Help - Can I paint or replace screen material on silver ticket screen? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-04-2020, 03:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Help - Can I paint or replace screen material on silver ticket screen?

I currently have a 135" silverticket gray screen. It is in a room with great light control. However, I would like the option of watching movies with some ambient overhead lights on. I really like the silver ticket frame I have. It is edgeless and perfectly mounted on the wall.

Is it possible to paint the existing screen material with paint that can improve black levels?

Or would it be better to replace the screen material with something like Carl's ALR material or Cinegrey 3D? Not sure if this is even feasible as the frame is aluminum and there's nothing to staple the material to. I did consider perhaps gluing a wooden strips around the back of the perimeter of my existing silverticket aluminum frame and stapling the screen material to the wood.

Any thoughts on which would be the best solution? I would hate to throw away or try to sell this perfectly good and very silverticket screen and frame. Thanks!
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-04-2020, 04:43 PM
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It's not a good idea to use a projector with lights that hit the screen directly. Any light should not hit the screen directly. Lights should be placed in the viewing area, not the projector area.
Maybe get a a large TV.

Or a UST projector and a UST ALR screen. A lot of UST ALR's are specifically designed to block light from above.

This review looks at different types of ALR's and how they handle light from different directions.
Look for Ceiling Floods in the reviews:
https://www.projectorcentral.com/amb...rticle_id=1493

This is what an Cinegrey 3D looks like in four different scenarios. The fourth one is with a light from above.
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/23-sc...l#post58809924


Not sure about how to keep the frame.
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-05-2020, 08:00 AM
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Every screen will perform better in ambient light if kept in the shadows, even an ALR screen. Properly managing lighting should be the first step before spending money on a new screen. Assuming the overhead lights are can lights, try viewing with overhead lights on but unscrew the lights closest to the screen. If that works then put those lights on a separate circuit with a second wall switch or get smart lights that can be controlled by remote for the cans closest to the screen. If the overhead lights are still too bright replace the wall switch with a dimmer. Also, change projector from best picture mode to brightest mode. With ambient light polluting the screen image, colors are going to be skewed anyway so the brightest mode makes sense even if it's not as color accurate as the mode you use in the dark.
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 10:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenH View Post
Or would it be better to replace the screen material with something like Carl's ALR material or Cinegrey 3D? Not sure if this is even feasible as the frame is aluminum and there's nothing to staple the material to. I did consider perhaps gluing a wooden strips around the back of the perimeter of my existing silverticket aluminum frame and stapling the screen material to the wood.
The easiest way to to replace the screen material with the Silver Ticket High Contrast Grey which is very similar to the Cinegrey 3D.

You can also use other screen material and form the rod pockets using contact cement, and use the stock stretching/mounting hardware.
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post #5 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
The easiest way to to replace the screen material with the Silver Ticket High Contrast Grey which is very similar to the Cinegrey 3D.

You can also use other screen material and form the rod pockets using contact cement, and use the stock stretching/mounting hardware.

Haven't seen the ST HC grey in person, but I don't think it's similar to the 3D. It's darker and has less ALR properties:

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post #6 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by noob00224 View Post
Haven't seen the ST HC grey in person, but I don't think it's similar to the 3D. It's darker and has less ALR properties:
It's very hard to take pictures that provide an accurate representation of screen materials. In particular, ALR material must be totally flat, preferably stretched (which may be hard to do for small pieces of screen materials). Also, the direction of the light as well as the camera angle will make a big difference.

Here are two pictures that I took, comparing a letter-size sample of Silver Ticket HC Grey, with a full size piece (135" Designer Cut) of Elite Cinegrey 3D. Below them is a sheet of white paper as reference.

The first picture is with light coming from the same angle as the camera, so is representative of light coming from the projector.
The second picture is with light coming from the side at a fairly steep angle, and is representative of ambient light. The camera exposure is adjusted to provide the same brightness of the whit paper between the two shots. A darker material in the second picture would indicate a higher ambient light rejection, and both materials do a decent job.

I would challenge you to identify any meaningful differences between the two, either in terms of brightness (first picture) or ALR capability (second pictures).

EDIT: A some angle between the two extremes, the ST HCG does look a little darker than the 3D. You can consider that to be an advantage or disadvantage, depending you your viewing angle requirements and ambient light directions.
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Last edited by Dominic Chan; 01-07-2020 at 03:27 PM.
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 03:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
It's very hard to take pictures that provide an accurate representation of screen materials. In particular, ALR material must be totally flat, preferably stretched (which may be hard to do for small pieces of screen materials). Also, the direction of the light as well as the camera angle will make a big difference.

Here are two pictures that I took, comparing a letter-size sample of Silver Ticket HC Grey, with a full size piece (135" Designer Cut) of Elite Cinegrey 3D. Below them is a sheet of white paper as reference.

The first picture is with light coming from the same angle as the camera, so is representative of light coming from the projector.
The second picture is with light coming from the side at a fairly steep angle, and is representative of ambient light. The camera exposure is adjusted to provide the same brightness of the whit paper between the two shots. A darker material in the second picture would indicate a higher ambient light rejection, and both materials do a decent job.

I would challenge you to identify any meaningful differences between the two, either in terms of brightness (first picture) or ALR capability (second pictures).

EDIT: A some angle between the two extremes, the ST HCG does look a little darker than the 3D. You can consider that to be an advantage or disadvantage, depending you your viewing angle requirements and ambient light directions.
Very interesting.
Looking at the 3D on my screen directly it's darker shade of grey then in both of the pictures.

At what angles is the ST HCG darker?

Do you know of any hotspots or sparkle being present with this fabric?
Apparently the 3D sparkles even at 1.77x throw range.
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by noob00224 View Post
Very interesting.
Looking at the 3D on my screen directly it's darker shade of grey then in both of the pictures.
It's very difficult to compare pictures against real screens. That's why I only post pictures that contain side-by-side comparisons. As I mentioned previously, the difference changes with the angle of the light relative to the screen, and the viewing angle. That’s why the two pictures I posted look so different from each other.

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At what angles is the ST HCG darker?
Intermediate angles around 45 degrees, but the difference is so small that it only shows in a side-by-side picture. For actual viewing it's insignificant.

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Do you know of any hotspots or sparkle being present with this fabric?
Apparently the 3D sparkles even at 1.77x throw range.
If the gain varies with viewing angle (which is how ALR works) there will be hotspots, even though some of them are less noticeable than others. The longer the throw distance the less noticeable they get, as the viewing angle difference gets smaller between the centre and corners of the screen.
Sparkles are independent of throw range.
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Last edited by Dominic Chan; 01-07-2020 at 06:24 PM.
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post #9 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
It's very difficult to compare pictures against real screens. That's why I only post pictures that contain side-by-side comparisons. As I mentioned previously, the difference changes with the angle of the light relative to the screen, and the viewing angle.


Intermediate angles around 45 degrees, but the difference is so small that it only shows in a side-by-side picture. For actual viewing it's insignificant.


If the gain varies with viewing angle (which is how ALR works) there will be hotspots, even though some of them are less noticeable than others. The longer the throw distance the less noticeable they get, as the viewing angle difference gets smaller between the centre and corners of the screen.
Sparkles are independent of throw range.
But is there a minimum recommended throw ratio for the ST HCG?
For the 3D/5D it's 1.5x.
When the 5D was measured a few years ago it measured around 1.0 instead of the claimed 1.5 gain. I assume the 3D (1.2) is slightly higher than the 0.67 on the ST.
How do you measure the gain of screen, can it be done with a lux meter?
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post #10 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 04:27 PM
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But is there a minimum recommended throw ratio for the ST HCG?
For the 3D/5D it's 1.5x.
As mentioned in my previous post, the minimum throw ratio is intended to minimize hotspotting. It has nothing to do with sparkles, which depend on viewing distance rather than throw ratio.

Quote:
When the 5D was measured a few years ago it measured around 1.0 instead of the claimed 1.5 gain. I assume the 3D (1.2) is slightly higher than the 0.67 on the ST.
How do you measure the gain of screen, can it be done with a lux meter?
The lux meter measure incident light. To measure screen gains you need a colorimeter such as Spyder or i1Display Pro. In my previous post i used white paper as reference (unity gain) which is Ok for comparing different screens, but the “absolute” gains may be somewhat different.
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post #11 of 11 Old 01-07-2020, 04:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
As mentioned in my previous post, the minimum throw ratio is intended to minimize hotspotting. It has nothing to do with sparkles, which depend on viewing distance rather than throw ratio.
Minimum throw for hotspotting, not sparkles.
Could not find this information on ST's website, if there a minimum throw for the HCG?
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