Mr Bob's home 73" finally available to a true afficianado - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 2 Old 11-22-2019, 03:02 PM - Thread Starter
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Exclamation Mr Bob's home 73" finally available to true CRT afficianado

WS-73517. Last of its kind.


It's time. I have often stated on AVS that I wanted to be buried in my faithful Mit CRT, but my sigO has put the kabosh on having such a giant monster around any further, dominating our living room. So I have decided to finally divest.

This magnificent set has virtually all the bells and whistles talked about in the 400 page oft-contributed-to thread I started in 2006 called "Don't Dump your CRT RPTV!" It figured very prominently in that thread through all the years of that thread's activity, as each of its modifications took place. (That thread, incidentally, hit the million-view mark several years ago, and the number of eventual contributors warmed my heart. Thanks guys!) She is purring like a kitten as we speak, looking fabulous as always.

Before OLED, CRT had led the field in pure, transparent blacks for decades. As such, any videophile who - like me - HAD to have the depth that produced that unique crystal clear shadow detail and those deep inky blacks had CRT, whether it was front projected, rear projected or direct view. Hence my incredibly long and loving ownership of this delightful critter.


Mine is the largest production 9x16 CRT RPTV ever designed, and is from the final model year they made them. It has been pristinely maintained and kept super tweaked at all times, delivering the utmost in hypnotic viewing pleasure. And not a scratch on it.

It has had the overscan reduction accomplished via the finest possible way - the shimming technique - rather than image face reduction. Its image on the CRT face itself has also been expanded on each gun to allow for the most surface area use possible, and the outer 2 guns have been re-aimed and their images recentered, to not lose any of the viewing area capacity possible with the oversized 9" guns. 9" guns were only available from Mit in their 73" and 65" sizes, where the 65" size added the 9" guns way far along in their production years.

Mit designed the CRT array bulkhead to accommodate either the 65" or the 73", meaning both lost appreciable CRT face area in the process of allowing for 2 different sizes of screen - and thus centerings of the image - on the CRT faces. For my set I corrected that in favor of the 73" size only, restoring the full use of all surface area possible. Mit really should have done independent centerings of the outer 2 guns, depending on which size of screen they would hit. They didn't. So I did.

All other sizes of the Mit lineup used the 7" guns, which were the typical size used in nearly all CRT RPTVs at the time. Except for Zenith and Philips and possibly one other - Marantz? - which also used 9" guns on their 65" sets.

This shimming and recentering and expanding on 9" guns delivers a more spacious rendition of whatever you are watching. More depth and clarity than 7" guns, across the board. My viewing distance is 9' back from the screen, which is markedly closer than normal for such sets. But it gives me a much bigger pic to watch than at 10' or 12' back, it commands my view completely and gives me that good old "front row seat". On more than one occasion I have had a viewer comment, "You've got your own private IMAX here!" Love it when that happens...



What is the shimming technique you say?

The 3" shims at each corner of the CRT array bulkhead raise the entire array up 3" closer to the mirror and thus the screen, which allows the CRTs themselves to reduce the overscan - and recapture the critical side viewing areas lost to the viewer by factory designed-in overscan common to all CRT RPTVs - optically, and without having to reduce the size of the pic on the CRT faces. Size reduction via height and width controls being how overscan reduction is usually done. Again, expanding the image instead allows for the absolute highest use of the CRT face areas, maintaining the spaciousness.


It also has the awesome CraigR crispness modification only available to sets which had a certain IC on the socket boards. With the addition of an adjustable pot on each of the socket boards in place of the factory designed fixed resistor, the crispness is super tweakable. That's Craig Rounds, if you are not familiar. A truly gifted calibrator/technician, and one I am honored to have met along the way. Thanks so much, Craig.

The red push can be eradicated completely with the PerfectColor settings in the user menu as long as you have the correct color decoder patterns, allowing the set to deliver true color linearity rather than being red pushed, as all Mit displays are set up to be. This set also has the capacity for 100% single color isolation in the service menu for these alignments, you can shut down red and blue completely if you only want green, etc. Rather than having to trust filters, as is the case with flat panels of today, and which only get you close. With true color isolation, truly linear color rendition is much more achievable.

The difference in color decoding between factory red push and truly aligned linear color tracking is really spectacular, with the deep color hues that result. Best example is a peacock feather, where the greens, blues and golds all stay vivid. In a red pushed scenario you get either one or the other or the other, but never all 3. Only linear color decoding can do that. And yes I have spoken to Mit about that, they don't want to hear it. They maintain their stance that pink and red is what their customer base wants. It shows up in their advertising, and has showed up in every grayscale I have calibrated over the years, on Mit units. Luckily they designed this set so well and in such an advanced way that I don't have to abide by their party line. I was able to calibrate a truly linear set for my viewing all these years.


The number of hours I have spent super tweaking this set have been uncountable, and it has all been worth it for more than a decade. With keeping the contrast at 21 out of a possible 63 90% of the time, there is no screenburn whatsoever and the light level is brilliant, should you want to watch in the daytime, with the set's contrast cranked up to about half.

She still looks better than the day I unwrapped her in my garage, and will continue to do so with the proper care and feeding.


These 73" Mit's originally sold for $10,000 at the outset of HD in our country. This set is available for $500 to the first person who claims her. It was designed to break apart very easily into top and bottom halves for transport, and I will personally coach the new owner in how to treat her, from user adjustments to the correct way to do the transport and keep critical settings intact. And I will stay available for advice, service level adjustments and maintenance - to make sure she stays in excellent viewing condition - for as long as I am alive and kicking.

When I sold my original HD set, the 65" Panasonic with both 720p and 1080i native and distinct with geometry and convergence memories completely separate from each other, a buyer from Everett Washington drove all the way down here to the Bay area with his aunt and some friends - his aunt is a fellow fallen away Catholic and we had some great chatting while he was getting the Panny ready - and drove it all the way back to Everett. Last time I checked in with him, years later, it was still the dazzling centerpiece of his living room, along with a very colorful computer with its insides showing and glowing.


Many of you reading this have been with me here at AVS enjoying CRT for a very long time. Check out the pic of the eye, it is a screenshot on this set from a CSI episode, one I captured with my actual camera at the time, not a phone cam. Even tho it doesn't really do the set justice, it takes a great stab at showing the amazing contrast ratio available via CRT, which is nearly impossible to obtain with today's rear-lit DLPs and flat panels. My buddy Cliff in Indiana put 3 Sony G90s together and had intrepid calibrator Ken Whitcomb converge them all to the same screen, and it measured 525,000:1 contrast ratio. Not quite a million to one, which was OLED's opening bid in the CR area, but effectively just as impressive. It's still the next best thing to OLED, and have you checked prices on 73" OLEDs? I'd say my price is better...


Mr Bob
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Robert Jones
Image Perfection
510-278-4247
650-333-4808 cell
bob at imageperfection dot com
www.projectiontvtroubleshootingadvice.com
YouTube channel: mrbobbigscreen


Last edited by Mr Bob; 11-23-2019 at 08:32 PM.
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post #2 of 2 Old 12-01-2019, 12:50 PM - Thread Starter
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I am lowering my price from $500 to $350. Have uncountable hours into optimizing its display over the years, but time is marching on...

Robert Jones
Image Perfection
510-278-4247
650-333-4808 cell
bob at imageperfection dot com
www.projectiontvtroubleshootingadvice.com
YouTube channel: mrbobbigscreen

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