and whistles.

Are there specific reasons why your friend wants a motorized, tab tension, AT screen? It's a rare combination and limits options, which would be further limited if a grey screen is specified on top of that. A fixed screen would perform better at lower cost if it could be accommodated.

It seems like the options being considered are expanding rather than being reduced. One thing that might help narrow things down would be to get a firm budget limit from your friend. If he's only willing to spend up to a specific price point then there's no reason discussing options that would push his budget over that price point.

Regarding the size, that's exactly what I told him. 100" might sound huge, but until he has a chance to experience it in person in the space he'll never really know.

He needs the motorized AT screen because this is a multipurpose room that will also have a wall unit that holds a TV and speakers. The screen needs to come down in front of the wall unit and the speakers will be behind the screen. I realize it's a rare combination.

I think at this point with all the back and forth he and I have had, he's decided to eliminate the 5050 and focus on either the BenQ 3550 or the Epson 4010. Budget for projector+screen is ~$3K. The total for the project is ~$4k, but that'll include mount, wires, a new AVR (his current one is too old to pass 4K/HDR and he needs a second HDMI output), etc.
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post #19 of 22 Old 10-23-2019, 11:08 AM
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^ OK, that really narrows things down. With a ~$3k budget and either a BenQ HT3550 or Epson 4010 that leaves $1,200-$1,400 for the screen. At that price point you won't be able to get a premium motorized, tab tension, AT screen which can run several thousand dollars but should be able to find a decent mid-range model. From exactly 10' lens to screen the HT3550 can cover the full range of 100", 110" and 120" screens while the 4010 locks you into 100" max. Both of those projectors get good reviews with a different balance of pros and cons. With a 100" screen the user would have to weigh all the pros and cons of each and decide which pros are most important to him and which cons he can most easily live with. At 110" or 120' the HT3550 wins by default. Let us know how the trial run goes with your HT1075 at 100", 110" and 120".
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post #20 of 22 Old 10-24-2019, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
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^ OK, that really narrows things down. With a ~$3k budget and either a BenQ HT3550 or Epson 4010 that leaves $1,200-$1,400 for the screen. At that price point you won't be able to get a premium motorized, tab tension, AT screen which can run several thousand dollars but should be able to find a decent mid-range model. From exactly 10' lens to screen the HT3550 can cover the full range of 100", 110" and 120" screens while the 4010 locks you into 100" max. Both of those projectors get good reviews with a different balance of pros and cons. With a 100" screen the user would have to weigh all the pros and cons of each and decide which pros are most important to him and which cons he can most easily live with. At 110" or 120' the HT3550 wins by default. Let us know how the trial run goes with your HT1075 at 100", 110" and 120".
Yep that's exactly where we still. If 100", both projectors have their cons. Just a matter of which are impactful enough to affect the decision. As for the screen, you are correct. The best option I found was one from Seymour, but that alone will be about $3K. I also just realized that the cost of going to 110" in the screen he is current considering is a nearly $800 difference. Almost twice the price for 10 more inches. I don't think he had noticed that and once I did I told him that I don't think that's worth it for him. If he wants to spend that money he should get the 5050UB and call it a day. So I think the size tests with my projector are now out the window.

Still hoping to find a better screen than the Elite for <$1200, but at the moment I don't see anything that ticks most of the requirements.
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post #21 of 22 Old 10-24-2019, 08:40 PM
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Yep that's exactly where we still. If 100", both projectors have their cons. Just a matter of which are impactful enough to affect the decision. As for the screen, you are correct. The best option I found was one from Seymour, but that alone will be about $3K. I also just realized that the cost of going to 110" in the screen he is current considering is a nearly $800 difference. Almost twice the price for 10 more inches. I don't think he had noticed that and once I did I told him that I don't think that's worth it for him. If he wants to spend that money he should get the 5050UB and call it a day. So I think the size tests with my projector are now out the window.

Still hoping to find a better screen than the Elite for <$1200, but at the moment I don't see anything that ticks most of the requirements.
Check out XY screens, they have lots of variants and can do custom orders, often at a lower price.
Contact them or check out this thread:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/23-sc...on-review.html
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post #22 of 22 Old 10-25-2019, 05:57 AM
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pls delete

Last edited by DryEyes; 10-25-2019 at 08:16 AM. Reason: changed my mind
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