Is it possible to rip a DVD to a computer without encoding it again? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 9 Old 08-24-2017, 03:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Is it possible to rip a DVD to a computer without encoding it again?

So I have some home movies on VHS-C that I've converted to DVD. To my understanding, that means they've been encoded - transferred from analog to digital. There's a bit of compression here obviously, but there isn't really a way to avoid that, since they need to be converted to digital.

Now, I know there's software like MakeMKV and ByteCopy which transcode DVDs into another digital format, compressing the data once again. My question is - is there any way to simply grab the data off of a DVD without compressing again? If the DVD is already a digital format (MPEG-2, I believe), why do I need to convert it again, and do another round of compression? If someone could explain it to me, that would help a lot.

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Sean
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post #2 of 9 Old 08-24-2017, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seanmcnally View Post
So I have some home movies on VHS-C that I've converted to DVD. To my understanding, that means they've been encoded - transferred from analog to digital. There's a bit of compression here obviously, but there isn't really a way to avoid that, since they need to be converted to digital.

Now, I know there's software like MakeMKV and ByteCopy which transcode DVDs into another digital format, compressing the data once again. My question is - is there any way to simply grab the data off of a DVD without compressing again? If the DVD is already a digital format (MPEG-2, I believe), why do I need to convert it again, and do another round of compression? If someone could explain it to me, that would help a lot.

Thanks,
Sean
MakeMKV does not re-compress the video unless you specifically tell it to. It simply take the MPEG-2 DVD video and wrap into a mkv file, retain the original video and audio. This is exactly the tool you want.
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post #3 of 9 Old 08-24-2017, 04:32 PM
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That is true. MakeMKV just wraps the original streams into a new (mkv) container. The process is lossless.

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post #4 of 9 Old 08-25-2017, 06:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxbat121 View Post
MakeMKV does not re-compress the video unless you specifically tell it to.
Actually, you can't tell it to. MakeMKV has no facility to re-compress anything. Just rip and re-pack into MKV. I use it for all my DVD's. Re-compession requires another utility, like Handbrake, for example.

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post #5 of 9 Old 08-25-2017, 10:08 AM
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You can also copy the DVD to your computer as an iso file. Many players will use that just the same as a DVD.

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post #6 of 9 Old 08-25-2017, 04:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seanmcnally View Post
is there any way to simply grab the data off of a DVD without compressing again?
Yup. The files on the DVD can be copied to your PC. Then can be played by VLC or other. Was this a trick question?
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post #7 of 9 Old 08-26-2017, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by grittree View Post
Was this a trick question?
No, but you gave kind of a trick answer. The files on the DVD are encrypted. VLC can play them because it has DCSS built in to decrypt on the fly. This is by no means a general solution as most other utilities do no have DCSS built in to handle encrypted DVD files.

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post #8 of 9 Old 08-26-2017, 09:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post
No, but you gave kind of a trick answer. The files on the DVD are encrypted. VLC can play them because it has DCSS built in to decrypt on the fly. This is by no means a general solution as most other utilities do no have DCSS built in to handle encrypted DVD files.
If it was DVDs that were converted from VHS, then they most likely aren't encrypted.
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post #9 of 9 Old 08-26-2017, 10:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajhieb View Post
If it was DVDs that were converted from VHS, then they most likely aren't encrypted.
Yes, you are quite correct. I didn't recall from the OP that he was referring to personal content captured onto DVD.
My bad. @grittree

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