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post #1 of 124 Old 09-30-2014, 12:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Grounding antenna masts and coax cable

I am attempting to cut the cord and got myself an Antennas Direct Clearstream 2 antenna. I also got a 10ft galvanized fence pole from Lowes and cut it down to 8ft to use as a mast. I mounted the antenna at the apex of my roof on the end side of the highest decorative eave post (I believe it's called an outlooker). Similar to the brown posts in this picture: http://www.fauxwoodbeams.com/blog/wp...outlooker4.jpg. So my antenna is about 1ft away from the actual roof of the house.

Reception is great in my tests and now I am figuring out how I should ground everything. The coax cable runs to the box where I have a grounding block in there already in use for cable internet. This leads me to a couple of questions that I hope somebody can answer:

1. I'm looking to get a dual grounding block to share between the cable internet (which uses the single grounding block already there that came with the house) and the antenna. Any concerns with doing this?

2. I noticed that dual grounding blocks have two ground connections. Would I need to connect both grounds on the block?

3. Is it even necessary to ground my puny antenna and mast? I have a single story house and the top of my antenna is at the roofline height of my neighbors two-story house 20ft away. We get maybe one mild thunderstorm a year (bay area California). In my (naiive) mind I picture lighting striking the antenna and the decorative outlooker just falling off with the antenna and not causing major damage to the house.

4. If I must ground the antenna mast, can I run a ground wire along with the coax line into the same ground block that the coax/cable internet uses? That's the closest pre-existing ground source and is about a 50ft run.

Thanks in advance.

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post #2 of 124 Old 09-30-2014, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by 195 View Post

1. I'm looking to get a dual grounding block to share between the cable internet (which uses the single grounding block already there that came with the house) and the antenna. Any concerns with doing this?
No concerns

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2. I noticed that dual grounding blocks have two ground connections. Would I need to connect both grounds on the block?
You wouldn't necessarily need to. Back when I used to be current on the details of the code, it said that the coax grounding conductor had to be approximately equal in current carrying capability to the coax cable outer conductors it was grounding, but in no case could it be less than 14 gauge. Cable companies commonly used 12 gauge solid to ground one RG-6 coax. But when a block is used to ground two coax cables, they have collectively twice the current carrying capability as one, so you would theoretically need twice the current carrying capability of your ground connection wire or wires to satisfy that, and that capacity is most easily met by running two ground wires. Alternatively, you could use one six gauge ground wire, but that is more difficult to obtain. Similarly, the big blocks that simultaneously ground four coaxes commonly have four ground wire attachment holes.

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3. Is it even necessary to ground my puny antenna and mast? I have a single story house and the top of my antenna is at the roofline height of my neighbors two-story house 20ft away. We get maybe one mild thunderstorm a year (bay area California).
Not really. Grounds specified by the NEC are for safety purposes. In an antenna system, they theoretically tend to drain off static charge from an antenna that supposedly would otherwise make it more inviting to lightning, and the coax outer conductor ground is supposed to better assure that voltage that is on that outer shield it shunted to ground, rather than entering the house, where it could be a shock or fire hazard. I believe that coax ground is more useful in grounding the kind of voltage that might be incurred if a loose power line made contact with your antenna system.

There are no grounding police to find and penalize a nonconforming grounded antenna system. So-called installation professionals usually ground in accordance with code so that they will not be subsequently penalized by their employer for not having done so.

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4. If I must ground the antenna mast, can I run a ground wire along with the coax line into the same ground block that the coax/cable internet uses? That's the closest pre-existing ground source and is about a 50ft run.
We all do that. Under some real rigid interpretations of the code, that might flunk the principles that the mast ground be as short and direct as possible, or that it not go laterally more than some specified distance without first being connected to its own 8' earth ground rod,, but frankly, that is one aspect of grounding code compliance that even the most finicky of installers choose to ignore. You can get coax that has 17 gauge copper clad steel ground wire attached to it and have that mast ground wire go into one hole of your "Siamese" ground block, and use the other ground wire hole for your earth ground and your antenna installation will be grounded as well as about 99% of all antenna installations

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post #3 of 124 Old 09-30-2014, 05:28 PM
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Going to stick this since it comes up a lot. Thread is open and all additional advice is welcome so we have a rough FAQ.

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post #4 of 124 Old 10-01-2014, 11:46 AM - Thread Starter
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Thank you Mike for the detailed explanation and the peace of mind. I went ahead and ordered a dual ground block (Holland GRB-2THR-UL) and a coax cable with a 17awg copper ground attached to it (http://prowirecommunications.com/store/product3.html). I had trouble finding a name-brand cable that offered less than 1000ft rolls of this stuff. Since it's an outdoor run, I can easily replace it if it fails.

In summary, I'll have three grounds routing through the ground block:
1. The coax cable from the street that provides cable internet
2. The coax cable from the antenna that provides OTA channels
3. The ground wire attached to the antenna coax which fastens to the antenna mast

One other thing I forgot to mention is that I have a small signal amplifier/splitter for the antenna in the same area as the ground block (http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Amplif...Signal+Booster). If I connect this after the ground block, do I still need to ground it? In terms of grounding (or not grounding), where would be the optimal place for the amplifier?

Thanks again!
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post #5 of 124 Old 10-01-2014, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 195 View Post
...I have a small signal amplifier/splitter for the antenna in the same area as the ground block (http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Amplif...Signal+Booster). If I connect this after the ground block, do I still need to ground it? In terms of grounding (or not grounding), where would be the optimal place for the amplifier?
If that amplifier is located indoors, then it definitely doesn't need to be grounded. If it is outdoors, then it does raise the fuzzy issue of what it means to ground each coax as near as possible to the point where it(they) enter(s) the building.

It seems that the satellite TV installation companies have concluded to their own satisfaction that when their similar multiport amplification and switching devices are located outside the house but are grounded, that grounded case serves the same purpose as a grounding block.

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post #6 of 124 Old 10-04-2014, 11:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntAltMike View Post
It seems that the satellite TV installation companies have concluded to their own satisfaction that when their similar amplification and switching devices are located outside the house but are grounded, that grounded case serves the same purpose as a grounding block.
many are UL listed for that very purpose, but it sounds like he has the option to put it after the ground block in which case it does not need to be grounded. I prefer using proper ground blocks.. just for the permanence of them. then any changes are done instead with patch cables at the cost of -1dB.

I had a chance to discuss this with an electrical engineer but it got kinda iffy because they might not be that familiar with the anatomy of the antenna. In my case I was switching him from Directv to Dish and I was not the original Directv installer. There was no ground wire attached to the dish and the splitter at the home run was grounded. The debate was whether or not that was sufficient. In reality it doesn't matter much since the odds of lightning in his case were negligible, so if I was going to ground at all, I would ground it properly. An important physical difference between a D* dish and a E* dish is that the LNB is clamped directly to the dish itself, while E* dishes attach the LNB using a plastic bracket thus isolating the coax ground from the actual dish. I ran new cable to the dish with a messenger ground wire that was grounded at the service entrance outside rather than the main grounding electrode at the breaker panel.

I think professional installers are more often proponents of grounding than skeptics, but you'd probably know if you were at high risk of lightning based on the storms you've observed in the past. If you end up grounding it, then just keep the ground wire shorter than the coax run and just like AntAltMike suggested, use a #17 copper clad messenger wire. It's what the pros are using.
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post #7 of 124 Old 10-05-2014, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by acesat View Post
many are UL listed for that very purpose, but it sounds like he has the option to put it after the ground block in which case it does not need to be grounded. I prefer using proper ground blocks.. just for the permanence of them. then any changes are done instead with patch cables at the cost of -1dB.
But the thing is, "the code" requires the coax downleads to be grounded as near as possible to the point at which they enter the house, so whether the coax gets to a grounded distribution splitter or switch, there is still some distance from those output ports to the point at which each enters the house. This is one of many fuzzy issues regarding code grounding requirement definitions, namely, are the coaxes that go from an external, multiport amplifier or splitter or SWM unit actually antenna leads? Last time I checked, the code did not explicitly say, but I haven't really scrutinized the two most recent revisions.

Quote:
I had a chance to discuss this with an electrical engineer but it got kinda iffy because they might not be that familiar with the anatomy of the antenna. In my case I was switching him from Directv to Dish and I was not the original Directv installer. There was no ground wire attached to the dish and the splitter at the home run was grounded. The debate was whether or not that was sufficient. In reality it doesn't matter much since the odds of lightning in his case were negligible, so if I was going to ground at all, I would ground it properly. An important physical difference between a D* dish and a E* dish is that the LNB is clamped directly to the dish itself, while E* dishes attach the LNB using a plastic bracket thus isolating the coax ground from the actual dish.
One point I keep making here, if for no other reason than that a lot of grounding commentary gradually gets buried, is that there are several different reasons that one grounds antenna systems. One is that doing so is supposed to enhance fire and shock safety, another is to attempt to protect consumer electronic equipment from surge damage, and a third, but the most important to so-called installation professionals, is so that they will not be penalized by their employer for not having installed in compliance with code when they were paid to do so. And many have expressed the concern here that their insurance requires it.

While I understand your conclusion that an LNB whose flange physically contacts a dish theoretically develops a conductive path from the mast to the coax outer shield, that does not satisfy the explicit mandate of the code and therefore a DirecTV or DISH Network system installer is not supposed to satisfy the grounding requirement that way. Furthermore, since the LNB support tube has a painted surface, it would not meet any accepted practice standards for attaching a ground wire or completing a ground path because its conductivity would be suspect.

Insofar as insurance liability is concerned, in the decade and a half in which I have participated in thousands of discussions on grounding, I have never once received a credible, verifiable report of an insurance company either refusing to pay a claim or using its subrogation right to sue an installer for recoup of any insurance payment it has made to an insured customer who had incurred damage to their improperly grounded antenna system.

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post #8 of 124 Old 10-05-2014, 11:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntAltMike View Post
But the thing is, "the code" requires the coax downleads to be grounded as near as possible to the point at which they enter the house, so whether the coax gets to a grounded distribution splitter or switch, there is still some distance from those output ports to the point at which each enters the house. This is one of many fuuzzy issues regarding code grounding requirement definitions, namely, are the coaxes that go from an external, multiport amplifier or splitter or SWM unit actually antenna leads? Last time I checked, the code did not explicitly say, but I haven't really scrutinized the two most recent revisions.



One point I keep making here, if for no other reason than that a lot of grounding commentary gradually gets buried, is that there are several different reasons that one grounds antenna systems. One is that doing so is supposed to assure fire and shock safety, another is to attempt to protect consumer electronic equipment from surge damage, and a third, but the most important to so-called installation professionals, is so that they will not be penalized by their employer for not having installed in compliance with code when they were paid to do so. And many have expressed the concern here that their insurance requires it.

While I understand your conclusion that an LNB whose flange physically contacts a dish theoretically develops a conductive path from the mast to the coax outer shield, that does not satisfy the explicit mandate of the code and therefore a DirecTV or DISH Network system installer is not supposed to satisfy the grounding requirement that way. Furthermore, since the LNB support tube has a painted surface, it would not meet any accepted practice standards for attaching a ground wire or completing a ground path because its conductivity would be suspect.

Insofar as insurance liability is concerned, in the decade and a half in which I have participated in thousands of discussions on grounding, I have never once received a credible, verifiable report of an insurance company either refusing to pay a claim or using its subrogation right to sue an installer for recoup of any insurance payment it has made to an insured customer who had incurred damage to their improperly grounded antenna system.
I read the satellite message boards too and most would say the same thing about employer requirements being the leading reason for grounding a dish, i.e. the threat of chargebacks. I get the impression (and correct me if I'm wrong) that regarding antennas you see grounding as unnecessarily prioritized by DIYers... Not that it's without value, just disproportionately emphasized. Along the same lines as things like buying special expensive tools to cut coax without squashing the dielectric, when all along they were going to strip off the squashed part regardless.

Anyway, your insight is extremely valuable and readers would do well to follow your advice.
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post #9 of 124 Old 10-11-2014, 12:47 PM
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Looking for advice on how/where to ground a rooftop antenna.

For a long time I've been wanting to hookup an old rooftop antenna to my dish network system. I have a 722K with an OTA Module. This gives me two extra tuners for ota only, which helps reduce timer conflicts. Since I didn't want to drill any extra holes in the walls to run the antenna cabling, I figured out(with some help) how to run it directly through the dish wiring with the use of splitters/diplexers. Works great.

I do want to ground the antenna but don't know how. The Dish system is already grounded(see photo below), I'm wondering if I can run a wire to the same grounding block? Or do I need to ground it separately? Any suggestions would be great.

The cabling at the bottom of the photo is from the antenna, which goes into the splitter then diplexer.
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post #10 of 124 Old 10-23-2014, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by richeydog View Post
Looking for advice on how/where to ground a rooftop antenna.

For a long time I've been wanting to hookup an old rooftop antenna to my dish network system. I have a 722K with an OTA Module. This gives me two extra tuners for ota only, which helps reduce timer conflicts. Since I didn't want to drill any extra holes in the walls to run the antenna cabling, I figured out(with some help) how to run it directly through the dish wiring with the use of splitters/diplexers. Works great.

I do want to ground the antenna but don't know how. The Dish system is already grounded(see photo below), I'm wondering if I can run a wire to the same grounding block? Or do I need to ground it separately? Any suggestions would be great.

The cabling at the bottom of the photo is from the antenna, which goes into the splitter then diplexer.
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post #11 of 124 Old 10-23-2014, 06:08 PM
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Just run 10 gauge solid copper from the antenna mast to the ground block and call it done. While you're up there you should replace those twist-on fittings with compression fittings to prevent water migration and inevitable corrosion. A cheaper alternative would be to find some 1/2" heat shrink tubing and hit it with a lighter but there are other problems with twist-on fittings besides moisture. I snip them off immediately whenever I see them. Also, it takes all of 10 seconds and a 3 cent zip tie to make that service loop into a neat circle. I hope you did that and not the technician. Yuck

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post #12 of 124 Old 10-27-2014, 01:58 PM
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Grounding outdoor antenna... where?

Hello everyone,


I recently bought a RCA ANT751R to get OTA television at our new place - and plan on mounting it on or near the roof (don't know if peak of roof of eaves in back of house is preferred location, I would imagine peak since it's directly above the breaker/meter and is about 5' higher but if anyone has differing opinions let me know), I've read the NEC code and bought all of the relevant supplies for the install, one big issue remains: I can't seem to find the main ground.


Our house doesn't appear to have a ground rod, I've tried digging for it and nothing is down there that I can see. Our house is built on a slab, so perhaps it's embedded in the concrete, or they used the water main - considering it's on the other side of the house I doubt that.


I've attached a photo of the service box/panel - they are combined into one unit so I imagine the ground is hiding in there somewhere. The stuff on either side is sprinkler/HVAC so ignore those.


I know NEC permits grounding to the service enclosure, which looks like it may be the best bet in this scenario short of having an electrician or the power company come out - which I would rather avoid.


Any feedback on this would be great.
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post #13 of 124 Old 10-27-2014, 02:38 PM
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Start digging around the conduit for the Telephone NID with a hand shovel. You will find out if that ground wire connects to a Ufer ground, or goes to a ground rod. Do not get all gung ho and start slamming the shovel in the ground. Just take your time and loosen up the soil, then use your hand to move it aside.

Usually the ground wires are around 4"-6" under the soil.
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post #14 of 124 Old 10-27-2014, 03:42 PM
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The telephone and CATV conduits (black cables, really) are in PVC pipes that go down several inches. Keep digging?
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post #15 of 124 Old 10-27-2014, 03:47 PM
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Cable grounded directly to service panel

When my cable was installed, the installer just attached the green ground wire with a tag that says 'do not remove' directly to the service panel. They must know what they are doing, right.
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post #16 of 124 Old 10-28-2014, 06:27 AM
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Cheapest route would be simply use a corner clamp for a few bucks
https://www.google.com/search?q=grou...ed=0CAcQ_AUoAg

If the electrical service conduit is metal and not pvc you could use a strap, that's pretty cheap too
http://www.alliedboltinc.com/product...ed%2024GAB.jpg

Usually inside the cable co. enclosure (2nd from bottom) there should be a ground block with a wire going to a ground source. It'll be the only wire coming out of that box that's not coax. I wouldn't recommend this but if you could flip the breaker for that receptacle and get a ground wire in there you could pigtail off of that ground. If all else fails, hire an electrician to add a grounding busbar below the meter and ground whatever you want to it.
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post #17 of 124 Old 10-28-2014, 07:11 AM
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Please use existing threads before starting a new one. Threads merged.

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post #18 of 124 Old 10-29-2014, 12:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acesat View Post
Cheapest route would be simply use a corner clamp for a few bucks
https://www.google.com/search?q=grou...ed=0CAcQ_AUoAg

If the electrical service conduit is metal and not pvc you could use a strap, that's pretty cheap too
http://www.alliedboltinc.com/product...ed%2024GAB.jpg

Usually inside the cable co. enclosure (2nd from bottom) there should be a ground block with a wire going to a ground source. It'll be the only wire coming out of that box that's not coax. I wouldn't recommend this but if you could flip the breaker for that receptacle and get a ground wire in there you could pigtail off of that ground. If all else fails, hire an electrician to add a grounding busbar below the meter and ground whatever you want to it.
Ground wire in the CATV box (green) goes inside the wall. Which leads me to think I have some weird ufer ground integrated into the slab foundation. Corner clamp it is.
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post #19 of 124 Old 11-16-2014, 08:20 AM
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Really stupid question I realize. But exposing my ignorance, newbiness here. All of this talk of grounding, is this for lightning protection?

I am not totally satisfied with my in-attic antenna for OTA reception and am therefor considering going to a roof one. As we live in an are prone to a lot of storms, especially in the April/May time of the year, I want to protect my system from lightning strikes. Is grounding the outdoor antenna going to be sufficient to do so? I would think that I would need some sort of in-line surge protector.

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post #20 of 124 Old 11-16-2014, 12:57 PM
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... All of this talk of grounding, is this for lightning protection?
The talk is for whomever spaketh. Grounding the mast is intended to make it a less inviting target to lightning and to shunt as much of the lightning energy as possible to ground. Grounding the coax cable as near as possible to the point at which it enters the building sdimilarly shunts dangerous current to ground. The standards for each have been determined under the model National Electric Code, or NEC, to be recommended and often mandated procedures for minimizing the fire and shock hazards that external antennas create.

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I want to protect my system from lightning strikes. Is grounding the outdoor antenna going to be sufficient to do so? I would think that I would need some sort of in-line surge protector.
Protecting your system from damage from lightning strikes is an incidental benefit to grounding it for fire and shock prevention, but such grounding can never be wholly adequate for that purpose, because it just doesn't take much of a "zap" to damage semi-conductors in consumer electronic products, so you can still additionally benefit from adding surge protection devices into an otherwise grounded antenna signal path.

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post #21 of 124 Old 11-18-2014, 08:38 AM
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Ive got a question about using my Radio Shack UHF/VHF combiner as the ground block for my system and not install a separate ground block at the pole which would add more connectors and cuts in the lines. The combiner has a ground screw on it and i would run a copper wire from it to a ground rod below the mast. My mast is attached outside to an old 3" steel big dish post that runs about 2.5 feet into the ground. I would appreciate any thoughts on this.

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post #22 of 124 Old 11-18-2014, 10:01 AM
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The RS UVSJ UHF/VHF combiner (diplexer) can be used instead of a grounding block. That is why the screw is there.

But, connecting it to a separate ground rod below the mast would satisfy the code requirements only if that rod is connected to the house system ground with a 6 gauge wire. The code requires the two grounds to be bonded together to eliminate any potential difference between them.

Your alternative would be to run two 10 gauge copper wires to the house electrical system ground; one for the mast and one for the grounding block.

Copper wire is getting expensive; 10 gauge is a lot less expensive than 6 gauge.

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post #23 of 124 Old 11-18-2014, 10:19 AM
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Thanks for the quick answer rabbit73. I will do what you recommended.
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post #24 of 124 Old 11-26-2014, 04:16 AM
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Another grounding noob here.

I'm going to cut the cord on Comcast and will be putting up a Wineguard antenna on the roof. I'm still confused about grounding. I know I need two #10 gauge ground wires - one for the mast of antenna and one for the coax grounding block.

I do not see a ground rod on my property, but I do see the painted copper wire coming out of the ground near the water meter. The wire runs up from the ground (the white plasticky tube is covering/protecting it), then it wraps around the meter pipe.

Is it okay for me to ground my two wires (from antenna mast and coax grounding block) to this wire and/or meter??? The wire is definitely solid copper, just painted over long ago when the house was built. I just never noticed it, until I was searching for a ground rod around my house. See pictures.

Thanks in advance.
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post #25 of 124 Old 11-26-2014, 07:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0x0is0 View Post
Another grounding noob here.

I'm going to cut the cord on Comcast and will be putting up a Wineguard antenna on the roof. I'm still confused about grounding. I know I need two #10 gauge ground wires - one for the mast of antenna and one for the coax grounding block.

I do not see a ground rod on my property, but I do see the painted copper wire coming out of the ground near the water meter. The wire runs up from the ground (the white plasticky tube is covering/protecting it), then it wraps around the meter pipe.

Is it okay for me to ground my two wires (from antenna mast and coax grounding block) to this wire and/or meter??? The wire is definitely solid copper, just painted over long ago when the house was built. I just never noticed it, until I was searching for a ground rod around my house. See pictures.

Thanks in advance.
I'd suggest you seek professional help. That's a photo of a gas meter and the solid copper wire is an insulated wire that runs along side the buried plastic gas pipe. The wire is there to facilitate locating the pipe should the need arise.

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post #26 of 124 Old 11-26-2014, 08:00 PM
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Yikes. I'm so embarrassed. Thank you for your reply.

I just assumed that was the ground wire since all the phone and cable TV and water come into the house from that general area. Then I see this funny looking copper wire sticking out of the dirt, so I assume they are grounding something or maybe there was a rod there somewhere. OOPS.

If I open up the phone box I can see their 10 gauge green wire (I don't have ATT home phone service anymore; don't care). If I open up the little TV cable box (where Comcast Cable comes in) I can also see their green ground wire too. I just don't know (can't see) where that green wire goes to at the other ends. It runs in the internal wall of the garage.

I really don't want to put the Wineguard antenna in the same spot as the DISH/satellite (kinda low; that's where you see the two coax running down along the outside wall). We gave up on them years ago; just never took it down. But that's where the technician hooked up everything when they were here. We want to put the TV antenna higher up on the roof in a different/better location, then have the feed go to grounding block, then enters the attic down to a wiring closet to the amp and 8-way splitter.

I recently re-wired the whole house with CAT6 and RG6, so all the rooms upstairs and downstairs can have a TV and are hard-wired for internet. (When the house was built, it only gave us TV hookup in two rooms, LOL!) Anyway, all my cables meet in the closet of a spare room, second level (my wiring closet) where the Motorola surfboard modem, Asus router, Cisco small business switch, TrendNet patch panel, Electroline amp and Leviton 8-way TV splitter sit. And all my wiring/cabling test passed, according to my test meter.

One of my last steps is to put the TV antenna outside, but I just don't know where to ground the antenna mast and the grounding block before it enters the house/attic. It can't be this hard, can it?

Sorry for being a noobie and the long post
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post #27 of 124 Old 11-27-2014, 08:36 PM
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It would be easier to make out details in the picture if it were bigger but I can't zoom in at all. The electric meter sticks out, refer to post #16 regarding corner clamps.

Perhaps antenna guys can correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't #17 CCS messenger wire conform to code for between the antenna mast and ground block? It's acceptable for dishes which I think are simply classified as antennas. If so, that would be a much nicer looking finished product. It can be hard to find that kind of cable in small quantities but here's what I found

$12 for 50 ft: http://amzn.com/B002HEY3BY

If that's not enough try phoning a satellite company or technician and see if they'll sell you some for ideally between 7-25 cents/ft. Everything is for sale, call around until you find someone who likes money but not enough to try ripping you off. Be generous in your estimates for length.
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post #28 of 124 Old 01-14-2015, 06:49 PM
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Question Antenna install on outbuilding, how to ground

I posted this to the main forum, but it was suggested that I post my question to this thread instead.

Hello,

I just completed our new house build and want to install a HD antenna. My intentions are to mount the antenna on my 40x60 shop that's about 60ft from the house and connected with buried conduit. I'm thinking about this for several reasons; it doesn't require any holes in the roof of my house, aesthetics, and it is a clearer line of sight to the TV station antennas. I bought a Channel Master 4228 antenna, and a Channel Master CM-7777 amplifier. I ran RG-6 to the proposed antenna location to test and I got the reception I expected. Now I'm ready to mount the antenna permanently and have some questions regarding grounding it.

I've been doing a little research and what I've found says I need to ground both my antenna mast and the RG-6 as close to where it enters the building as possible. I've also read it's best to ground everything to the same grounding rod that the house is connected to.

The shop does have electrical service that comes from the house via a 2-pole 100 amp breaker from my house electrical panel to another 2-pole 100 amp breaker in the shop's electrical panel. However, the shop doesn't have a separate ground rod.

What's the best strategy for this? Is my idea to mount the antenna on an outbuilding reasonable? Should I ground the signal wire before it enters the house or the shop? Should I put in a new grounding rod to ground the antenna mast? When it comes to protecting my family and my possessions it's worth taking the time to do things right, even if it means changing my plans if necessary.

I've attached picture of my layout and the shop's electrical panel.


Thanks for the help
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post #29 of 124 Old 01-15-2015, 10:52 AM
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Different jurisdictions have different electric codes. I called the building inspector where I live when I installed my antenna and mast. He said I should install an 8 ft ground rod at the base of the mast and connect the new ground rod to the main electrical ground rod with a solid #6 copper wire. He said I could install the coax cable grounding block either at the base of my mast and connect it the new ground rod or place it just prior to entry to the house and ground it to the main electrical ground. I would recommend checking with your local building inspector for what is correct in your area. I think the most important thing is that all ground rods have to be connected together so they are all at the same electric potential.
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post #30 of 124 Old 03-30-2015, 06:52 PM
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Question About Ground Wire Routing

I am in Milwaukee WI - zip 53172. All of the local stations are north of my home, the furthest is 15 miles away. I purchased a Channel Master SMARTenna 35/50 (model CM3000HD) that I would prefer to install in the attic. The house is a one and a half story home with aluminum siding, and some foil backed insulation in the attic (the attic is more like an upstairs crawl space). For the most part reception with the antenna in the attic is great - but I did get some pixelization on the local NBC affiliate. So now I am considering mounting the antenna outdoors.

A diagram of the north facing of the house is at clemke[dot]com/misc/house_wiring_2.gif The antenna can be mounted to the siding with a wall mount, or I have a J mast that I can attach to the house. I was considering mounting the J mast at the peak of the roof. If I do that, how do I route the ground wire from the mast? Everything I have read says that it should be a direct route the grounding rod. A direct route from the peak of the roof will put the grounding cable right in the center of the upper window. Could I take both the ground wire and the coax over to the right, then down parallel with the electric service conduit and the cable and dsl cables?

If it has to be a straight line down to the grounding rod, I suppose I could attach the antenna using the wall mount to the left of the upper window, and then bring the ground wire (and coax) down in a straight line. If I have to mount it to the wall, however, I'd rather mount it to the right of the window, together with the other wires to keep things looking neater. This however would not solve the direct path straight down for the ground wire, there would still a small bit of routing. Also, mounting to the left or right of the upper window does not put the antenna at the highest point of the house. The lower height of mounting on the wall to the side of the window vs mounting on the J mast at the peak, may not matter, however, because I have tested with the antenna laying in front of the upstairs window, and the reception is great.

Any advice would be appreciated. I'd prefer to just keep the antenna in the attic, so if you've got ideas on how to make that work with an aluminum sided home, I'd appreciate the help. If attic mounting is not going to be a viable solution, then any advice you can share on the exterior mounting and ground wire routing would also be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance for your time.
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