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CHASLS2 09-08-2019 09:34 AM

Signal meter on Sammy tv
 
Got a new Samsung TV for another room that shows a signal meter every time you change the chan. Odd that it changes by the hour. One chan can be near 80% and a hour latter 20%, seems to happen with all the OTA- HD chans. Not sure what would cause the change from almost nothing to near 80%. Even with near nothing showing on the meter the chan does not break up.

Otto Pylot 09-08-2019 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CHASLS2 (Post 58529388)
Got a new Samsung TV for another room that shows a signal meter every time you change the chan. Odd that it changes by the hour. One chan can be near 80% and a hour latter 20%, seems to happen with all the OTA- HD chans. Not sure what would cause the change from almost nothing to near 80%. Even with near nothing showing on the meter the chan does not break up.

Signal meters on a lot of tv's are not very accurate. I rarely used mine, even when adjusting the antenna when we had OTA. You will see fluctuations depending on the time of day, your location, and weather.

nathill 09-12-2019 06:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CHASLS2 (Post 58529388)
Got a new Samsung TV for another room that shows a signal meter every time you change the chan. Odd that it changes by the hour. One chan can be near 80% and a hour latter 20%, seems to happen with all the OTA- HD chans. Not sure what would cause the change from almost nothing to near 80%. Even with near nothing showing on the meter the chan does not break up.


My smart Samsung TVs have a signal meter that reads in SNR as well as relative signal strength. I personally find SNR the best and easier to obtain measurement of signal quality I've got.

nathill 09-12-2019 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Otto Pylot (Post 58529448)
Signal meters on a lot of tv's are not very accurate. I rarely used mine, even when adjusting the antenna when we had OTA. You will see fluctuations depending on the time of day, your location, and weather.


My smart Samsung TVs have a signal meter that reads in SNR as well as relative signal strength. I personally find SNR the best and easiest way to obtain a useful measurement of signal quality.

Otto Pylot 09-12-2019 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nathill (Post 58546408)
My smart Samsung TVs have a signal meter that reads in SNR as well as relative signal strength. I personally find SNR the best and easiest way to obtain a useful measurement of signal quality.

So do my little Samsung's and LG. The LG has Signal Quality as well as Signal Strength (SNR). Both are good guides but I found they weren't very accurate because pq didn't always coincide with readings. At times they would indicate that I should be pixelating or blocking when the pq in fact was pristine, unless the readings were really low or bouncing all over the place. They are good indicators to give one a good idea when searching but I never used them to fine tune my reception. I just tweaked the rotor until I got a clean, consistent picture once the direction was determined.

CHASLS2 09-12-2019 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Otto Pylot (Post 58547328)
So do my little Samsung's and LG. The LG has Signal Quality as well as Signal Strength (SNR). Both are good guides but I found they weren't very accurate because pq didn't always coincide with readings. At times they would indicate that I should be pixelating or blocking when the pq in fact was pristine, unless the readings were really low or bouncing all over the place. They are good indicators to give one a good idea when searching but I never used them to fine tune my reception. I just tweaked the rotor until I got a clean, consistent picture once the direction was determined.

Mine will show blank and i get a perfect pic and no break up.

Calaveras 09-13-2019 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Otto Pylot (Post 58547328)
So do my little Samsung's and LG. The LG has Signal Quality as well as Signal Strength (SNR). Both are good guides but I found they weren't very accurate because pq didn't always coincide with readings. At times they would indicate that I should be pixelating or blocking when the pq in fact was pristine, unless the readings were really low or bouncing all over the place. They are good indicators to give one a good idea when searching but I never used them to fine tune my reception. I just tweaked the rotor until I got a clean, consistent picture once the direction was determined.

Signal Quality and SNR are same thing. Signal Strength is a different parameter. It is not SNR. In most cases any SNR reading above 15 dB should produce a perfect picture. Many TVs incorrectly label SNR as Signal Strength and many TVs don't actually have a Signal Strength meter. If your Signal Strength and Signal Quality meters track each other then the Signal Strength meter is just a Signal Quality meter with a different scale.

Otto Pylot 09-13-2019 03:45 PM

Agreed. That’s why I said they are not accurate and are only good for giving you an idea.

videobruce 09-18-2019 03:00 PM

Most (not all) border on useless, providing one can actually find some of them buried deep in their lame menu. AFA better then nothing, that maybe detectable with many.


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