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Guide: Building a 4K HTPC for madVR

Last Updated: 2019-04-29

What is madVR? | Complete madVR Set up | How to Get Help

This guide outlines the hardware necessary to achieve high-performance playback from madVR at 3840 x 2160p.

The current landscape of UHD technology is shifting and true 4K PC support is still new. Therefore, this guide is incomplete and anyone looking to build a 4K HTPC in 2019 should proceed with caution until PC support of UHD Blu-ray and 4K media is more mature.

Currently, madVR is the only media software on Windows that supports HDR10 metadata passthrough using APIs provided by AMD and Nvidia without relying on forced system-wide HDR output offered by Windows 10. Both SDR and HDR content will playback correctly with automatic EOTF and color space switching.

1 – CPU

It is unrealistic for all but the most powerful modern CPUs to decode high-bitrate, 10-bit 4K HEVC video using CPU-based (software) decoding. The computing power required to decode HEVC is 5-10 times higher than equivalent H.264/MPEG-4 AVC.

Considering the UHD standard calls for data rates of up to 82 Mbit/s for 50 GB discs, 108 Mbit/s for 66 GB discs and 128 Mbit/s for 100 GB discs, even low bitrate 4K UHD content is close to double the bitrate of 1080p Blu-ray (max. of 54 Mbit/s). Those bitrates include both audio and video. But, coupled with slow HEVC decoding, the load posed by 4K UHD Blu-ray is formidable for any CPU or hardware decoder. So we will assume the bulk of difficult 10-bit HEVC decoding will be handled by a fixed-function GPU hardware decoder capable of handling high-bitrate decoding.

If you want legal playback of UHD Blu-ray discs, Intel Kaby Lake (7th generation) Core i5 or i7 processors are a minimum requirement for compatibility with UHD Blu-ray drives. The choice of CPU is only relevant if you want legal playback of UHD Blu-ray disks (not rips). Otherwise, any CPU is appropriate as long as you are satisfied with boot times and OS performance.

The critical component of a HTPC is the GPU. So don't worry too much about the CPU and motherboard. The CPU should remain mostly idle during HTPC use.

Intel (with legal UHD Blu-ray disc support):

Minimum: Kaby Lake Core i5
Extreme: Kaby Lake Core i7

Intel (for general HTPC use):

Budget: Pentium
Performance: Core i3
Extreme: Core i5 or i7

AMD (for general HTPC use):

Budget: AMD Ryzen 3
Performance: AMD Ryzen 3
Extreme: AMD Ryzen 5 or 7

2 – Motherboard

The motherboard must be compatible with the chosen CPU and fit into the chosen case form factor.

Considerations:

  • RAM Types
    (e.g. DDR2, DDR3, DDR4)
  • RAM Frequencies
    (e.g. 1066 MHz up to 4600 MHz)
  • Memory Slots
    (e.g. 4 x 240-pin DIMM)
  • Max. Memory
    (e.g. 32GB)
  • Expansion Slots
    (e.g. 1 x PCI Express 3.0 x16 for GPUs / 4 x SATA 6Gb/s / 1 x PCI Express 2.0 x1 for TV tuner cards)
  • High-Speed SSD Slots (up to 40Gb/s vs. 6Gb/s SATA III)
    (e.g. 1 x M.2)
  • CPU Overclocking
    (e.g. Intel H97 vs. Z97 / cheap AMD vs. 990FX)
  • USB 3.0
    (e.g. 4 x USB 3.0 Ports)
  • Onboard Gigabit Ethernet
    (e.g. 1 x 1000 Mbit/s)
  • Onboard Wireless LAN
    (e.g. Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac or 1 x Mini PCI Express)
  • Onboard Bluetooth
    (e.g. Bluetooth 4.0/3.0 or 1 x Mini PCI Express)
  • S/PDIF Out
    (e.g. 1 x Optical)
  • Case Form Factor
    (e.g. ATX (tower), mini ITX (small form factor), micro ATX (slim profile))

3 – Memory

Up to the discretion of the user. Larger amounts of RAM than recommended are suitable for PCs that double as gaming rigs.

Buying two equal-sized memory modules (e.g. 2 x 4GB) and inserting them into the paired slots on the motherboard can result in small improvements in memory read, copy, write, latency and bandwidth performance and should be strongly considered if you are using onboard video graphics rather than a dedicated GPU.

Single-Channel vs. Dual-Channel - Does It Matter?

Minimum: 6GB
Recommended: 8GB

4 – Internal Storage

A Solid State Drive (SSD) is recommended for HTPC use. Instant access speeds provided by SSDs will make a PC fast in every regard from boot times to responsive control of the operating system. SSDs will also improve the performance of media front-ends such as Kodi and Emby by significantly reducing the time required to cache and load artwork.

Minimum: 80GB
Recommended: 120-240GB

Data Interface: SATA III: 6Gbit/s; PCIe x8: 40 Gbit/s.

Physical Connector:

  • SATA: 6Gbit/s (SATA Interface);
  • PCIe: up to 40Gbit/s (PCIe x8) - actual performance tends to be much lower (PCIe Interface);
  • M.2: up to 40Gbit/s (PCIe x8) - actual performance tends to be much lower (SATA Interface M.2 and PCIe Interface M.2).

More on SSD types here.

More on PCIe vs. SATA here.

5 – Graphics Card

The majority of madVR processing is carried out on the graphics card. 4K playback is not the primary concern of picking a suitable card. Rather, upscaling any HD video to 2160p (4K) revolves around the use of costly image doubling — preferably, NGU. High definition scaling factors start at 2x (1080p -> 2160p) and can become as large as 3x (720p -> 2160p). An ideal 4K graphics card would allow for the use of image doubling plus artifact removal and post-processing for FHD content — often combining multiple shaders and upscaling under one profile. Cards with this power will have no problem playing 10-bit 4K UHD.

HEVC hardware decoding is also a consideration. The chosen GPU should be capable of decoding 10-bit HEVC with a full-function (not hybrid) hardware decoder capable of decoding high-bitrate HEVC without reducing the rendering performance of the GPU.

Up to 4GB of VRAM can be required when using normal queue sizes combined with NGU image scaling, common madVR processing and subtitles.

Considerations:

  • 4GB+ of VRAM
  • Fixed-function 10-bit HEVC decoder
  • HDMI 2.0a/b (4K 60 fps)

Minimum

These are mid-level cards capable of upscaling 1080p content using super-xbr/NGU image scaling with artifact removal and post-processing. This allows the user to take advantage of all madVR features, only compromising in algorithm quality (e.g. NGU low, medium and sometimes high) and with content with high frame rates (>25 fps).

Recommended

These are mid-high cards capable of upscaling 1080p content using NGU image doubling with artifact removal and post-processing. Fewer compromises are required at high frame rates and it is possible to use NGU high quality image doubling with some profiles. A reduction in settings may be necessary with 4K 60 fps, interlaced 60i sources and 720p60 broadcasts.

Performance

These are high-end cards capable of the most aggressive settings with little to no compromise playing any content. NGU very high quality with artifact removal and post-processing is possible with all profiles (SD, 720p, 1080p, 4K). Possible exceptions include 4K 60 fps, interlaced 60i sources and 720p60 broadcasts, which may require a reduction in some settings.

HDR Tone Mapping

The last category are for those primarily interested in buying a card to use madVR's high-quality pixel shader HDR tone mapping. The recommended cards are capable of using tone mapping with all of the HDR enhancements enabled (with some adjustment to the unimportant chroma upscaling setting) with 4K 24 fps content. A setting or two may be need to be disabled at 4K 60 fps, but this is a minor concern given the majority of 60 fps content is limited to HDR demo clips. Lesser cards can still run madVR's tone mapping in good quality, but a few performance compromises may have to be made.

Current GPUs:

Nvidia:

Minimum: GTX 1650
Recommended: GTX 1660 6GB / RTX 2060
Performance: RTX 2080
HDR Tone Mapping: GTX 1660 Ti / RTX 2060

AMD:

Minimum: RX 560 (Baffin XT, not Baffin XL; Discussion)
Recommended: RX 580
Performance: RX Vega 64
iGPU(Minimum): RX Vega M GL / RX Vega M GH
HDR Tone Mapping: RX Vega 56

Used GPUs:

Nvidia:

Minimum: GTX 960 4GB / GTX 1050 3GB / GTX 1050 Ti
Recommended: GTX 1060 6GB
Performance: GTX 1080 Ti
HDR Tone Mapping: GTX 1070 / GTX 1070 Ti

AMD:

Minimum: RX 470
Recommended: RX 480

Note: AMD Polaris cards struggle with NGU image scaling in madVR. This makes equivalent Nvidia cards the performance choice, even if benchmarks between equivalent cards can be similar.

Fan noise should also be considered when buying a GPU. There can be a lot of variability in fan quality and fan noise during video playback can be bothersome. Tests like this one for the RTX 2060 are best consulted before purchase.

On a budget and need basic 4K video processing:

AMD Ryzen 3 2200G, AMD Ryzen 5 2400G, Nvidia GT 1030 2GB and Nvidia GTX 1050 2GB are all capable of playing 4K 60 fps content with madVR, but only with basic processing.

Recommended Base Settings:

  • Set madVR to its default video processing settings and/or set image upscaling to DXVA2;
  • CPU and GPU queue sizes set to 8/8 or lower;
  • 8GB of the fastest RAM you can find should be run in dual-channel mode (2 x 4GB - only applies to AMD APUs);
  • XySubFilter is not recommended to render subtitles;
  • Use of 3D LUTs or tone mapping by pixel shaders are unlikely.

6 – Optical Drive

Official 4K UHD Blu-ray drive support is offered by Pioneer and LG. Those purchasing the BDR-S11J-BK (internal), BDR-S11J-X (internal) or LG WH16NS60 (internal) must combine the drive with:

  • Windows 10;
  • 6 GB of system RAM;
  • Motherboard with HDCP 2.2, SGX and AACS 3.0;
  • Intel Kaby Lake Core i5 or i7;
  • Intel HD Graphics 630 or 640.

Note: This only applies to legal UHD Blu-ray disc playback on a HTPC (not the drives required to rip these discs or for other decryption methods).

Cyberlink PowerDVD is the only option for legal playback software of 4K UHD discs on PC. The Pioneer drives arrive packaged with PowerDVD.

PowerDVD UHD Blu-ray System Requirements

Grey Market Decryption – UHD Blu-ray Disc Requirements:


How to Install Old Firmware into New UHD "Friendly" Drives

RedFox AnyDVD (HD) and DVDFab Passkey don't require any special motherboard, CPU or other hardware beyond a "friendly" Blu-ray drive, 4K-ready graphics card and available hashed keys for select discs.

The cost of any additional playback or decryption software should be factored in with the cost of the drive.

Drive Specifications: BDXL (triple-layer support)
Playback Software: Cyberlink PowerDVD, JRiver Media Center (with Blu-ray menu support), MPC and other free media players.

7 – Power Supply

The power supply must be large enough to provide the necessary wattage for all components when under load. Other considerations include its size — it must be small enough to fit inside the chosen case. And it should be reasonably quiet — suitable for watching videos in silence.

Websites such as this are available to provide estimates of the power draw of any assembled PC. An example system is shown below:



The 80 Plus certification program (Bronze to Titanium) defines the efficiency of the power supply. The higher the rating, the lower the power usage at a given wattage. Basically, this determines how much power is used by the PSU during normal use.

More on 80 Plus certification here.

8 – Case

The case is up to preference. It must be sized appropriately for the chosen motherboard and graphics card, and fit comfortably into its end-use component rack.

Form Factors:

  • ATX (tower)
  • HTPC (horizontal)
  • mini ITX (small form factor)
  • micro ATX (slim profile)

9 – CPU Cooler/Case Fans (Optional)

If you are not overclocking the CPU, an aftermarket CPU cooler is likely not needed. Most CPUs come with its own fan.

A cramped case may also require additional fans to supplement those that come with the case. Case fans can range in size from 25mm to 230mm, with larger fans producing less noise than smaller fans as they spin slower to move the same amount of air.

10 – Operating System

As DirectShow software, madVR is compatible with Windows operating systems.

Recommended OS (with UHD Blu-ray disc support):

  • Windows 10
Recommended OS (for general madVR playback):

  • Windows 8.1
  • Windows 10

11 – Accessories

Recommended Accessories:


Putting It All Together – Building Your System

Now that the components of a system have been outlined, it is time to build one for yourself!

PCPartPicker is a handy tool for experimenting with various hardware configurations. Thousands of components are found in its database from the most reputable brands in the PC industry linked directly to popular online parts sites. By creating a user account, you can create multiple parts lists and even purchase individual components directly from the vendor.

When attempting any build with PCPartPicker, I would recommend starting with the case then the CPU, ending with the power supply. The compatibility checker will ensure each part added to the list is compatible with the form factor, inputs and chipsets of the existing components.

Example madVR 4K HTPC Build

Ripping UHD Blu-ray Discs with MakeMKV

The easiest way to create UHD HDR10 media suitable for HTPC use is by ripping UHD Blu-ray discs. MakeMKV has made this process fairly simple. With an UHD "friendly" drive, MakeMKV can read the disc, as long as a decryption key for the disc is known, and rip the appropriate video, audio and subtitle tracks into an .mkv container. This is all lossless. The relevant tracks are simply packaged into an .mkv ready for playback by any media player, free or paid. If storage is an issue, the file can be compressed by software such as StaxRip.

UHD Blu-ray disc ripping requires:


How to Install Old Firmware into New UHD Drives

International UHD Drive Sales & Firmware Flashing Service

Ultra-High-Definition Blu-ray Disc (UHD-BD) Backup & Playback Guidance

Heads up - Support for Official LG UHD Drives Coming in 2019

Do not update the firmware of legacy UHD drives or it will no longer work. UHD "friendly" drives are drives produced for normal BR discs (so, AACS 1.0) but with BDXL (three/four layer disc) capabilities. These "friendly" drives may be less predictable than official UHD Blu-ray drives at reliably reading all UHD Blu-ray discs and the odd disc may fail to read. Both types of drives require older firmware versions (either flashed or factory) to unlock the ability to read and rip UHD discs.

The downloaded hashed key file must be installed into the MakeMKV data directory (which is set in the preferences - NOT the program directory). MakeMKV v1.12.3 added the option to update this file automatically with an Internet connection. The download link is updated weekly, sometimes several times a week. Those requiring manual updates should bookmark the above link and return back regularly. The hashed key method is different than the general crack of AACS 1.0 used to rip 1080p Blu-rays.

There are often many versions of each UHD Blu-ray disc, which cover many regions. If your disc is not supported, it is possible to take the dump file created when an attempt is made to open the UHD disc and send it to MakeMKV. That disc will be included in the next hashed key file update, so the disc can then be ripped. This means the creation of hashed keys is virtually infinite.

MakeMKV UHD Blu-ray FAQ

Tip: Set the minimum title length to 3600 seconds (60 minutes) and a default language preference in Preferences to ease the task of identifying the correct video, audio and subtitle tracks.

Other UHD Blu-ray Ripping Software:


External NAS Storage

Digital media usage requires a considerable amount of data storage (measured in terabytes, or TBs). 4K UHD media, in particular, can require a significant amount of hard drive space. This can be managed with cheap USB external hard drives, but such drives do not offer near the same level of reliability and protection as Network Attached Storage (NAS).

Average File Sizes of Current Rips:

  • DVD: 8GB (avg);
  • Blu-ray: 20GB-35GB (avg);
  • UHD Blu-ray: 50GB-80GB (avg).

All NAS offer some form of backup redundancy (RAID), where data is spread across multiple drives, sometimes allowing for the replacement of failed drives without upsetting the performance of the rest.

There are two ways to go about creating a NAS server:


Ready-made NAS devices come pre-loaded with proprietary software. Any existing drive array in a PC can be turned into a NAS drive pool by using software RAID.

RAID software is configurable to several RAID levels. RAID calculators are available to calculate the available capacity of each RAID level and tolerance to drive failure.

Example DIY Builds Using Popular RAID Software:

unRAID NAS Server

FlexRAID NAS Server / Windows Media Manager

Debate: unRAID vs. FlexRAID

SnapRAID (Free)

Windows Software – Media Front-Ends

Finally, the following media front-ends can be used to enhance the experience of video playback by organizing your media collection and providing artwork and detailed metadata for each title. Some front-ends also offer content from add-ons that can be played through the media player and enhanced by madVR.

Media front-ends with integrated madVR video players:


Media front-ends that support external players:


Last edited by Onkyoman; 06-12-2019 at 07:00 AM.
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post #2 of 2910 Old 03-13-2016, 04:47 PM
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tldr; GPU nvidia 950/960 with any recent mid level CPU would suffice for 4k until the new gfx cards come out later this year.
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post #3 of 2910 Old 03-13-2016, 09:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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tldr; GPU nvidia 950/960 with any recent mid level CPU would suffice for 4k until the new gfx cards come out later this year.
Thanks for your input...

Sure, I can agree a 950/960 is adequate for 4K madVR use. However, those who want to use NNEDI3 image doubling with post-processing debanding and image sharpening will be disappointed.

It has been proven by other users the GTX 960 is not powerful enough for NNEDI3 image doubling+. You would require a card such as a GTX 980 Ti. Even then, you could use more power. And there are still new madVR features on the horizon to further tax your GPU.
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post #4 of 2910 Old 03-14-2016, 10:44 AM
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It has to be said, though, that NNEDI3 image doubling is not really necessary. With my GTX 960 I can do 1080 -> 4K super-xbr + SuperRes (4) chroma, super-xbr + SuperRes (4) luma/chroma doubling, with power to spare. NNEDI3 is just too much of a power hog to be worthwhile, in my opinion. Having said that, I'm still looking forward to the new video cards this year.

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It has to be said, though, that NNEDI3 image doubling is not really necessary. With my GTX 960 I can do 1080 -> 4K super-xbr + SuperRes (4) chroma, super-xbr + SuperRes (4) luma/chroma doubling, with power to spare. NNEDI3 is just too much of a power hog to be worthwhile, in my opinion. Having said that, I'm still looking forward to the new video cards this year.
I'm running 2 R9 280X in crossfire, I'm only running a 2K monitor but it does well. Maxed out on GTA5.
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post #6 of 2910 Old 03-14-2016, 02:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by VBB View Post
It has to be said, though, that NNEDI3 image doubling is not really necessary. With my GTX 960 I can do 1080 -> 4K super-xbr + SuperRes (4) chroma, super-xbr + SuperRes (4) luma/chroma doubling, with power to spare. NNEDI3 is just too much of a power hog to be worthwhile, in my opinion. Having said that, I'm still looking forward to the new video cards this year.
super-xbr is adequate for clean sources. But it will introduce ringing (it rings more than any other algorithm in madVR, I believe). This is less of a problem when super-xbr is combined with SuperRes.

NNEDI3 doesn't really ring at all and can correct aliasing and ringing in the source. It depends on how much of a perfectionist you are.
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post #7 of 2910 Old 03-15-2016, 08:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onkyoman View Post
super-xbr is adequate for clean sources. But it will introduce ringing (it rings more than any other algorithm in madVR, I believe). This is less of a problem when super-xbr is combined with SuperRes.

NNEDI3 doesn't really ring at all and can correct aliasing and ringing in the source. It depends on how much of a perfectionist you are.
I'm only rolling with a gtx950 in my setup, so I have to use superxbr and/or lanczos3, luma doubling, w/ debanding and dithering. This gives pretty good image quality but importantly, I have my power and fan profile set up so that the gtx950 is silent (around 300-400rpm on the fan), no matter the source content.

NNEID3 looks great but you need a leaf blower to really utilize it. I'm hoping that the Pascal cards will offer gtx970 level performance in near silence.
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post #8 of 2910 Old 08-05-2016, 04:31 PM
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As for internal drives: WH14NS40 and WH16NS40 are both capable of reading 4k UHD blu-ray discs.

You will need TPM v2 too:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusted_Platform_Module

[]s,
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post #9 of 2910 Old 08-06-2016, 07:13 PM
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hi,
I want to know
madVR Whether Support 'SLI' ?
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post #10 of 2910 Old 08-07-2016, 04:03 PM - Thread Starter
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hi,
I want to know
madVR Whether Support 'SLI' ?
No, I don't believe so.
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post #11 of 2910 Old 08-07-2016, 05:28 PM
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I test GTX1070 X 2 SLI madvr 0.90.23 , it worked , two GPU be used , GPU load , GPU memory, GPU clock in GPU-Z, OS is win10pro.
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I test GTX1070 X 2 SLI madvr 0.90.23 , it worked , two GPU be used , GPU load , GPU memory, GPU clock in GPU-Z, OS is win10pro.
Ok, good to know. I imagine you could max out your settings with two cards?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gradius2 View Post
As for internal drives: WH14NS40 and WH16NS40 are both capable of reading 4k UHD blu-ray discs.

You will need TPM v2 too:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusted_Platform_Module
I'd like to learn more about doing this however I haven't seen any simple info on putting tpm on a drive...

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Can anyone confirm that the gtx 1060 will do passthrough of Atmos/DTSx? The answer should be yes but that is proving difficult to confirm.

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Can anyone confirm that the gtx 1060 will do passthrough of Atmos/DTSx? The answer should be yes but that is proving difficult to confirm.
Just replaced a GTX 980 in HTPC with a 1070 yesterday. It has the same format pass-through capabilities with its HDMI as the 980 does, just as it should.
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My computer in the home theater is using a GTX 960. I'm not currently using madVR as I was letting my JVC projector do the upscaling (I have a Samsung UHD Bluray for 4k playback.) Would it be better to use a lesser setting in madVR with the 960 or try to get hold of a GTX 1060 or Radeon RX480 to allow more NNEDI3 processing?

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post #17 of 2910 Old 10-03-2016, 06:02 PM - Thread Starter
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My computer in the home theater is using a GTX 960. I'm not currently using madVR as I was letting my JVC projector do the upscaling (I have a Samsung UHD Bluray for 4k playback.) Would it be better to use a lesser setting in madVR with the 960 or try to get hold of a GTX 1060 or Radeon RX480 to allow more NNEDI3 processing?
Use super-xbr with SuperRes when image doubling and you won't notice the difference. NNEDI3 is a waste of money.
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post #18 of 2910 Old 10-03-2016, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Onkyoman View Post
Use super-xbr with SuperRes when image doubling and you won't notice the difference. NNEDI3 is a waste of money.
You might want to qualify what display you're using before making such broad assertions.
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post #19 of 2910 Old 10-03-2016, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Onkyoman View Post
Use super-xbr with SuperRes when image doubling and you won't notice the difference. NNEDI3 is a waste of money.
Would it be possible to hit super-xbr with SuperRes and image doubling all on a GTX960?

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post #20 of 2910 Old 10-04-2016, 10:11 AM - Thread Starter
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Would it be possible to hit super-xbr with SuperRes and image doubling all on a GTX960?
Yes, try the guide in my signature. The last section has a number of sample settings.
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post #21 of 2910 Old 10-04-2016, 02:43 PM
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Yes, try the guide in my signature. The last section has a number of sample settings.

Onkyoman, not sure but I think you might be warner on the "other" forum.
Ive come to you as you really seam to know your stuff.
I may have asked you on the "other" forum but just want to re check here as Im not 100% happy with what Im doing.


I do use madvr with JRiver, and have the 1080 video card. My display is the JVD X9000 proj.


Ive always had a motion issue and why its not perfect is as follows....
As we have a film club I play a mix of content before the start of the feature, could be 24, 25, 30, 60, etc etc...
As the JVC has a massive slow sync, Ive been playing everything at 60Hz so I don't get the start of each new film showing a longggg black as the proj syncs to each refresh rate.
I have been using Smooth Motion with everything set at 60Hz but the blur is horrible on motion.


Is there a better way that you can think of doing what Im trying to do without getting the slow long refresh rate changes?

I think Smooth Motion makes everything worse for the added blur it introduces! I have tried turning it off and its better, but the judder then isn't nice, that's probably the 3.2 pull-down since Im on 60Hz, is that correct?

Would setting everything to 50Hz be better than 60Hz?

I know what Im doing isn't perfect and I would much prefer to play with the correct refresh rates, but the long sync of the JVCs are shocking! And its worse to get up to 15 secs missing from the start of shorts/trailers as the refresh rates change. I just wish displays could do instant refresh rate changes!

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Try SVP.
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post #23 of 2910 Old 10-04-2016, 04:02 PM
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Try SVP.

Ive never ever heard of that and just did a search, very interesting.
How does this differ to Smooth Motion on madvr?

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Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post
Ive never ever heard of that and just did a search, very interesting.
How does this differ to Smooth Motion on madvr?
It's more advanced. I believe madvr does basic frame blending. Svp is real frame interpolation.
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post #25 of 2910 Old 10-05-2016, 10:18 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post
Ive never ever heard of that and just did a search, very interesting.
How does this differ to Smooth Motion on madvr?
SVP will turn film into video, just like the similar setting on most LED TVs (Clear Motion, etc.). Yuck.

If you can't playback content at its native refresh rate, you have two options: live with 3/2 pulldown or use Smooth Motion. Personally, I prefer 3/2 pulldown and don't think it is all that far off true 24p playback, which is also laggy and less than perfect.

Making film look perfect in motion will always be a challenge.
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post #26 of 2910 Old 10-13-2016, 07:45 AM
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Well, I updated my card from a GTX960 to a GTX1070 so that I could use NNEDI3 for image doubling/etc. (I always use less for chroma.) I am having too long of render times so that I am dropping many frames. I followed the Guide with the standards for a "High" PC but am having no luck. I am still playing with settings.

From reading the Guide over on Kodi I would have thought the 1070 would be stout enough to carry heavier processing (God knows it cost a king's ransom.) Any suggestions? I am trying to run 4k 24fps. My computer is an ASUS Z170 with i5 6600 processor, 16 GB memory, Windows 7 64, the GTX 1070 and my display is my RS500 JVC Projector.

Thanks for any help.

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Make sure power savings is not enabled in the nvidia control panel for your player application.
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post #28 of 2910 Old 10-13-2016, 05:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billqs View Post
Well, I updated my card from a GTX960 to a GTX1070 so that I could use NNEDI3 for image doubling/etc. (I always use less for chroma.) I am having too long of render times so that I am dropping many frames. I followed the Guide with the standards for a "High" PC but am having no luck. I am still playing with settings.

From reading the Guide over on Kodi I would have thought the 1070 would be stout enough to carry heavier processing (God knows it cost a king's ransom.) Any suggestions? I am trying to run 4k 24fps. My computer is an ASUS Z170 with i5 6600 processor, 16 GB memory, Windows 7 64, the GTX 1070 and my display is my RS500 JVC Projector.

Thanks for any help.
Use super-xbr for chroma upscaling to free up resources for luma doubling. Avoid chroma doubling, as it is a waste of resources.
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post #29 of 2910 Old 10-13-2016, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onkyoman View Post
Use super-xbr for chroma upscaling to free up resources for luma doubling. Avoid chroma doubling, as it is a waste of resources.
You give this advice again, as the this thread's creator, however we still don't know what display you base your comments on. Both the poster and myself have JVC RS series projectors with 4K e-shift for example.. Can you clarify this for us as it makes a lot bigger difference if someone is giving advice based owning a 65" 4K panel vs say 11.5ft CIH setup with a 4K projector. If as Billqs poses, Onkyoman you are indeed Warner who wrote the Kodi guide then I'm a bit perplexed as to why you'd write off NNEDI3 here and not modify the guide to reflect your thoughts more accurately - so perhaps you aren't? Also, wondering if @madshi himself endorses the set up guide on the Kodi Forums? I've also not heard him state NNEDI3 as being a waste of time in any of his posts in the projector threads I'm involved in btw.
For me with the new JVC Z1/4500 on the way with it's full 4K panel, I'll definitely be doing some even more critical testing and tweaking with MadVR which I look forward to.
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Last edited by OzHDHT; 10-13-2016 at 06:19 PM.
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post #30 of 2910 Old 10-13-2016, 05:53 PM
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Thanks for your help. I went with your settings from the Kodi guide for high end. I did lower Chroma Upscaling to super-xbr but with NNEDI3 64 for both both Image Doubling and Image Quadrupling + SuperRes 3 I was getting around 55ms render times. I had to lower it down to NNEDI3 32 and I think I had to lower down the Quadruple to NNEDI. I followed the guide's advice about BiCubic 150 for the Image Downscale down from Jinc where I had it and I finally got the render time dependably around 30-34ms and quit dropping frames. I disabled Chroma doubling as it said to in the Kodi guide.

I ended up with a very detailed but very overcooked looking picture. Maybe the Superres on both doubling and quadrupling was too much? I'm sure I can continue to work with the settings to improve.

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