Grounding antenna masts and coax cable - Page 3 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #61 of 131 Old 02-29-2016, 11:25 AM
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FWIW, grounding jut the coax outer conductor does not usually ground the whole system since often, the mast and antenna elements are electrically isolated from the coax.
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post #62 of 131 Old 03-05-2016, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Phane View Post
I'm having an installer come by to move my antenna from my attic to my roof in a few days. When they did the estimate, they said that they can run the existing coax in my attic through a roof vent and ground it with a grounding block to the ground from my main junction box in the basement (where the pre-amp's power inserter is anyway). I asked if the mast itself needs to be grounded as well (the guides I've read have you grounding both) and the installer told me no. They said it's state code in Minnesota that you only have to ground the coax and it doesn't need to be grounded outside and that grounding the coax grounds the whole system anyway.

Is this installer giving me the runaround or is only grounding the coax to my junction boxes ground wire adequate?
NEC Code mandates that the Coax Downlead go through a COAX GROUND BLOCK, when connects the outer Coax Shield to "Ground" [usually the Metal Box containing the Electrical Circuit Breakers, which is in turn connected to 120/240 VAC "SAFETY" Ground]. When there is sufficient Voltage (100++ volts....NOT specified), Static Electricity buildup on the "Antenna" will be dissipated in an Arc across the Gap in the Ground Block. In the event of an actual Lightning HIT, the Coax, Ground Block and Ground Wires act as the "Path of Least Resistance" to hopefully "guide" the ionization trail along the exterior of the House, where it hopefully causes the least damage.

In the various OUTDOOR Baluns that I have measured (e.g. Channel-Master, Philips, RCA), the 300-ohm Twin-Leads have DC Connectivity to the 75-ohm Coax SHIELD [NOT found in most INDOOR Baluns]. Hence, this ensures that the Static Electricity on the ACTIVE Antenna Elements has a low-resistance path to GROUND. HOWEVER, note that the PASSIVE Antenna Elements, as well as the Reflector and Mast (i.e nearly ALL of the Antenna structure) does NOT have a path to Ground, except via a Separate Ground Wire connected to (at least) the Antenna Mast.

So JUST using a Coax Ground Block at the House Entry Point is NOT ADEQUATE to protect against Lightning....the MAST (as a minimum) needs to ALSO be connected to "Ground"....and should be as SHORT AS POSSIBLE, WELL AWAY from the House if possible, since it will carry MOST of the Dissipated Current. Note that most Reflector Systems and Yagi Booms (incl. directly attached Passive Reflector & Directors) are firmly mounted and hence have Electrical Connectivity to the MAST...so they also are "Grounded". Indeed the only Ungrounded parts of an Antenna occur in some DIY Implementations that use PVC or Fibreglass mounting systems.....but as long as the nearby MAST is Grounded, they should be good to go. Also recognize that since the ACTIVE Element(s) in most Antennas is SMALL (and surrounded by) the much LARGER Passive Elements, BOOM (if used) and Supporting MAST....so the Coax Ground Path only has to dissipate a relatively SMALL portion of the TOTAL Static Electricity Buildup.

PS: Static Electricity Buildup on the Antenna and Mast is caused by HIGH WINDS, just like shuffling your feet across the Carpet. Static Electricity Buildup can ATTRACT nearby Lightning Strikes, depending on the relative POLARITY and Magnitude of Antenna and Cloud Charge buildups.....

BTW: Last year, the SAT Installers submitted a change to the National NEC Code which would no longer require Grounding SAT Dishes...their argument was that since they were mounted low on a House's Ledgerboard, the Dishes were no bigger a problem than the Metal Vent Pipes from Heaters and Plumbing systems. The change did NOT get into the latest version...so their argument fell flat....as it should, since many SAT Dishes are mounted at or close to the highest point on SOME Houses.

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post #63 of 131 Old 03-15-2016, 12:53 AM
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Grounding for apartment dwellers

My current setup has the antenna on an enclosed balcony but more and more I'm seeing people in my area with antennas on open balconies or poking out of open windows.

What options do apartment dwellers have for protecting themselves from lightning or wind-induced static? How can we properly ground?
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post #64 of 131 Old 03-15-2016, 02:25 PM
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What options do apartment dwellers have for protecting themselves from lightning or wind-induced static? How can we properly ground?
I think the most important thing you should do is to ground the coax shield with a grounding block that is connected to the house electrical system ground, no matter where the antenna is located. This is to protect you from electrical shock because your antenna is connected to AC operated equipment that has leakage current even when operating properly. I have had three close calls with electrical shock. For example:
http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/81-o...ml#post1457594
http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/81-o...ml#post1457668

If you don't have access to the house electrical system ground, you can use a known good ground like a copper water pipe that comes from underground or the grounding pin of a three wire outlet.

If your antenna is on a covered balcony, I don't see any static charge buildup hazard. Antennas that are on an open balcony are at small risk as indicated by the NEC requirement. The easiest way to ground them is to use a non-approved shortcut called the piggy-back method used by dish installers. This method uses coax that has an added messenger wire of 17 gauge copper clad steel. The 17 gauge wire connects to the mast of the antenna to drain the static charge. At the lower end, the messenger and the coax shield are grounded.

Satellite System Grounding
Part 2 - NEC Overview
Presented by Todd Humphrey
http://www.dbsinstall.com/diy/Grounding-2.asp

Todd Humphrey doesn't speak for the NFPA that publishes the NEC code, but he has some ideas that are helpful. The local electrical inspector has the final say if you are willing to get him involved. Some inspectors are more friendly than others; a local electrician could tell you.

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post #65 of 131 Old 03-15-2016, 03:26 PM
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What about surge protectors/UPS units that have coax protection? Will that at least drain the static off through the unit's 3 prong plug? Trying to think of options that don't involve going across the apartment to the nearest pipe.

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post #66 of 131 Old 03-15-2016, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by dheian View Post
What about surge protectors/UPS units that have coax protection? Will that at least drain the static off through the unit's 3 prong plug?
Good question.

The surge protector strips that have coax connectors WILL ground the coax shield, but they have been known to degrade the TV signals. The coax surge protector in the strips has a device that is connected between the center conductor and the shield of the coax, and the center conductor is close to the AC lines so that it can pick up interference. I would rather connect the separate coax grounding block to the grounding pin socket of the 3-wire receptacle on the strip, using just the grounding pin of a 3-wire plug.

That is similar to what I did with my test setup that had enough leakage current that I could feel it. I used my 4-way splitter as a grounding block and connected it to the grounding pin of a 3-wire plug that was inserted into a known properly wired 3-wire receptacle.
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...ic/hsehld.html

A grounding block (called an ADU in the NEC) is essentially an F81 adapter with a way to connect it to ground. There is nothing connected between the center conductor and the shield as there is in coax surge protectors.


If the antenna is outside, the coax shield should be grounded with a grounding block that is connected to the house electrical system ground with 10 gauge copper wire for electrical safety and to reject interference. For further compliance with the electrical code (NEC), the mast should also be grounded in a similar manner to drain any buildup of static charge, but the system will not survive a direct strike.



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post #67 of 131 Old 03-16-2016, 12:24 PM
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Draining off the static is the responsibility of the mast ground, to supposedly make it a less inviting target to lightning. Grounding the coax outer shield is done to minimize the fire hazard that would otherwise develop if something shorted to the coax and made it electrically hot. Ignoring the letter of the NEC and speaking practically, rounding the shield does no ordinarily tend to drain off static on the antenna because the antenna is most often electrically isolated from the coax, the most common exception being log periodic antennas.

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post #68 of 131 Old 03-17-2016, 03:03 PM
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Unlike most INDOOR Baluns, in the OUTDOOR Baluns that I have measured (Channel-Master, Philips, RCA), the 300-ohm Twin-Leads have DC Continuity to the Shield of the 75-ohm Coax....hence Static Electricity Build-up in most Log-Periodic Elements (e.g. HD-769x, HBU-xxx, et.al.) will be drained off via the Coax at the Ground Block. In HD-769x Series, the Hi-VHF Elements are interconnected in pairs, with each connected directly forward to the UHF Folded Dipole, to which the Balun connects. I would hope that the new PCB (Printed Circuit Board) Baluns also provide DC Continuity...which they SHOULD inherently do as part of the Parallel Transmission Line Topography.

PASSIVE Yagi Elements (Reflectors and Directors) are typically connected directly to the Boom, and hence must have Static Electricity Build-Up drained via the Mast Ground....Ditto Bow-tie Reflector Assemblies attached to the Mast.

Re Apartment/Condo Balcony Antennas....Lightning is attracted to the HIGHEST point....so unless you are on one of the top floors, quit worrying so much [Q: Is there even a NEC Requirement???].....and BTW: there is probably a nearby Power Outlet that you can connect to using one of those 3-Prong to 2-Prong+Ground-Wire Adapters....

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post #69 of 131 Old 03-17-2016, 04:04 PM
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My limit experience with measuring baluns for through continuity was the opposite. I found that the indoor ones I checked that looked like Tootsie Roll midgies with twinlead had thru-continuity but the fatter ones with solid wire leads did not. The one design "indoor" balun I found that always did have isolation were the push-on ones with the two tiny screws and serrated penetrating washers intended to interface FM, "T" antennas to 75 ohm female chassis connectors, but you wouldn't believe the frequency response of some of them. They weren't engineered for UHF frequencies and rolled off brutally above maybe 500 MHz.
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post #70 of 131 Old 04-17-2016, 10:51 PM
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Why can't the coax and mast ground share the same wire to the grounding rod?
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post #71 of 131 Old 04-18-2016, 08:03 AM
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They can and often do, but it doesn't meet the NEC specifications.

If the antenna is outside, the coax shield should be grounded with a grounding block that is connected to the house electrical system ground with 10 gauge copper wire for electrical safety and to reject interference. For further compliance with the electrical code (NEC), the mast should also be grounded with a separate 10 gauge copper wire or 17 gauge copper clad steel wire to drain any buildup of static charge, but the system will not survive a direct strike.



There is an alternate method used by dish installers, called the "piggy-back" method, but it doesn't meet code. It uses coax that has an attached 17 gauge copper clad steel messenger wire. That coax runs from the antenna to the grounding block, with the grounding block connected to the house electrical system ground with 10 gauge copper wire. The steel wire runs from the mast to the grounding block.

Satellite System Grounding
Part 2 - NEC Overview
Presented by Todd Humphrey

http://www.dbsinstall.com/diy/Grounding-2.asp

Todd Humphrey doesn't speak for the NFPA that publishes the NEC code, but he has some ideas that are helpful. The local electrical inspector (AHJ, authority having jurisdiction) has the final say if you are willing to get him involved. Some inspectors are more friendly than others; a local electrician could tell you.
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post #72 of 131 Old 04-18-2016, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by rabbit73 View Post
They can and often do, but it doesn't meet the NEC specifications.

If the antenna is outside, the coax shield should be grounded with a grounding block that is connected to the house electrical system ground with 10 gauge copper wire for electrical safety and to reject interference. For further compliance with the electrical code (NEC), the mast should also be grounded with a separate 10 gauge copper wire or 17 gauge copper clad steel wire to drain any buildup of static charge, but the system will not survive a direct strike.



There is an alternate method used by dish installers, called the "piggy-back" method, but it doesn't meet code. It uses coax that has an attached 17 gauge copper clad steel messenger wire. That coax runs from the antenna to the grounding block, with the grounding block connected to the house electrical system ground with 10 gauge copper wire. The steel wire runs from the mast to the grounding block.

Satellite System Grounding
Part 2 - NEC Overview
Presented by Todd Humphrey

http://www.dbsinstall.com/diy/Grounding-2.asp

Todd Humphrey doesn't speak for the NFPA that publishes the NEC code, but he has some ideas that are helpful. The local electrical inspector (AHJ, authority having jurisdiction) has the final say if you are willing to get him involved. Some inspectors are more friendly than others; a local electrician could tell you.
Thank you for that info. I originally piggy back my coax and mast ground but a friend of mine who is an electrician separated them when I had him inspect my work. He said they way I had it is common practice and probably OK but he likes do things by the book. I just wanted to only have one wire running down the side of my house to the grounding rod.
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post #73 of 131 Old 04-27-2016, 04:24 PM
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I can't say for a fact that the "piggy-back" mast ground wire connection path necessarily does not meet code. The code gets revised every three years, and the last version I bought was 2008. I did download a pre-publication, developmental copy of the 2014 version but can't find it.

I think that starting in 2008, the path that the mast ground wire ran became more stringently defined, as I think that was the year they put ill-conceived length limits on it, which were sometimes physically impossible to meet. Based on what I knew the principles of mast grounding to be and to believe them to have become, I think that if the 17 gauge messenger wire was spliced using the coax ground block, that might under some circumstances be code compliant, provided that the resultant, mast ground wire path was compliantly short and straight.
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post #74 of 131 Old 01-21-2017, 05:09 PM
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post #75 of 131 Old 03-08-2017, 04:26 PM
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Need Help Grounding Antenna Cable

Outdoor Antenna. I'm going to put a antenna on my old Direct tv dish mast. The Direct tv cable runs into my house And is properly grounded
I am putting a winegard amp and a splitter on the antenna so I can run a second tv off the antenna. The second tv cable will be on the roof And I'll put it thru the wall into the room. Room is on second story. My house has steel siding if that's any help
My question is, how do I ground the second tv cable?
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post #76 of 131 Old 03-08-2017, 07:48 PM
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There is no need to.
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post #77 of 131 Old 03-09-2017, 08:04 AM
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post #78 of 131 Old 03-09-2017, 10:29 AM
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Each antenna lead going into the house is supposed to be grounded as near as possible to the point at which to enters the house, which is pretty fuzzy. If you simply attach a ground wire to the outdoor splitter, then that grounds both leads, but whether that can reasonably be construed to meet the code for grounding coax outer conductors depends on how far the distance is from the splitter to each wall penetration.

As has been written here many times, the only reason that most installers ground antenna leads is so that they won't be financially penalized by their employer for not having grounded them.
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post #79 of 131 Old 09-02-2017, 05:51 PM
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Running ground wire over roof to the edge

Hello,
I'm hoping to install a chimney mounted Antenna/Mast (Raleigh, NC). The chimney is not on the side of the house. The chimney comes up through a roof (there is a covered porch that surrounds the chimney, so to all sides of the chimney are roof). So, I'd have to run the coax and the ground wire across a portion of the roof (resting on the roof) to get an edge where I could then go down to ground rod. Is this possible? I thought part of the point of grounding was to not touch the house (otherwise a lighting strike could "leave" the ground wire and go into the house. I have searched this and other forums and have not found an answer. I don't know the model of the antenna, I inherited it, it's a basic outdoor mast mounted antenna. Thank you in advance. Tim
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post #80 of 131 Old 09-02-2017, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by giambra View Post
Hello,
I'm hoping to install a chimney mounted Antenna/Mast (Raleigh, NC). The chimney is not on the side of the house. The chimney comes up through a roof (there is a covered porch that surrounds the chimney, so to all sides of the chimney are roof). So, I'd have to run the coax and the ground wire across a portion of the roof (resting on the roof) to get an edge where I could then go down to ground rod. Is this possible? I thought part of the point of grounding was to not touch the house (otherwise a lighting strike could "leave" the ground wire and go into the house. I have searched this and other forums and have not found an answer. I don't know the model of the antenna, I inherited it, it's a basic outdoor mast mounted antenna. Thank you in advance. Tim
Yes, it is OK to do that. Ground wires are commonly stapled to the house. Try to make the ground wire run as direct as possible, avoiding any extra or sharp bends, if possible.
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post #81 of 131 Old 10-13-2017, 01:16 AM
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Does the electrical grounding of the mast not attract more lightning?
I'm sorry for bad English
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post #82 of 131 Old 10-13-2017, 08:39 AM
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Does the electrical grounding of the mast not attract more lightning?
I'm sorry for bad English
No, since the grounded mast is then at the same electrical potential as the ground.
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post #83 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 06:55 AM
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Does connecting the grounding block for the cable TV to the exterior of the electric meter using a corner clamp (or similar see picture) provide a proper ground if the pipes from the meter to the ground are PVC?
I ask because the HDMI ports on a TV and several receivers were damaged during a lightening storm. Nothing else was damaged which leads me to believe the cable was the source.
I've done a fair bit of reading on the topic including NEC Overview by Todd Humphrey but I'm in a fight with the insurance company over coverage and I'm not entirely clear if the metal meter housing is grounded if PVC pipes are used from the ground to the meter.
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post #84 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 07:52 AM
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Exclamation

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Originally Posted by Siriustoo View Post
Does connecting the grounding block for the cable TV to the exterior of the electric meter using a corner clamp (or similar see picture) provide a proper ground if the pipes from the meter to the ground are PVC?
Who did that??? An electrician?? I hope not! If so report them to the state and/or local licensing board! NOW!

The local MSO installer??? That looks like a standard 1A thing from the Knight Industries playbook in this area.

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Originally Posted by Siriustoo View Post
I ask because the HDMI ports on a TV and several receivers were damaged during a lightening storm. Nothing else was damaged which leads me to believe the cable was the source.
I've done a fair bit of reading on the topic including NEC Overview by Todd Humphrey but I'm in a fight with the insurance company over coverage and I'm not entirely clear if the metal meter housing is grounded if PVC pipes are used from the ground to the meter.
You more than likely will loose that claim. IMPROPER INSTALLATION. Your best to start a civil complaint against who ever did that install.

You should have a ground rod with #10 or better wire, running into the box to connect to the ground wires of the electric system.

You should then have a ground block that runs back to that same ground rod from your OTA, DBS, and/or cable as applicable.

PVC pipes do not conduct, so they are not a substitute for the ground wire, and that mess in that photo... is so many wrongs, I don't know where to start.

Sorry you have an issue, but this is why you do things correctly or your claims will be denied by insurance companies. You would have to fight them any way... Standard SOP.. deny, deny, deny. GET A LAWYER! As much as I hate them, you have to fight slease with slease and more slease! LAWYER! Thats what the insurance companies hope you don't do! Any settlement.. cost of replacement, and ALL LEGAL FEES, ABOVE AND BEYOND any settlement offers. They pay you, they pay your slearsers separately.. So if this say a contingency basis.. and the sleasers want 30%, then the insurance company pays 130%.

Notice: I no longer provide assistance in re OTA antenna and RF related queries.
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post #85 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 08:06 AM
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Good question. There was never a ground rod in the install. The meters were replaced when I installed a solar system. I think the electricians who did the solar upgrade just reconnected that ground connector to the new meters.
Does this mean that the meter box is not grounded internally?
Nothing surprises me any more. We have such a housing boom in Canada that sloppy contractors are booked solid for 6 months.
My fishing buddy just told me he has time for fishing since the foundation guy for new house he was building used fine gravel for the weeping bed, and blocked all the drainage pipes... failed city inspection and now has to be dug out.
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post #86 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 08:26 AM
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The clamp is an approved device, but its use assumes that the enclosure will be grounded. If PVC conduit is used with the enclosure, the enclosure will not be grounded unless there is a grounding conductor in the conduit that is connected to the house electrical system ground.

For your safety, I hope the house electrical system is properly grounded.

If the enclosure is grounded, and if the clamp makes good contact with the enclosure (through the paint), the coax is grounded.

Todd Humphrey doesn't speak for the NFPA that publishes the NEC code, but he has some ideas that are helpful. The local electrical inspector (AHJ, authority having jurisdiction) has the final say if you are willing to get him involved. Some inspectors are more friendly than others; a local electrician could tell you if that method is approved.
http://www.dbsinstall.com/diy/Grounding-2.asp

Quote:
I ask because the HDMI ports on a TV and several receivers were damaged during a lightening storm. Nothing else was damaged which leads me to believe the cable was the source.
HDMI ports are sensitive to damage, even with a properly grounded system. If I have a choice, I favor the component connection over HDMI.

If all of your equipment has 2-wire AC power cords, it might not be properly grounded. If one device has a 3-wire AC power cord that is properly grounded, the rest of the equipment is also grounded through the shields of the connected cables.

All AC operated equipment has leakage current, even when operating properly. For you personal safety, your system should be grounded to avoid electrical shock.


Case history of leakage current with converter box:
http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/81-o...ml#post1457594


http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/81-o...ml#post1457668

If you can not measure it, you can not improve it.
Lord Kelvin, 1883
www.megalithia.com/elect/aerialsite/dttpoorman.html

Last edited by rabbit73; 10-14-2017 at 09:06 AM.
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post #87 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 10:47 AM
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Exclamation

[quote=Siriustoo;54951970]Good question. There was never a ground rod in the install. [quote]





Quote:
Originally Posted by Siriustoo View Post
The meters were replaced when I installed a solar system. I think the electricians who did the solar upgrade just reconnected that ground connector to the new meters.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Siriustoo View Post
Does this mean that the meter box is not grounded internally?

With out being there physically, or photos lots off photos ...who knows...

I am going ASS u ME that it passed the local "hydro" (you canucks! ) inspection from local regulatory agency(s).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Siriustoo View Post
Nothing surprises me any more. We have such a housing boom in Canada that sloppy contractors are booked solid for 6 months.
I do know that I've seen things done by local contractors here for MSO, HSD installs, that would get them fired... They hate HATE seeing me... I will stand there and watch them... I've learned that is the only way to get this stuff done to my specs and done right. They try and pawn off their networking and other BS features on unsuspecting users... modems in non bridge mode... URGGGGHHHH..

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit73 View Post
The clamp is an approved device,
Not approved here, just checked with a licensed electrician.. NOPE. FAIL. Obviously that my be different... in CA... but

with a PVC pipe with who knows whats in it.. I think there is a big potential for a possible issue here.

My electric service comes in a PVC electric conduit... There is then a ground wire to a ground rod that comes out the meter box. Everything is right, nice, and close to this so I can tie into that ground quick and easy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit73 View Post
but its use assumes that the enclosure will be grounded. If PVC conduit is used with the enclosure, the enclosure will not be grounded unless there is a grounding conductor in the conduit that is connected to the house electrical system ground.
That was the comment that I got... IF IF IF.. yeah sure then you have a ground that meets NEC... . but per the code in this area, nope.. that wouldn't fly... Immediate failure, stop work order, remove it, come back and get another inspection.

I can also tell you right now that the reason the insurance company is not going to cover that, is that install... One of my side jobs for things, is insurance underwriting inspections... Something like that if I passed it screams.. PROBLEM... I snap a photo, note it on the report. underwriting reviews it.. May send you a letter, fix, and submit proof of fix and approval by licensed electrician and/or local building inspector.. you get bound.. Ignore it or not fix it.. . No coverage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit73 View Post
For your safety, I hope the house electrical system is properly grounded.

If the enclosure is grounded, and if the clamp makes good contact with the enclosure (through the paint), the coax is grounded.
I think who ever did that solar upgrade better be checked out...

Notice: I no longer provide assistance in re OTA antenna and RF related queries.
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post #88 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 12:53 PM
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The Electrical Safety Authority does inspections in Ontario. Costs $175 and I have had 3.
The first one was to replace my main panel that almost caught fire in my two year old house. Was out of town at the time so not sure what they did.
Second inspection the guy parked in the driveway, filled out the report and left.
Third inspection was for the Solar Panel. They guy did not want to wait around for the electricians to finish so he asked them what they were going to do, he said that was ok, gave them the safety sticker and left.
Now you know why I have two smoke detectors (one battery operated) on every level of my house.
Good thing it was a 9 year old plasma TV and two older receivers that got toasted.
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post #89 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 01:26 PM
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That's quite a history of disaster.

Even with a perfect installation according to code, lightning will go where it wants to go.

We had a close strike that took out my computer. The computer was off, it was plugged in to a surge suppressor (Tripp Lite Isobar), and the surge suppressor switch was off.

The old 20-inch Sony CRT TV in the living room survived, but the colors were weird. I turned the TV off and then on again. I heard the normal "thunk" of the degausser, and the colors were back to normal. The shadow mask had been magnetized by the EMP of the strike.

I now unplug the power strip during storm season when not in use.

If you can not measure it, you can not improve it.
Lord Kelvin, 1883
www.megalithia.com/elect/aerialsite/dttpoorman.html

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post #90 of 131 Old 10-14-2017, 05:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siriustoo View Post
Good thing it was a 9 year old plasma TV and two older receivers that got toasted.
Were they connected to a surge suppressor strip that was properly grounded?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TampBayOTA View Post
Not approved here, just checked with a licensed electrician.. NOPE. FAIL. Obviously that my be different... in CA... but
Just because a clamp is "listed" doesn't mean an inspector is required to "approve" its use.



Quote:
The PVSC51CFUL is an NEC approved ground clamp used to attach the ground wire to the meter box. The binding screw penetrates the paint of the meter box. Use in conjunction with other grounding supplies to protect against power surges and lightning strikes. Works excellently for grounding residential cable as well as satellite television systems and for grounding off-air antennas. UL approved.

Features
DIRECTV Approved
UL listed device. For coax entry point grounding connections
No drilling required to connect this device
Made from Copper Clad Steel


Quote:
The Senior Industries SI-2167SLM-WL is engineered to provide an electrical ground connection to customer meter boxes without the need for a ground rod, ground rod clamp or long ground wire runs.

Features:
Patented screw design (cone and tip arrangement) for intimate ground to base metal
No preparation of meter box surface required
No need to loosen clamp to attach or remove ground wires
UL and CUL listed
Patented
DIRECTV Approved


The latest method is the IBTB, Intersystem Bonding Termination Bar, which provides grounding connections for many services and a lay-in connection for the house grounding conductor, which must not be disconnected when in use.



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If you can not measure it, you can not improve it.
Lord Kelvin, 1883
www.megalithia.com/elect/aerialsite/dttpoorman.html

Last edited by rabbit73; 10-14-2017 at 08:42 PM.
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