Differences between HDMI Switcher - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 4 Old 08-13-2015, 02:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Differences between HDMI Switcher

I actually posting it again as I posted it on the wrong forum by mistake few hours ago (and I can't delete the old post).

My old LG only come with 2 HDMI in slots. I just bought a new console, and it's difficult to manually switch the HDMI cable everytime I want to use it.

I noted you can have 15$ HDMI switchers on sites like DealExreme or AliExpress on the lower end, all the way up to 100$. I'm trying to figure out if there is any Video quality difference between the cheap alternatives and the more expensive solutions. I remember an old thread here mentioned there is no difference between a simple HDMI cable, to very expensive HDMI cable because at the end of the road it's a digital signal - It works, or it doesn't work.

Is it fair to say the same thing about the cheap switches? they all have the same image quality? Because latency is important (Games), does cheaper switches add video latency?
If not - I'm guessing that the only difference between the cheap/expensive modules are the parts quality on how long it will take the device to break/stop working over time?

thanks!
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post #2 of 4 Old 08-13-2015, 03:05 PM
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Are you using a receiver as your hub? I have one HDMI cable connecting my receiver to my tv and I can switch seamlessly between multiple devices connected to the receiver with a Harmony remote. Some like to use CEC if available but there are lots of issues with that. Even if you don't have a receiver you can program the Harmony to switch HDMI inputs on the tv depending on which source you want to use.
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post #3 of 4 Old 08-13-2015, 03:11 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi Otto Pylot,
Sadly, I don't have any receiver. All my devices are connected directly to the TV. So an HDMI switcher will be standing between the devices and the TV.
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post #4 of 4 Old 08-16-2015, 11:38 AM - Thread Starter
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Just updating this thread about doing some research during the weekend so future searcher can use it. I'm quoting alk3997:

Quote:
Originally Posted by alk3997

The archives in this forum have lots of discussions about this topic. Most people find it hard to believe that the HDMI cable carries digital information not analog. So, unless the switch is changing the 1s and 0s that are going across the cable, then there will not be any change in video quality.

Now if a 1 or 0 is changed, that would be a random occurrance and it actually results in very obvious artifacts such as sparkles, screens of a solid color (such as a completely green screen), no picture and lines). It does not result in loss of resolution, decreased contrast, brighter screen or anything that you might thing an analog cable would do. Also some switches don't properly handle the copy protection part of HDMI, called HDCP, but I haven't seen as many complaints with the newer switches.

The exception to this is what is called the lowest common denominator. HDMI only sends out one video and one audio signal. So, the source unit will only send out a signal that all sinks (the destination units) can handle, using a token called the EDID that goes from sink to source. So if you hook up an AVR and a stereo TV as sinks, then you will only get stereo to both the TV and the AVR and no multichannel. If you hook up two TVs and one is 3D but not the other, then both TVs will be unable to get 3D. Since you are planning on a 2x1 switch into one AVR input, you should be OK there.

So, a simple 2x1 switch should solve your problem - just get one that supports the latest version of HDMI that all of your source devices have.
With that, I think I'll go with a cheap HDMI switcher
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