Official JVC RS3000/NX9 - JVC RS2000/NX7/N7 - JVC RS1000/NX5/N5 - Owners Thread - Page 171 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 13321Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #5101 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 02:15 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by mauricef View Post
Unfortunately for me JVC USA missed a giant yellow splotch in the picture produced by my projector. Awaiting a replacement.
Sorry to hear that. Would you tell us what model JVC you have and perhaps the build date if possible. What steps have you taken to get your projector replaced? Any pics of the problem would be great if you can.
Spizz likes this.

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #5102 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 02:21 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by mauricef View Post
Unfortunately for me JVC USA missed a giant yellow splotch in the picture produced by my projector. Awaiting a replacement.
In what situation did you first notice this yellow splotch, if you can detail as much info as you can it will perhaps help those who may have a similar problem later.

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
post #5103 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 02:31 PM
aka jfinnie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Norwich, UK
Posts: 2,876
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2328 Post(s)
Liked: 1484
Quote:
Originally Posted by mauricef View Post
Unfortunately for me JVC USA missed a giant yellow splotch in the picture produced by my projector. Awaiting a replacement.
You might be able to shed some light on what you're seeing by looking at a sheet of paper close to the lens, with white, black, red, green, and blue projected separately. Defocussing the lens can sometimes bring contaminants into sharper focus.

Though the reality is you're going to be unable to do anything about it, it will be getting replaced. It's just interesting for us nerds.

I will say that:

The first rule of the paper test is we do not talk about the paper test.
The second rule of the paper test is WE DO NOT TALK ABOUT THE PAPER TEST!


Yellow on white is most usually something to do with the blue lightpath being obscured (ie blue light not getting through, hence leaving yellow from the combination of green and red), either due to a contaminant or damage to a component.
Kevin Snyder and Bytehoven like this.
bobof is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #5104 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 02:57 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Mike Garrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,562
Mentioned: 232 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11822 Post(s)
Liked: 9357
Send a message via Skype™ to Mike Garrett
Firmware 1.20 is available. If you have 1.16 you must first update to 1.17 before you update to 1.20.
Clark Burk, Spizz, smitty and 7 others like this.

Last edited by Mike Garrett; 02-09-2019 at 08:48 PM.
Mike Garrett is online now  
post #5105 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 02:59 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobof View Post
You might be able to shed some light on what you're seeing by looking at a sheet of paper close to the lens, with white, black, red, green, and blue projected separately. Defocussing the lens can sometimes bring contaminants into sharper focus.
You’re over my head with that explanation but maybe they know what you’re referring to. A pic of what they see may be of some help to those here.

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
post #5106 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:05 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Garrett View Post
JVC has issued new firmware. Firmware 1.20. It is not just a change in language. 1.20 will insure no iris issues, speed up the startup (D-ILA logo appears faster) and more.
Great to see JVC starting to use firmware updates for basic issues such as startup time. That’s a huge step forward!!!!!
desray2k, Mike Garrett and Dandlj like this.

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
post #5107 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:09 PM
aka jfinnie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Norwich, UK
Posts: 2,876
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2328 Post(s)
Liked: 1484
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Burk View Post
You’re over my head with that explanation but maybe they know what you’re referring to. A pic of what they see may be of some help to those here.
A projector is kind of like a backwards camera(ish). The projector lens is setup to focus tightly on the pixels which are located in a certain position in space relative to the screen. (think camera focused on a person, the background or something very close to the camera is left out of focus). Unless the damage or contaminant is in the chip in the same plane as the pixels, usually "bad stuff" that appears on the screen is out of focus because the lens is focused on the pixels, not the contaminant, which might be microns to inches away from the pixel focal plane. By adjusting the focus of the projector forwards or backwards (taking the pixels out of focus) you can usually bring into tighter focus any contaminants or issues.

Putting a piece of paper up to the lens (which changes the focal distance) can also bring contaminants into sharper focus.

But if you're happy with your projector don't do this (unless you're a masochist) as you might see all manner of stuff you didn't realise was there; but once you know where it is you may well find yourself being able to localise it in normal use even if it hadn't bothered you...
davidahn likes this.
bobof is offline  
post #5108 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:13 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobof View Post
A projector is kind of like a backwards camera(ish). The projector lens is setup to focus tightly on the pixels which are located in a certain position in space relative to the screen. (think camera focused on a person, the background or something very close to the camera is left out of focus). Unless the damage or contaminant is in the chip in the same plane as the pixels, usually "bad stuff" that appears on the screen is out of focus because the lens is focused on the pixels, not the contaminant, which might be microns to inches away from the pixel focal plane. By adjusting the focus of the projector forwards or backwards (taking the pixels out of focus) you can usually bring into tighter focus any contaminants or issues.

Putting a piece of paper up to the lens (which changes the focal distance) can also bring contaminants into sharper focus.

But if you're happy with your projector don't do this (unless you're a masochist) as you might see all manner of stuff you didn't realise was there; but once you know where it is you may well find yourself being able to localise it in normal use even if it hadn't bothered you...
Thanks for the explanation. Always eager to learn new things

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
post #5109 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:22 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
docrog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Okatie, SC
Posts: 1,292
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1060 Post(s)
Liked: 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Garrett View Post
JVC has issued new firmware. Firmware 1.20. It is not just a change in language. 1.20 will insure no iris issues, speed up the startup (D-ILA logo appears faster) and more.
Firmware update is not listed on the JVC site as of 6:20pm, 2/9/19. Any link?
desray2k likes this.
docrog is online now  
post #5110 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:34 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
desray2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,114
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Liked: 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Garrett View Post
JVC has issued new firmware. Firmware 1.20. It is not just a change in language. 1.20 will insure no iris issues, speed up the startup (D-ILA logo appears faster) and more.


I can’t seem to find this firmware release? Anyone has it can post a link or share the firmware? Thks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
desray2k is offline  
post #5111 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:39 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Craig Peer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 15,788
Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6619 Post(s)
Liked: 7691
Quote:
Originally Posted by woofer View Post
Can you possibly take a pic?
I've seen it. Looks like a small water mark from Countrytime Lemonaide !
Craig Peer is offline  
post #5112 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:50 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Peer View Post
I've seen it. Looks like a small water mark from Countrytime Lemonaide !
Really Craig?

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
post #5113 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:51 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
desray2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,114
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Liked: 225
Quick observation. Yesterday night I decided to pop in the Munsil and Spencer calibration disc and went through a few basic test patterns. I discovered that the Input level set to “Auto” screwed up the contrast. I need to set to “Super White 16-255” to get all the bars to be visible on the Contrast test pattern. If I switch to either PC 0-255 and Video 16-235, I can’t see the bars. By the way, I am calibrating for BT709 colour gamut.

Anyone has this experience?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
desray2k is offline  
post #5114 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 03:57 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadeRF View Post
Might want to hold off. I attempted an update from 1.17 -> 1.20 tonight on my RS3000. Update seemed to go fine and process appeared to complete as outlined in the update instructions. Now my projector turns on but never full boots and eventually just has the orange and red lights blinking alternating. Maybe I'm just lucky though...
Not surprised but thanks for the warning.

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
post #5115 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:03 PM
Member
 
rg4471's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Colorado, USA
Posts: 106
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Liked: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadeRF View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by docrog View Post
Firmware update is not listed on the JVC site as of 6:20pm, 2/9/19. Any link?
Might want to hold off. I attempted an update from 1.17 -> 1.20 tonight on my RS3000. Update seemed to go fine and process appeared to complete as outlined in the update instructions. Now my projector turns on but never fully boots and eventually just has the orange and red lights blinking alternating. Maybe I'm just lucky though...
Hopefully this is in-field recoverable.
rg4471 is offline  
post #5116 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:03 PM
aka jfinnie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Norwich, UK
Posts: 2,876
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2328 Post(s)
Liked: 1484
Quote:
Originally Posted by desray2k View Post
Quick observation. Yesterday night I decided to pop in the Munsil and Spencer calibration disc and went through a few basic test patterns. I discovered that the Input level set to “Auto” screwed up the contrast. I need to set to “Super White 16-255” to get all the bars to be visible on the Contrast test pattern. If I switch to either PC 0-255 and Video 16-235, I can’t see the bars. By the way, I am calibrating for BT709 colour gamut.

Anyone has this experience?
It's completely standard for a JVC projector. They are set up for maximum contrast, which involves not reserving the (extremely seldom used) Superwhite codes 236-255. They are instead hard clipped I think and the 16-235 range is expanded to fill the panel dynamic range.
Most folk are of the opinion that this is sensible. Some folk decide to enable super white and allow all codes up to 255 (I believe this was a notable THX recommendation though that may have changed); some decide to do a halfway house and allow a handful of codes above 235.

On previous year models it has been nice that in general you could leave contrast and brightness at 0 and they would be right if you were of the opinion that superwhite is a waste of contrast, and your room was dark enough to see code 17. I don't know if this is still the case.
desray2k and Manni01 like this.
bobof is offline  
post #5117 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:06 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
desray2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,114
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Liked: 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobof View Post
It's completely standard for a JVC projector. They are set up for maximum contrast, which involves not reserving the (extremely seldom used) Superwhite codes 236-255. They are instead hard clipped I think and the 16-235 range is expanded to fill the panel dynamic range.

Most folk are of the opinion that this is sensible. Some folk decide to enable super white and allow all codes up to 255 (I believe this was a notable THX recommendation though that may have changed); some decide to do a halfway house and allow a handful of codes above 235.



On previous year models it has been nice that in general you could leave contrast and brightness at 0 and they would be right if you were of the opinion that superwhite is a waste of contrast, and your room was dark enough to see code 17. I don't know if this is still the case.


Anyway, I just leave it at Super White for now after this little discovery. And yes, the contrast and brightness setting are spot on at “0” w/o the need for me to play with the setting.

I did change the colour to 3 and tint to -2 after calibration.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
desray2k is offline  
post #5118 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:07 PM
Senior Member
 
davidahn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Posts: 369
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobof View Post
They both have Dynamic Iris, which solely operates in the lens. The difference is that RS2000 also has a lamp iris in front of the lamp whose position is adjusted based on the "manual" setting chosen in the menus.

For me personally 100 lumens comes out in the wash. It is just over 5% light output increase, almost imperceptible on screen.

The big reason to get the RS2000 is the LAMP IRIS which gives higher native contrast, and the ability (reportedly) to hit 100% of DCI P3 with the addition of the colour filter (though that will use a reasonably significant number of lumens).
My bad, I totally read that wrong.

I will probably never use the fixed iris, as I have a 156" scope screen and need all the lumens I can get for HDR highlights.

JVC DLA-NX9 / 156" 2.4:1 CIH Seymour AT screen / Marantz AV7704 11.2 / Yamaha MX-A5000 11-ch amp
HTPC MadVR RTX 2080 / 24TB PMS Server (direct UHD rips)
Adam A8X monitor LCR / RBH A-610 x 8 / Kef Ci160ER x 4 / HSU ULS-15
Secondary: Samsung UN82MU8000 / Marantz NR1607 AVR / Kef Q150 + Minx Min 10 / SVS SB-2000
davidahn is offline  
post #5119 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:09 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Spizz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 3,786
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 450 Post(s)
Liked: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Garrett View Post
JVC has issued new firmware. Firmware 1.20. It is not just a change in language. 1.20 will insure no iris issues, speed up the startup (D-ILA logo appears faster) and more.
Good news. Looks like a few people are already on this firmware in this thread.

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-di...l#post57557330

It may fix the issue Woofer had where you could get the DI to lockup.

Last edited by Spizz; 02-09-2019 at 04:13 PM.
Spizz is offline  
post #5120 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:17 PM
Senior Member
 
davidahn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Posts: 369
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked: 59
Relatively Inky

Quote:
Originally Posted by woofer View Post
I am afraid we need to NOT use this term in reference with projectors as a whole..
You’re right, I meant relative to other PJs.

Incidentally, the blacks in most commercial theaters aren’t anywhere near as good as home theater projectors, so I can only guess our high standards for FPTV blacks are based on an unfair comparison between FPTVs and flat panels like OLEDs and plasmas.

JVC DLA-NX9 / 156" 2.4:1 CIH Seymour AT screen / Marantz AV7704 11.2 / Yamaha MX-A5000 11-ch amp
HTPC MadVR RTX 2080 / 24TB PMS Server (direct UHD rips)
Adam A8X monitor LCR / RBH A-610 x 8 / Kef Ci160ER x 4 / HSU ULS-15
Secondary: Samsung UN82MU8000 / Marantz NR1607 AVR / Kef Q150 + Minx Min 10 / SVS SB-2000
davidahn is offline  
post #5121 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:26 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
Industry Insider
 
Cleveland Plasma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 24,028
Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6407 Post(s)
Liked: 6403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Burk View Post
Great to see JVC starting to use firmware updates for basic issues such as startup time. That’s a huge step forward!!!!!
True that, projectors certainly do not seem to get the updates that TV's and other electronics get. Pretty amazing how some glitches can get fixed in the field with a download.....
Cleveland Plasma is offline  
post #5122 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:26 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Chad B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Bradford, OH
Posts: 2,716
Mentioned: 100 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 692 Post(s)
Liked: 1575
Review: RS3000

Cleveland AV owner Chris Majoros was kind enough to send me a new native 4K JVC RS3000, pulled from regular stock, to test and evaluate over a two week period. The RS3000 temporarily replaced my JVC RS67, and was shelf mounted right behind and just slightly above seated viewer’s heads. It projected from a distance of 144” onto a 119” diagonal, 16x9 Da-Lite High Power 2.8 gain screen.

Usability was excellent, and several things caught my attention as being especially noteworthy in comparison to other JVC models. Audible fan noise, even in high lamp power mode, seemed very quiet. This was especially welcome since my head was normally about two feet from the lens, and I did not use high lamp mode very often on the older RS67 due to excessive fan noise. Also, the resync or black out time when changing resolutions or signal type to the projector is much shorter than on any other recent JVC model, with worst case scenarios (SDR to HDR, lamp power change, aperture going from fully closed to fully open, color filter change) taking less than 11 seconds, with more typical times less than 7 seconds. The redesigned, backlit remote looks sleeker and feels more solid, but unlike the older design, it was very difficult and frustrating to try to operate by feel. Finally, there is a provision to instruct the projector which picture mode to switch to when HDR is input, which can be surprisingly handy. The RS3000 supports the popular HDR10 format and also HLG HDR, which is starting to emerge on a few sources including YouTube. Active HDR tone mapping, an important new feature, is designed to maintain the best brightness balance without crushing highlights. It also supports 3D which was not tested, but judging by other recent JVC models the RS3000’s 3D mode will be world class in every respect.

Displaying a black screen showed slight light corners, something JVC has struggled with for some time. It was not quite as bad as on my RS67, and while it did not bother me, I do know some people who would find it distracting. This characteristic seemed somewhat middle of the road in my opinion, having personally seen both better and worse examples in late model JVCs. Gray and white field uniformity was excellent with the lens aperture in the upper two thirds of it’s range, with a just barely perceptible green shift to the right. However, the green shift became much more visible at or below an aperture setting of -11, so even with small or high gain screens staying at or above -10 may be advisable.

Focus was superb over most of the screen, reminding me strongly of JVC’s excellent RS4500, though the bottom right was slightly softer.

Before calibration:

Familiar scenes in Lucy looked great in the HDR10 picture mode, with excellent highights and definition. The picture was extremely punchy and dynamic. The Active Tone Mapping appeared to be working very well, although my unusually bright setup does not provide much of a challenge for it. Shadow detail was surprisingly strong, perhaps a bit too much for this movie which normally crushes near black detail. Blacks within the movie frame were slightly elevated, causing the 2.40 movie frame to glow. This is not a byproduct of the RS3000’s contrast; rather, it is caused by the factory calibration jumping out of black too fast. Otherwise, the blacks looked excellent. Colors were very pleasing on Lucy, but checking my reference images showed the out of the box HDR color to be somewhat on the pale side. Watching First Man on 4K HDR Blu Ray for the first time was not nearly as satisfying, lacking in definition and appearing excessively grainy, though it appears the projector was just displaying flaws in the movie.

Watching a bit of normal 1080P TV shows before calibration was very enjoyable; the image was powerful and very much like a large, high quality flat panel. The only distraction were some skin tones and brown shades that seemed a bit violet or lavender.

Calibration:

The Spyder autocal software available on the JVC Kenwood website has been a useful tool for making gamma and colors more linear on recent models, and a new version of the software must be downloaded for each model year. The autocal should always be verified and fine tuned by third party software and better quality meters, or all that is likely to happen is the inaccuracies will just be shifted around with little overall improvement. In the case of the RS3000, running autocal degraded overall more than it improved. Despite running a color autocal run at each 5 step interval of the lens aperture, after autocal the white balance started off relatively accurate at an aperture setting of 0 and gradually became very cool as -15 was approached. I reran the various autocal procedures with no improvement, and then even repositioned and reaimed the Spyder5 before running the procedures a final time with no better results. Having preformed autocal on all the recent JVC models, I knew better than to expect a completely bug free experience, but this along with other shortcomings in the autocal results was especially discouraging.

The RS3000 was very quirky when it came to precise calibration. Say, for example, the user menu Color Temp. and Gamma menus were precisely calibrated after running autocal. If I then went in and changed the Color Temp. and Gamma numbers, measured the results, and then put the original calibrated numbers back in and measured again, the final results were often different than the original results using the same numbers. The shift may not have been enough to be visually significant to most viewers (change in dE2K was generally less than 2 or 3), but it is enough to cause a great deal of frustration when fine tuning the calibration. I have seen some other recent JVCs with similar behavior, though plenty do not show it.

I was surprised at the RS3000’s scaling and pixel structure with 1080P focus patterns. Focus and other finely detailed patterns looked chunky and lumpy rather than crisp and sharp, and changing or disengaging the e-shift had no effect with 1080P. It was easily visible upon careful and up close examination, but could even be seen from my normal viewing position. Thankfully, it did not draw attention to itself on the normal 1080P images I viewed, and if it did an easy fix would be to upscale any 1080P sources to 4K before going to the projector. Owners of high quality 4K Blu Ray players should have the player upscale Blu Rays to 4K to avoid this. 4K (as opposed to 1080P) focus patterns looked great and did not suffer the same effect. The 8K E-Shift changed and rounded the fine structure of 4K just as the 4K E-Shift did with 1080P on JVC’s other recent models, and engaging it will be a matter of personal taste.

Input lag with a 1080P input, which is the only resolution the lag tester is capable of, measured 42 ms in any picture mode with any settings, provided CMD in the Motion Control submenu was turned off. With CMD on, it was 103 ms, again in any mode and with any other settings. Curiously, the low latency setting had no impact at all other than locking CMD in the off position.

CMD did increase motion resolution, but at the expense of introducing the much scorned Soap Opera Effect. The last item in the Motion Control submenu, Motion Enhance, did not increase real motion resolution but did slightly exaggerate sharpness of the motion resolution that was already resolved. There did not seem to be any significant difference in motion handling between the RS3000 and other recent JVCs with normal film and TV content, although admittedly serious sports fans sometimes notice differences that escape me in this regard.

The on/off contrast ratio after calibration, measured with a Klein K-10 facing the lens with a diffuser to maximize the meter’s dynamic range, was 20,868:1. Closing the lens aperture, which should be possible in many installations for normal HD, will increase this number, which should be viewed as more of a minimum. Just how much the aperture can and should be reduced is determined mainly by the screen size and gain, along with the throw distance and viewer preference. Also, using the Auto aperture settings will dramatically multiply these numbers. Although lower than JVC’s past lamp based flagships including my own RS67, I thought the RS3000’s contrast looked very rich and deep.

Full field on/off CR, manual aperture:
0: 20,868:1
-5: 31,442:1
-10: 42,144:1
-15: 59,920:1

10% size, 25% APL window CR, manual aperture:
0: 1,788:1
-5: 1,953:1
-10: 2,329:1
-15: 2,312:1

Modified ANSI, measured only at one point of a 4x4 checkerboard, manual aperture:
0: 197:1
-15: 222:1

Switching from low lamp power to high gave a 27.5% increase in light output. Engaging the color filter cut light output by 15%. Since the HDR P3 color volume was near 94% even without the filter, I believe JVC’s choice of making the default HDR10 mode not use the color filter to be a wise one.

After calibration, the RS3000’s measured performance (color, grayscale tracking, and gamma) was virtually flawless in SDR mode.

The following supplemental measurements are attached in zipped folders:

SDR gamut luminance, SDR skin tone color checker, SDR saturation sweep at 100%, SDR saturation sweep at 50%, SDR saturation sweep at 15%, SDR color volume analysis.

HDR NF color volume analysis, HDR NF gamut luminance, HDR Color Filter color volume analysis, HDR Color Filter gamut luminance.

Running across some older but well preserved screen samples, it seemed interesting to do a comparison of different materials to get an idea of light output and performance compared to the long discontinued High Power screen. Even many of these materials have been discontinued, however. Nits and fL were measured directly off the screen with a Jeti 1211 reference spectroradiometer and are accurate real world numbers; lumens, on the other hand, are calculated and rely on accurate screen gain ratings. Since manufacturer’s gain ratings are notoriously inaccurate, the exact lumens numbers are not listed below. However, averaging the four most believable results gives an estimation of 1,593 lumens calibrated in high lamp without color filter.

Light output at 100% stimulus, 119” diagonal screen, 144” throw, high lamp, no color filter, 97 hours on bulb:

Da-Lite High Power 2.8: 413.4 nits, 120.65 fL (used for calibration)
Da-Lite High Power 2.4: 334.7 nits, 97.7 fL
Carada High Contrast Grey .8: 57.8 nits, 16.9 fL
Carada Brilliant White 1.4: 144.16 nits, 42.1 fL
Elite Screens AcousticPro1080 woven (with added black backing) 1.0: 107.07 nits, 31.25 fL
Elite Screens CineWhite 1.1: 123.46 nits, 36.03 fL
Elite Screens MaxWhite FG 1.1: 133.26 nits, 38.89 fL

Same as above, except low lamp power:
Da-Lite High Power 2.8: 324.18 nits, 94.62 fL

Same as above, except with color filter:
Da-Lite 2.8 HP: 359.55 nits, 104.94 fL

After calibration:

Watching some Netflix SDR HD material provided an opportunity to see how some shows I had been watching on my LG 55C8 OLED fared on the big screen. One older drama took a little getting used to; compression artifacts were more visible, but colors, including fleshtones, were both vibrant and natural. The image looked a little more “enhanced” overall than on the smaller screen, but as the show progressed it made a valiant effort to draw me in. Overall, it was very good, but I felt the presentation was a bit too ruthlessly revealing of this somewhat mediocre quality content. Switching the source’s output from 1080P to 4K made no distinguishable difference, something that needed to be checked because of the RS3000’s odd look with 1080P focus patterns.

Switching to a newer, more visually stimulating cooking show really brought out the RS3000’s strengths: popping color, wonderful depth, and photorealistic textures. The calibrated Dark Room mode, with it’s lower lens aperture setting, showed that in the right environment the RS3000’s contrast provides the image with a fantastic sense of dynamics. I tried the Auto aperture setting on both the Dark Room and Bright modes, and I could both see and hear it working more in the Bright mode. Fortunately, on these shows I saw no weaknesses or side effects of the Auto setting, and in the Bright room mode it kept fade to blacks nice and deep.

Switching to familiar reference 4K HDR Blu Rays, the image was, as expected, simply stunning in HDR Bright (a renamed User mode based off high lamp, no color filter, Auto 2 aperture, and custom gamma curve). The incredible light output, combined with the Auto aperture (AKA Dynamic Iris), led to a powerful image that had to be seen to be believed. Shadow detail was nicely balanced, and colors were rich and satisfying. Revisiting First Man, colors were noticeably better than before, but it still proved to be one of the less visually compelling 4K HDR releases.

I had until recently been lukewarm in my appreciation of JVC’s DI (Dynamic Iris). It has had problems with blooming of small and bright objects, maintaining accuracy in shadow detail of dark scenes, and general stability. I was pleasantly surprised when I tried two chapters in The Greatest Showman that have, on previous JVCs, highlighted these issues. First, starting around 5:53 of chapter 2, shadow detail on the RS3000 was not crushed even with the more aggressive Auto 1 DI setting. A ticking sound was audible as the DI worked, but it was clear that it made a substantial improvement in visible contrast of this dark scene without seriously compromising shadow detail.

Next up was chapter 11, where the DI in previous models has made a blooming mess of Barnum as a bright spotlight shines on him from a distant camera view. The RS3000 performed admirably on this test, with only the faintest hint of compression visible when compared to a Manual aperture setting. This was nothing like the waxy, glazed over look seen in older models, and good enough to firmly win over this DI skeptic.

A new feature of the RS3000 is the Auto Tone Mapping feature for HDR, which analyzes metadata in the program and gives a Mapping Level control with a range of + or -5 to adjust brightness. This Mapping Level control is almost always going to be used to brighten the image rather than to darken, so it can be thought of as a brightness boost with five levels of strength. Up to this point, the RS3000 had the advantage of an extremely bright setup. To give the RS3000 a nice torture test, I closed the aperture all the way and made a new 80 nit Custom gamma curve with Arve’s tool to compare with JVC’s Auto Tone Mapping. This will give a closer approximation to the light output of an RS3000 on a larger, lower gain screen.

The RS3000 did not pick up any metadata from The Greatest Showman, so the Auto Tone Mapping could not be engaged. Planet Earth II, which would have been a good test for highlights with it’s bright clouds and snow, was the same. Switching to Lucy, it was not until the Mapping Level was turned all the way up to +5 when the overall brightness of the ATM approached that of the Custom gamma curve. At this setting, the JVC’s ATM looked polite and inoffensive, with very well controlled highlights, but somewhat anemic. Shadow detail was noticeably elevated, which when combined with the reined in highlights, robbed the image of it’s depth. The Custom curve was much punchier and looked more like what one would expect from HDR, with more balanced shadow detail and brighter, though occasionally more compressed, highlights. It is interesting to note that, while the ATM seemed very impressive in the before calibration round of viewing, the result in this round of testing was less positive. Before calibration, the image benefited from full brightness of several hundred nits and the Mapping Level was at it’s default of 0. On the other hand, in this torture test, the brightness was intentionally limited to better match what would be seen on a large, lower gain screen, and Mapping Level had to be increased all the way to give the image enough brightness. It appears that the RS3000’s ATM tends to loose punch and depth when attempting to brighten the image for low light output installations. Overall, I felt the ATM was a significant advancement over what has previously been available, but I believe users with low to moderate light output setups will find it lacking in impact and pop.

Conclusion:

The RS3000 is a significant advancement in many ways over JVC’s previous models, which is saying a lot. Native 4K resolution and excellent focus give fantastic detail. The improvements in the Dynamic Iris are significant, and make it a very useful enhancement that can be used without reservation. Even though the measured contrast numbers were not as strong as other recent lamp based JVCs, the DI improvement minimized or made up for any visible contrast difference in my situation. The RS3000’s image reminded me of JVC’s much more expensive RS4500, and it’s time in my home theater was amazingly satisfying.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 Bright-page-001.jpg
Views:	129
Size:	226.0 KB
ID:	2522930   Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 Bright-page-002.jpg
Views:	124
Size:	242.4 KB
ID:	2522932   Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 Bright-page-003.jpg
Views:	121
Size:	204.2 KB
ID:	2522934   Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 Bright-page-004.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	186.2 KB
ID:	2522936   Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 HDR Bright-page-001.jpg
Views:	118
Size:	226.2 KB
ID:	2522938  

Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 HDR Bright-page-002.jpg
Views:	111
Size:	147.7 KB
ID:	2522940   Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 HDR Bright-page-003.jpg
Views:	114
Size:	223.4 KB
ID:	2522942   Click image for larger version

Name:	JVC RS3000 HDR Bright-page-004.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	192.1 KB
ID:	2522944  
Attached Files
File Type: zip SDR.zip (827.3 KB, 81 views)
File Type: zip HDR NF.zip (406.3 KB, 74 views)
File Type: zip HDR Color Filter.zip (408.3 KB, 74 views)
Clark Burk, Spizz, smitty and 37 others like this.

touring ISF/THX calibrator with Jeti 1211 and Klein K-10
Latest reviews:JVC RS540, JVC RS3000, Sony VPL-VW695ES
Copied settings measured, Review archive
Chad B is offline  
post #5123 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:36 PM
Member
 
ShadeRF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 161
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by rg4471 View Post
Hopefully this is in-field recoverable.
Fingers crossed. I will update when I find out more. I've reached out to my dealer.

Theater Equipment list:
JVC RS3000, Panamorph Paladin DCR, 138", Lumagen Pro, Stewart 138" 2:35:1 Screen, Oppo UDP-203, DirecTV Genie, Marantz SR-6011, Emotiva XPA-5 Mains: Paradigm Prestige 85F, Center: Paradigm Prestige 55C, Sides: Paradigm Prestige 15B, Rears: Paradigm Atom V6 Atmos: Paradigm P65-R Sub: Rhythmik FV18, GIK Acoustic Room Treatments
ShadeRF is offline  
post #5124 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:40 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
smitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 2,704
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 750 Post(s)
Liked: 988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post
Cleveland AV owner Chris Majoros was kind enough to send me a new native 4K JVC RS3000, pulled from regular stock, to test and evaluate over a two week period. The RS3000 temporarily replaced my JVC RS67, and was shelf mounted right behind and just slightly above seated viewer’s heads. It projected from a distance of 144” onto a 119” diagonal, 16x9 Da-Lite High Power 2.8 gain screen.
Chad, thanks for that review and all that useful information. One question. I also have one of the Da-Lite High Power screens. Did you have any problems achieving an appropriate level of brightness for SDR material on the HP screen. Did you clamp down the iris and if so, to what settings?
Chad B likes this.
smitty is offline  
post #5125 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:48 PM
Advanced Member
 
tommarra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 572 Post(s)
Liked: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post
Cleveland AV owner Chris Majoros was kind enough to send me a new native 4K JVC RS3000, pulled from regular stock, to test and evaluate over a two week period. The RS3000 temporarily replaced my JVC RS67, and was shelf mounted right behind and just slightly above seated viewer’s heads. It projected from a distance of 144” onto a 119” diagonal, 16x9 Da-Lite High Power 2.8 gain screen.



Usability was excellent, and several things caught my attention as being especially noteworthy in comparison to other JVC models. Audible fan noise, even in high lamp power mode, seemed very quiet. This was especially welcome since my head was normally about two feet from the lens, and I did not use high lamp mode very often on the older RS67 due to excessive fan noise. Also, the resync or black out time when changing resolutions or signal type to the projector is much shorter than on any other recent JVC model, with worst case scenarios (SDR to HDR, lamp power change, aperture going from fully closed to fully open, color filter change) taking less than 11 seconds, with more typical times less than 7 seconds. The redesigned, backlit remote looks sleeker and feels more solid, but unlike the older design, it was very difficult and frustrating to try to operate by feel. Finally, there is a provision to instruct the projector which picture mode to switch to when HDR is input, which can be surprisingly handy. The RS3000 supports the popular HDR10 format and also HLG HDR, which is starting to emerge on a few sources including YouTube. Active HDR tone mapping, an important new feature, is designed to maintain the best brightness balance without crushing highlights. It also supports 3D which was not tested, but judging by other recent JVC models the RS3000’s 3D mode will be world class in every respect.



Displaying a black screen showed slight light corners, something JVC has struggled with for some time. It was not quite as bad as on my RS67, and while it did not bother me, I do know some people who would find it distracting. This characteristic seemed somewhat middle of the road in my opinion, having personally seen both better and worse examples in late model JVCs. Gray and white field uniformity was excellent with the lens aperture in the upper two thirds of it’s range, with a just barely perceptible green shift to the right. However, the green shift became much more visible at or below an aperture setting of -11, so even with small or high gain screens staying at or above -10 may be advisable.



Focus was superb over most of the screen, reminding me strongly of JVC’s excellent RS4500, though the bottom right was slightly softer.



Before calibration:



Familiar scenes in Lucy looked great in the HDR10 picture mode, with excellent highights and definition. The picture was extremely punchy and dynamic. The Active Tone Mapping appeared to be working very well, although my unusually bright setup does not provide much of a challenge for it. Shadow detail was surprisingly strong, perhaps a bit too much for this movie which normally crushes near black detail. Blacks within the movie frame were slightly elevated, causing the 2.40 movie frame to glow. This is not a byproduct of the RS3000’s contrast; rather, it is caused by the factory calibration jumping out of black too fast. Otherwise, the blacks looked excellent. Colors were very pleasing on Lucy, but checking my reference images showed the out of the box HDR color to be somewhat on the pale side. Watching First Man on 4K HDR Blu Ray for the first time was not nearly as satisfying, lacking in definition and appearing excessively grainy, though it appears the projector was just displaying flaws in the movie.



Watching a bit of normal 1080P TV shows before calibration was very enjoyable; the image was powerful and very much like a large, high quality flat panel. The only distraction were some skin tones and brown shades that seemed a bit violet or lavender.



Calibration:



The Spyder autocal software available on the JVC Kenwood website has been a useful tool for making gamma and colors more linear on recent models, and a new version of the software must be downloaded for each model year. The autocal should always be verified and fine tuned by third party software and better quality meters, or all that is likely to happen is the inaccuracies will just be shifted around with little overall improvement. In the case of the RS3000, running autocal degraded overall more than it improved. Despite running a color autocal run at each 5 step interval of the lens aperture, after autocal the white balance started off relatively accurate at an aperture setting of 0 and gradually became very cool as -15 was approached. I reran the various autocal procedures with no improvement, and then even repositioned and reaimed the Spyder5 before running the procedures a final time with no better results. Having preformed autocal on all the recent JVC models, I knew better than to expect a completely bug free experience, but this along with other shortcomings in the autocal results was especially discouraging.



The RS3000 was very quirky when it came to precise calibration. Say, for example, the user menu Color Temp. and Gamma menus were precisely calibrated after running autocal. If I then went in and changed the Color Temp. and Gamma numbers, measured the results, and then put the original calibrated numbers back in and measured again, the final results were often different than the original results using the same numbers. The shift may not have been enough to be visually significant to most viewers (change in dE2K was generally less than 2 or 3), but it is enough to cause a great deal of frustration when fine tuning the calibration. I have seen some other recent JVCs with similar behavior, though plenty do not show it.



I was surprised at the RS3000’s scaling and pixel structure with 1080P focus patterns. Focus and other finely detailed patterns looked chunky and lumpy rather than crisp and sharp, and changing or disengaging the e-shift had no effect with 1080P. It was easily visible upon careful and up close examination, but could even be seen from my normal viewing position. Thankfully, it did not draw attention to itself on the normal 1080P images I viewed, and if it did an easy fix would be to upscale any 1080P sources to 4K before going to the projector. Owners of high quality 4K Blu Ray players should have the player upscale Blu Rays to 4K to avoid this. 4K (as opposed to 1080P) focus patterns looked great and did not suffer the same effect. The 8K E-Shift changed and rounded the fine structure of 4K just as the 4K E-Shift did with 1080P on JVC’s other recent models, and engaging it will be a matter of personal taste.



Input lag with a 1080P input, which is the only resolution the lag tester is capable of, measured 42 ms in any picture mode with any settings, provided CMD in the Motion Control submenu was turned off. With CMD on, it was 103 ms, again in any mode and with any other settings. Curiously, the low latency setting had no impact at all other than locking CMD in the off position.



CMD did increase motion resolution, but at the expense of introducing the much scorned Soap Opera Effect. The last item in the Motion Control submenu, Motion Enhance, did not increase real motion resolution but did slightly exaggerate sharpness of the motion resolution that was already resolved. There did not seem to be any significant difference in motion handling between the RS3000 and other recent JVCs with normal film and TV content, although admittedly serious sports fans sometimes notice differences that escape me in this regard.



The on/off contrast ratio after calibration, measured with a Klein K-10 facing the lens with a diffuser to maximize the meter’s dynamic range, was 20,868:1. Closing the lens aperture, which should be possible in many installations for normal HD, will increase this number, which should be viewed as more of a minimum. Just how much the aperture can and should be reduced is determined mainly by the screen size and gain, along with the throw distance and viewer preference. Also, using the Auto aperture settings will dramatically multiply these numbers. Although lower than JVC’s past lamp based flagships including my own RS67, I thought the RS3000’s contrast looked very rich and deep.



Full field on/off CR, manual aperture:

0: 20,868:1

-5: 31,442:1

-10: 42,144:1

-15: 59,920:1



10% size, 25% APL window CR, manual aperture:

0: 1,788:1

-5: 1,953:1

-10: 2,329:1

-15: 2,312:1



Modified ANSI, measured only at one point of a 4x4 checkerboard, manual aperture:

0: 197:1

-15: 222:1



Switching from low lamp power to high gave a 27.5% increase in light output. Engaging the color filter cut light output by 15%. Since the HDR P3 color volume was near 94% even without the filter, I believe JVC’s choice of making the default HDR10 mode not use the color filter to be a wise one.



After calibration, the RS3000’s measured performance (color, grayscale tracking, and gamma) was virtually flawless in SDR mode.



The following supplemental measurements are attached in zipped folders:



SDR gamut luminance, SDR skin tone color checker, SDR saturation sweep at 100%, SDR saturation sweep at 50%, SDR saturation sweep at 15%, SDR color volume analysis.



HDR NF color volume analysis, HDR NF gamut luminance, HDR Color Filter color volume analysis, HDR Color Filter gamut luminance.



Running across some older but well preserved screen samples, it seemed interesting to do a comparison of different materials to get an idea of light output and performance compared to the long discontinued High Power screen. Even many of these materials have been discontinued, however. Nits and fL were measured directly off the screen with a Jeti 1211 reference spectroradiometer and are accurate real world numbers; lumens, on the other hand, are calculated and rely on accurate screen gain ratings. Since manufacturer’s gain ratings are notoriously inaccurate, the exact lumens numbers are not listed below. However, averaging the four most believable results gives an estimation of 1,593 lumens calibrated in high lamp without color filter.



Light output at 100% stimulus, 119” diagonal screen, 144” throw, high lamp, no color filter, 97 hours on bulb:



Da-Lite High Power 2.8: 413.4 nits, 120.65 fL (used for calibration)

Da-Lite High Power 2.4: 334.7 nits, 97.7 fL

Carada High Contrast Grey .8: 57.8 nits, 16.9 fL

Carada Brilliant White 1.4: 144.16 nits, 42.1 fL

Elite Screens AcousticPro1080 woven (with added black backing) 1.0: 107.07 nits, 31.25 fL

Elite Screens CineWhite 1.1: 123.46 nits, 36.03 fL

Elite Screens MaxWhite FG 1.1: 133.26 nits, 38.89 fL



Same as above, except low lamp power:

Da-Lite High Power 2.8: 324.18 nits, 94.62 fL



Same as above, except with color filter:

Da-Lite 2.8 HP: 359.55 nits, 104.94 fL



After calibration:



Watching some Netflix SDR HD material provided an opportunity to see how some shows I had been watching on my LG 55C8 OLED fared on the big screen. One older drama took a little getting used to; compression artifacts were more visible, but colors, including fleshtones, were both vibrant and natural. The image looked a little more “enhanced” overall than on the smaller screen, but as the show progressed it made a valiant effort to draw me in. Overall, it was very good, but I felt the presentation was a bit too ruthlessly revealing of this somewhat mediocre quality content. Switching the source’s output from 1080P to 4K made no distinguishable difference, something that needed to be checked because of the RS3000’s odd look with 1080P focus patterns.



Switching to a newer, more visually stimulating cooking show really brought out the RS3000’s strengths: popping color, wonderful depth, and photorealistic textures. The calibrated Dark Room mode, with it’s lower lens aperture setting, showed that in the right environment the RS3000’s contrast provides the image with a fantastic sense of dynamics. I tried the Auto aperture setting on both the Dark Room and Bright modes, and I could both see and hear it working more in the Bright mode. Fortunately, on these shows I saw no weaknesses or side effects of the Auto setting, and in the Bright room mode it kept fade to blacks nice and deep.



Switching to familiar reference 4K HDR Blu Rays, the image was, as expected, simply stunning in HDR Bright (a renamed User mode based off high lamp, no color filter, Auto 2 aperture, and custom gamma curve). The incredible light output, combined with the Auto aperture (AKA Dynamic Iris), led to a powerful image that had to be seen to be believed. Shadow detail was nicely balanced, and colors were rich and satisfying. Revisiting First Man, colors were noticeably better than before, but it still proved to be one of the less visually compelling 4K HDR releases.



I had until recently been lukewarm in my appreciation of JVC’s DI (Dynamic Iris). It has had problems with blooming of small and bright objects, maintaining accuracy in shadow detail of dark scenes, and general stability. I was pleasantly surprised when I tried two chapters in The Greatest Showman that have, on previous JVCs, highlighted these issues. First, starting around 5:53 of chapter 2, shadow detail on the RS3000 was not crushed even with the more aggressive Auto 1 DI setting. A ticking sound was audible as the DI worked, but it was clear that it made a substantial improvement in visible contrast of this dark scene without seriously compromising shadow detail.



Next up was chapter 11, where the DI in previous models has made a blooming mess of Barnum as a bright spotlight shines on him from a distant camera view. The RS3000 performed admirably on this test, with only the faintest hint of compression visible when compared to a Manual aperture setting. This was nothing like the waxy, glazed over look seen in older models, and good enough to firmly win over this DI skeptic.



A new feature of the RS3000 is the Auto Tone Mapping feature for HDR, which analyzes metadata in the program and gives a Mapping Level control with a range of + or -5 to adjust brightness. This Mapping Level control is almost always going to be used to brighten the image rather than to darken, so it can be thought of as a brightness boost with five levels of strength. Up to this point, the RS3000 had the advantage of an extremely bright setup. To give the RS3000 a nice torture test, I closed the aperture all the way and made a new 80 nit Custom gamma curve with Arve’s tool to compare with JVC’s Auto Tone Mapping. This will give a closer approximation to the light output of an RS3000 on a larger, lower gain screen.



The RS3000 did not pick up any metadata from The Greatest Showman, so the Auto Tone Mapping could not be engaged. Planet Earth II, which would have been a good test for highlights with it’s bright clouds and snow, was the same. Switching to Lucy, it was not until the Mapping Level was turned all the way up to +5 when the overall brightness of the ATM approached that of the Custom gamma curve. At this setting, the JVC’s ATM looked polite and inoffensive, with very well controlled highlights, but somewhat anemic. Shadow detail was noticeably elevated, which when combined with the reined in highlights, robbed the image of it’s depth. The Custom curve was much punchier and looked more like what one would expect from HDR, with more balanced shadow detail and brighter, though occasionally more compressed, highlights. It is interesting to note that, while the ATM seemed very impressive in the before calibration round of viewing, the result in this round of testing was less positive. Before calibration, the image benefited from full brightness of several hundred nits and the Mapping Level was at it’s default of 0. On the other hand, in this torture test, the brightness was intentionally limited to better match what would be seen on a large, lower gain screen, and Mapping Level had to be increased all the way to give the image enough brightness. It appears that the RS3000’s ATM tends to loose punch and depth when attempting to brighten the image for low light output installations. Overall, I felt the ATM was a significant advancement over what has previously been available, but I believe users with low to moderate light output setups will find it lacking in impact and pop.



Conclusion:



The RS3000 is a significant advancement in many ways over JVC’s previous models, which is saying a lot. Native 4K resolution and excellent focus give fantastic detail. The improvements in the Dynamic Iris are significant, and make it a very useful enhancement that can be used without reservation. Even though the measured contrast numbers were not as strong as other recent lamp based JVCs, the DI improvement minimized or made up for any visible contrast difference in my situation. The RS3000’s image reminded me of JVC’s much more expensive RS4500, and it’s time in my home theater was amazingly satisfying.


Thank you for the detailed review... Something which only an ace calibrator like you can do. If you get your hands on a NX7 would love to hear your thoughts about it too.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Chad B likes this.

Gear: Fronts: B&W 803D3 | Center: B&W HTM2D3 | Surrounds: B&W 705S2 | Backs: B&W DM601S3 | Heights: Definitive Techonlogy ProCinema 1000 | Receiver & Amps: Anthem MRX 720 + Emotiva BasX-5 | Projector: JVC NX7 | Source: HTPC with Nvidia 2070, Kodi + External Player: MPC-HC with MadVR (for Blu-ray rips), Nvidia Shield (for streaming content)
tommarra is offline  
post #5126 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:53 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
desray2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,114
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Liked: 225
Thanks Chad for the review.

Sent from my CMR-W09 using Tapatalk
Chad B likes this.
desray2k is offline  
post #5127 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:55 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Chad B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Bradford, OH
Posts: 2,716
Mentioned: 100 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 692 Post(s)
Liked: 1575
Quote:
Originally Posted by smitty View Post
Chad, thanks for that review and all that useful information. One question. I also have one of the Da-Lite High Power screens. Did you have any problems achieving an appropriate level of brightness for SDR material on the HP screen. Did you clamp down the iris and if so, to what settings?


Yes, I initially calibrated the dark room mode at -15, but that was before I noticed the nonuniformity at that setting. I then modified it to -10 which was technically too bright, but I liked it a lot!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
smitty, mbw23air and Craig Peer like this.

touring ISF/THX calibrator with Jeti 1211 and Klein K-10
Latest reviews:JVC RS540, JVC RS3000, Sony VPL-VW695ES
Copied settings measured, Review archive
Chad B is offline  
post #5128 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:56 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Clark Burk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Baltimore,MD.USA
Posts: 1,943
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post
Cleveland AV owner Chris Majoros was kind enough to send me a new native 4K JVC RS3000, pulled from regular stock, to test and evaluate over a two week period. The RS3000 temporarily replaced my JVC RS67, and was shelf mounted right behind and just slightly above seated viewer’s heads. It projected from a distance of 144” onto a 119” diagonal, 16x9 Da-Lite High Power 2.8 gain screen.

Usability was excellent, and several things caught my attention as being especially noteworthy in comparison to other JVC models. Audible fan noise, even in high lamp power mode, seemed very quiet. This was especially welcome since my head was normally about two feet from the lens, and I did not use high lamp mode very often on the older RS67 due to excessive fan noise. Also, the resync or black out time when changing resolutions or signal type to the projector is much shorter than on any other recent JVC model, with worst case scenarios (SDR to HDR, lamp power change, aperture going from fully closed to fully open, color filter change) taking less than 11 seconds, with more typical times less than 7 seconds. The redesigned, backlit remote looks sleeker and feels more solid, but unlike the older design, it was very difficult and frustrating to try to operate by feel. Finally, there is a provision to instruct the projector which picture mode to switch to when HDR is input, which can be surprisingly handy. The RS3000 supports the popular HDR10 format and also HLG HDR, which is starting to emerge on a few sources including YouTube. Active HDR tone mapping, an important new feature, is designed to maintain the best brightness balance without crushing highlights. It also supports 3D which was not tested, but judging by other recent JVC models the RS3000’s 3D mode will be world class in every respect.

Displaying a black screen showed slight light corners, something JVC has struggled with for some time. It was not quite as bad as on my RS67, and while it did not bother me, I do know some people who would find it distracting. This characteristic seemed somewhat middle of the road in my opinion, having personally seen both better and worse examples in late model JVCs. Gray and white field uniformity was excellent with the lens aperture in the upper two thirds of it’s range, with a just barely perceptible green shift to the right. However, the green shift became much more visible at or below an aperture setting of -11, so even with small or high gain screens staying at or above -10 may be advisable.

Focus was superb over most of the screen, reminding me strongly of JVC’s excellent RS4500, though the bottom right was slightly softer.

Before calibration:

Familiar scenes in Lucy looked great in the HDR10 picture mode, with excellent highights and definition. The picture was extremely punchy and dynamic. The Active Tone Mapping appeared to be working very well, although my unusually bright setup does not provide much of a challenge for it. Shadow detail was surprisingly strong, perhaps a bit too much for this movie which normally crushes near black detail. Blacks within the movie frame were slightly elevated, causing the 2.40 movie frame to glow. This is not a byproduct of the RS3000’s contrast; rather, it is caused by the factory calibration jumping out of black too fast. Otherwise, the blacks looked excellent. Colors were very pleasing on Lucy, but checking my reference images showed the out of the box HDR color to be somewhat on the pale side. Watching First Man on 4K HDR Blu Ray for the first time was not nearly as satisfying, lacking in definition and appearing excessively grainy, though it appears the projector was just displaying flaws in the movie.

Watching a bit of normal 1080P TV shows before calibration was very enjoyable; the image was powerful and very much like a large, high quality flat panel. The only distraction were some skin tones and brown shades that seemed a bit violet or lavender.
Conclusion:

The RS3000 is a significant advancement in many ways over JVC’s previous models, which is saying a lot. Native 4K resolution and excellent focus give fantastic detail. The improvements in the Dynamic Iris are significant, and make it a very useful enhancement that can be used without reservation. Even though the measured contrast numbers were not as strong as other recent lamp based JVCs, the DI improvement minimized or made up for any visible contrast difference in my situation. The RS3000’s image reminded me of JVC’s much more expensive RS4500, and it’s time in my home theater was amazingly satisfying.
Thanks Chad, I hope the lower end projectors such as the NX5 measure up as well.
Chad B likes this.

Clark
Clark Burk is offline  
post #5129 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 04:57 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Manni01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 9,014
Mentioned: 310 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5361 Post(s)
Liked: 5421
Thanks Chad for this very detailed, very through and very useful review!

Interesting how opinions on the DI seem to differ. I have exactly the same issues you mention with the DI implementation on older models, especially in HDR with the iris fully open, so I’m really hoping that my experience will be similar to yours in this area on the rs2000.

Disappointing to hear the issues with the Autocal, I’ll report on this in the new thread. Hopefully JVC will resolve this quickly.

Looking forward to looking at your measurements when I’m back on a PC.

Thanks again!
Clark Burk and Chad B like this.

JVC Autocal Software V11 Calibration for 2019 Models (Google)
Batch Utility V4.02 May 16 2019 to automate measurements files for madVR with support for BD Folders
Manni01 is online now  
post #5130 of 14110 Old 02-09-2019, 05:18 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
JeffR1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,670
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1055 Post(s)
Liked: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post
CMD did increase motion resolution, but at the expense of introducing the much scorned Soap Opera Effect. The last item in the Motion Control submenu, Motion Enhance, did not increase real motion resolution but did slightly exaggerate sharpness of the motion resolution that was already resolved. There did not seem to be any significant difference in motion handling between the RS3000 and other recent JVCs with normal film and TV content, although admittedly serious sports fans sometimes notice differences that escape me in this regard.
So how do you increase motion resolution with out increasing the scorned Soap Opera Effect ???
You can't have one with out the other...
You make it sound like a disease !
JeffR1 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Digital Hi-End Projectors - $3,000+ USD MSRP

Tags
Jvc , nx7 , nx9 , rs2000 , rs3000

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off