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post #30121 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 03:01 PM
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TV Commentary
How ‘Wolf Hall’ will entertain millions — and threaten to distort history in the process
By Gregory Wolfe, The Washington Post - April 5, 2015 at 4:56 PM
EXCERPT
When the BBC miniseries “Wolf Hall” debuts on Masterpiece tonight, the American public will once again be enthralled by a superb British costume drama. Think “Downton Abbey” and “House of Cards” with a King Henry VIII twist.
Based on award-winning novels by Hilary Mantel, the series chronicles the political and religious intrigues surrounding King Henry VIII’s effort to divorce his first wife, Katherine of Aragon, and marry Anne Boleyn.
This is well-worn, if fertile, ground for historical drama. What makes “Wolf Hall” fresh and distinctive, however, is its choice of protagonist —Thomas Cromwell, who rises from humble origins to become Henry’s chief minister.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/a...n-the-process/
'Wolf Hall Is Finally Returning for Season 2'

Quote:
Wolf Hall fans, the long awaited day has arrived. The BBC's director of content Charlotte Moore confirmed to Radio Times that an adaptation of Hilary Mantel's The Mirror and the Light is in the works as a sequel to the 2015 series.
https://www.townandcountrymag.com/le...hall-season-2/

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post #30122 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 03:15 PM
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My desktops and my HTPC are Win7 and will stay that way as long as possible. Ditto my wife's laptop (a hand-me-down from.. me). I had a Dell Win 8 laptop I tried to move to Win 10. Something in Win 10 shut off the fan and I fried three motherboards. Sold it for parts. We had an XP laptop that stayed here in FL. Met the qualifications, so I tried to do IT. Something went sideways and now the display shows two instances of the screen divided horizontally across the middle. It's that way at boot, so unlikely there's a fix. So, that's two laptops Win 10 ruined, IMO.

OTOH, I have three newer Lenovo laptops I got knowing Win 10 would be pre-installed. They worked beautifully out-of-the-box, but the first Windows Feature update was a bit of a trainwreck for the first one. Took me weeks to fix what Windows broke. With each major "feature update," something goes haywire in one of them and I spend hours figuring it out.

I AM happy that the next "version" of Win 10 (1903) will restore the ability to halt automatic updates. That said, I'm dreading the update, itself.

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post #30123 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 03:20 PM - Thread Starter
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TV Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jun. 2, 2019

LUTHER
BBC America, 8:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
This excellent crime series, starring Idris Elba as intense investigator John Luther, has been dormant for five years. But now, thank goodness, it’s back, and it arrives with a surprise: Ruth Wilson, who played sexy killer Alice Morgan, is back as well. And that’s a surprise, because we last saw her character at the end of Season 3 in 2013. When Season 4 began, she and John Luther had gotten together and broken apart (all of it out of sight of TV audiences), and he spent much of Season 4 mourning her death. But, as it happens, she’s very much alive. And their sexual attraction and odd dynamic may seem more familiar now, thanks to the subsequent character interplay between killer and investigator in Killing Eve

DOWNTON ABBEY RETURNS!
PBS, 9:00 p.m. ET
SPECIAL:
This is a public TV pledge special, which means it’s just as likely to be shown on another night and time as during this suggested national airing. But find it, and revel in it. Hosted by Jim Carter (pictured), who played the butler Mr. Carson in all six seasons of Downton Abbey on PBS. And he’s not through yet: A new Downton Abbey movie is in production now for release this September, and this special includes a sneak preview of it – as well as scenes from the six seasons of the TV series. Watch for Dan Stevens, now starring on FX’s Legion, as Matthew Crawley. Check local listings.

BILLIONS
Showtime, 9:00 p.m. ET

Taylor has gone hard after Wendy, whose professional standing is now in question. And the question is, how will Axe retaliate to protect Wendy?

THE WEEKLY
FX, 10:00 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
With podcasts and now this new FX series, The New York Times has explored ways to extend its reach and footprint, while telling stories – or telling stories about the way it gathers its stories – in new media platforms. Each episode of The Weekly focuses on one story, and one reporter or group of reporters, starting with tonight’s premiere.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

TV Review (Cable)
'Luther' and Alice Morgan Are Back
By David Hinckley, TVWorthWatching.com's 'All Along the Watchtower' - Jun. 2, 2019

The passage of time hasn’t made life any easier for John Luther. Bad news for him, good news for us.

Idris Elba’s tormented detective has returned to television after a three-year absence, with a four-episode fifth season of Luther that premieres Sunday at 8 p.m. ET on BBC America.

He’s still got the topcoat and yup, there’s another psychotic killer out there in London, daring Luther to track him down. Or track her down.

Luther has been admirably gender-neutral in its psychos, speaking of which it’s no spoiler to acknowledge that Ruth Wilson returns as Alice Morgan.

That’s welcome news for us viewers, though we can be pretty sure it will complicate Luther’s life. Alice takes the concept of frenemy to new levels whenever she shows up.
Alice sat out the fourth season, and to be honest, it left a hole where some anguished trauma should have been.

Not that Luther ever has a shortage of anguished trauma. In this new series, Luther gets accosted by a gang of Mob thugs with a cryptic message, and soon thereafter he revisits his shady old friend George Cornelius (Patrick Malahide). Off we go.

Meanwhile, murders have started – modern-day Jack the Ripper stuff, where bodies are surgically mutilated.

Luther also has a new partner, DS Catherine Halliday (Wunmi Mosaku). She hangs back at first, clearly trying to figure this guy out at the same time she’s practicing strategic deference. We like her, and there are indications she will become a force as things roll forward.

Right up front, we see she has a high tolerance for looking at mutilated bodies.

The first break in the murder case comes with an unlikely and intriguing twist. A psychotherapist named Vivien Lake (Hermione Norris, whom Elba fans may remember from working alongside him on The Wire) comes forward to tell Luther she has a patient, Jeremy Lake (Enzo Cilenti), who might be of interest.

Given the fact that the confidentiality of doctor-patient relationships has been a barrier to thousands of previous TV detectives in their search for psychotic perps, Vivien’s move seems a little puzzling to everyone.

So we’ve got several squirrely characters to track, even as we get an extended creepy sequence in which an unseen stalker follows a woman onto a nearly empty bus late at night.

Add Alice to the equation, somewhere, and you’ve got a dense, fascinating mystery. Director Jamie Payne also shows an expert hand at building tension and menace without resorting to visually graphic brutality. He lets that part develop in our imaginations.

Elba slips effortlessly back into Luther, with all his restless energy. His world brings him endless trouble and he can’t leave it, meaning that like Sisyphus, he rolls the rock back up the hill every day knowing it will roll right back down that night.

And in the morning, Alice rolled right down with it.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogP...x?postId=18298
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post #30124 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 03:34 PM
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Hell will freeze over before I'll buy/install Win10.
WoW!! I've installed it in my eleven machines at home. Most were updated as soon as Win10 was available. It's been extremely solid these years I've been using it. Easily the best Windows I've used.
I certainly would not want to go back to WIndows 8.1, or worse WIndows 7.

I was so glad when we finally updated to WIndows 10 at work, earlier this Spring. Much better than the WIndows 7 we were using.
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post #30125 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 04:19 PM
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Then one night they did an update and it caused me to lose everything. I was able to get it back up and running and was able to save everything until it crashed again the next day.

Lot of people hate Win10 because of the update policy. Knowledgeable users now have a program that lets you screen the updates and choose which to install. Called "sledgehammer" and available at majorgeeks.
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post #30126 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 04:19 PM
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Count me in the camp of Win10 being the most stable version of Windows I've used in quite a while. I've got it on 3 machines with no issues other than an occasional Wacom Tablet driver issue. The Wacom tablet is at least 15 years old.
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post #30127 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 05:11 PM
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This site is called Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information Where does your like or dislike of windows 10 fit into the comments? You want to like or dislike a TV show, network, etc but Windows 10 comments IMHO do not belong here.
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post #30128 of 30890 Old 06-02-2019, 10:15 PM
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Hey, it's a slow night and even the Mod is in on the discussion...

Never had any really problems with Win 10, just seems a bit slow and kludgey on my systems. Some are fairly new, some are older. My issue I feel is lack of memory, but with Linux I do not have the issues, so instead of spending hundreds of $$ on memory I'll just stick with Linux.
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post #30129 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 05:00 AM
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I have Windows 10 on 3 machines: a desktop, a laptop and a tablet. All work fine.

My only two complaints are that with every version, Microsoft seems to like to hide more and more settings to the point it's become a pain to customize things. At the same time, they've taken away certain customizations that allow me to place things where I want and can find them quickly. It means I have to use the stupid search bar all the F'ing time to find things I should be able to just have readily available.

The Hell, man....

If I wanted my Start menu alphabetized, I'd choose the option in the settings.....oh wait.....

I really miss the old style Start menu that you could customize to place everything you use in easy reach. I got away with keeping it in Windows 7 by installing "Classic Start Menu", but that doesn't look possible anymore. I really hate the stupid tiles.
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post #30130 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by kjpjr View Post
This site is called Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information Where does your like or dislike of windows 10 fit into the comments? You want to like or dislike a TV show, network, etc but Windows 10 comments IMHO do not belong here.
You might be surprised to learn how many AVSers access content via Windows devices, so it's at least mildly relevant, though we all tend to carry such topics on a little too long, yours truly included. Though I often go back and remove posts to clean it up.

A lot of us stick with Windows 7 just because of Windows Media Center or other hardware/software that simply doesn't function with Windows 10. And none of it works with a Mac. Just about all of my viewing, OTA and Satellite, gets recorded to a Win 7 machine, then ported to VideoReDo to excise commercial breaks and convert to a format that's streamable to any device. If I'm not in the home theater room, viewing is done either on a laptop, a laptop connected to a display, a tablet or a phone - all using VLC on some flavor of ...Windows. Sounds far clunkier than it is, but the system I built from scratch 7 years ago still far exceeds anything commercially available, today. Win 10 will break a lot of it.

So, to that extent, the sunsetting of Windows 7 is important. This is a forum dedicated more to gear than to content, so gear is just as important in this thread as it pertains to television.

But, yeah, probably ought to take the discussion to the HTPC area should it go on too long.
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post #30131 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 06:53 AM
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You might be surprised to learn how many AVSers access content via Windows devices, so it's at least mildly relevant, though we all tend to carry such topics on a little too long, yours truly included. Though I often go back and remove posts to clean it up.
I think this discussion is 100% on topic, no cleanup required. It all started with a Microsoft security article Dad posted in this thread. We should be able to discuss the articles posted here and how it affects our daily lives.
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post #30132 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 10:35 AM - Thread Starter
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TV/Production Notes (Streaming)
Netflix partners with Avengers: Endgame directors for Magic: The Gathering animated series
By Julia Alexander, TheVerge.com - Jun. 3, 2019

Joe and Anthony Russo are heading back to the small screen for a new Netflix animated series based on the popular card game Magic: The Gathering.

The Russo brothers (Avengers: Infinity War, Avengers: Endgame) are teaming up with Netflix, Wizards of the Coast, and Hasbro to oversee the series. The show will “expand on the stories of the Planeswalkers, which are Magic’s unique magic-wielding heroes and villains,” according to a press release from Netflix. The company didn’t confirm how many episodes the first season will contain.

“We have been huge fans and players of Magic: The Gathering for as long as it has been around, so being able to help bring these stories to life through animation is a true passion project for us,” the Russo brothers said in a joint statement.

Henry Gilroy (Star Wars: The Clone Wars) and Jose Molina (The Tick) will serve as showrunners, according to Netflix. Bardel Entertainment, the animation studio behind Adult Swim’s Rick and Morty, will also contribute to the series.

Magic: The Gathering was first introduced in 1993, and it has amassed more than 38 million players around the world. Multiple books about the card game’s mythology have been released over the years.

Netflix didn’t announce a release date for the series.

https://www.theverge.com/2019/6/3/18...russo-brothers
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post #30133 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 10:39 AM - Thread Starter
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Nielsen Overnights (Broadcast)
NBA Finals Game 2 Ratings Fall From 2018; Warriors Top Raptors With Obama In The House
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Jun. 3, 2019

Game 2 of the 2019 NBA Finals on Sunday was a lot like the first matchup between the Toronto Raptors and the Golden State Warriors, at least when it comes to the ratings. To paraphrase Martha Stewart, that’s not a good thing in what is shaping up to be the lowest-rated series in a decade.

On the court, however, things were on fire — especially for the Warriors in the second half. Although the current champions again played without the injured Kevin Durant, and Klay Thompson had to exit the court due to a very painful landing, the Warriors rallied from their Game 1 defeat last week. With their defense now solid against the Canadian team and a third-quarter push that included an 18-0 run, the two-time defending champion Bay Area crew showed everyone exactly why they have all that hardware at home with a 109-104 victory in Toronto.

The NBA Finals are now tied 1-1 heading into Wednesday’s Game 3 in Oakland.

And there was a former POTUS in the house as the guest of the hometown team.

When Barack Obama was called out on the jumbotron in the arena, the 44th President was given a standing ovation and subjected to hearty chants of “MVP, MVP, MVP!”

However, for a series that came out of the gate down double digits in the ratings from last year, last night early ratings were another defeat for the league and ABC. Metered market ratings have Game 2 scoring a 10.2/19 for last night’ standoff in the 6ix.

Similar to the decade low of Game 1, that’s a stinging 20% pratfall from the early metrics of Game 2 of the 2018 NBA Finals. With two American markets to be measured, unlike this year, that June 2, 2018 game saw the Warriors pound LeBron James and the 2016 NBA champs the Cleveland Cavaliers 122-103.

Obviously Durant, Steph Curry and team went on to win that series, and that second game drew a TV crowd of 18.5 million for the Disney-owned network. Even with 2019 final viewership figures still delayed by Nielsen, those kind of numbers are clearly not happening this time around. Right now, Game 2 looks to be hovering just below how Game 2 of the 2014 NBA Finals, when the Miami Heat played the series-winning San Antonio Spurs. We will see later if that remains the status quo when final results come in.

In fact, while up from Game 1 as is traditional in the NBA Finals, Game 2 of the 2019 matchup rose less than 1% from this year’s May 30 opener. That’s significantly less than in past years game-to-game.

Looking at 18-49 demographic data across the 56 markets measured, the 6.5/26 average of last night’s Game 2 declined almost 25% from last year’s comparable game.

We’ll update with more NBA Finals numbers when we get them as well as look at the results of the rest of a repeat heavy primetime.

https://deadline.com/2019/06/barack-...bc-1202625785/
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post #30134 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 10:46 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Notes (Cable)

Donald Trump Suggests Americans Stop Using AT&T to Force ‘Big Changes’ at CNN
By Jon Levine, TheWrap.com - Jun. 3, 2019

Donald Trump urged his supporters on Monday to stop using AT&T, saying if people dropped the telecommunications company, coverage of him on CNN would become better.

“I believe that if people stoped [sic] using or subscribing to @ATT , they would be forced to make big changes at @cnn , which is dying in the ratings anyway,” Trump tweeted. “It is so unfair with such bad, Fake News! Why wouldn’t they act. When the World watches @cnn , it gets a false picture of USA. Sad!”

The post came shortly after Trump touched down in the United Kingdom for his second official visit to the country during his presidency.

It’s unclear what prompted the president’s latest outburst toward the company, but Trump has long been a critic of the network, which he routinely denigrates on Twitter as “fake news.” He has also referred to CNN (and other network) reporters as “enemies of the people.”

A rep for AT&T declined to comment, a rep for CNN did not immediately respond to request comment.

It’s the first time the president has urged his more than 60 million Twitter followers to go after the network’s parent company as a pressure tactic. Last June, AT&T formally acquired CNN as as part of a broader acquisition of Time Warner. The deal was a painful one. The Trump Justice Department repeatedly tried to block the merger on anti-trust grounds — while critics insisted the government’s position was really just motivated by the president’s personal dislike of CNN.

The acquisition of 21st Century Fox by Disney, completed around the same time, met with no resistance from the Justice Department.

Since being elected president in 2016, the president has routinely made a punching bag of CNN, saving particular ire for the network’s White House correspondent Jim Acosta. In November, Trump revoked Acosta’s press credentials after a particularly nasty exchange in the White House. A full scale lawsuit was averted after the president backed down. The point has been mostly moot as Press Secretary Sarah Sanders has not held briefing since March.

https://www.thewrap.com/donald-trump...hanges-at-cnn/
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post #30135 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 10:52 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Review (Cable)
‘Perpetual Grace, LTD.’ on Epix
By Daniel D'Addario, Variety.com - Jun. 3, 2019

MGM-owned premium cable network Epix has, for a few years, been working to define itself as an outlet for original programming. Their latest attempt, “Perpetual Grace, LTD.,” seeks the audience’s favor by cloaking itself both the familiar. The show’s cast includes familiar faces like Jimmi Simpson of “Westworld,” Terry O’Quinn of “Lost,” and Oscar nominees Sir Ben Kingsley and Jacki Weaver; its giddy amorality-in-the-American-sticks formula seems borrowed from “Ozark,” which itself owes a debt to “Breaking Bad.” (Both that late-2000s noir and this one, a decade later, are set in the deserts of New Mexico, which feels like no coincidence.) Little here feels new, and it’s not a skillful enough pastiche to demand you find Epix on your dial.

Simpson plays a con artist who seeks to ensnare a pair of religious leaders who seem like easy marks; he plans to have them kidnapped so that he can pretend to be their son and enrich himself with their life insurance. While Simpson’s James easily meshes into this couple’s lives (aided by their actual son, a floundering ne’er-do-well played by Damon Herriman) he comes to discover that the pastor and his wife are more formidable than he’d initially believed.

All of which makes for the outset of a compelling enough noir, if one indebted, too, to “Fargo” — but the telling is all. “Perpetual Grace” relies on lugubrious and lengthy flashbacks shot in black-and-white, so exaggeratedly haunted that heavy-handed veins of quirk, when they surface, seem less like counterpoint and more like jarring, unpleasant contrast. And Kingsley’s Pastor Brown is so obviously containing sociopathic multitudes, thanks to a performance with little shading over its tough, aggressive venom, that the story lacks suspense.

“Perpetual Grace” is a shot at accomplishing something that’s been accomplished already, many times, elsewhere: Launching a dark antihero drama in which the concept of self-interest is practically a character itself. But familiarity breeds contempt, particularly when what’s familiar is contempt — the sneering, preening tone struck by characters distinguished by nastiness and little more. To find the next “Breaking Bad” — which is to say, the next drama that breaks out in a big way — networks should start by building shows that look nothing like “Breaking Bad” at all.

“Perpetual Grace, LTD.” Epix. June 2.
Ten episodes (two screened for review).


https://variety.com/2019/tv/reviews/...on-1203230101/
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post #30136 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 11:01 AM - Thread Starter
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TV/Business Notes (Cable)

‘The Walking Dead’ Threatens To Leave Georgia After Ten Years Due To Abortion Law
By Paul Tassi, Forbes.com

Money talks, and a number of networks and media megacorps are using their pull to threaten to remove their filming dollars from the state of Georgia if a newly signed, highly restrictive abortion law actually goes into effect.

The list of companies threatening to leave Georgia, which has long been a hotbed of TV and movie production due to its tax credits, is growing, and now includes the likes of CBS, NBC, Viacom, Sony and AMC.

That last one will catch the attention of fans of The Walking Dead, as Georgia has been home base for the series for its entire run stretching back all the way to 2010. While the show has mostly left Georgia behind as a plot location, moving instead to the Virginia/D.C. area mainly, the show still shoots in Georgia to the point where many of the major cast members have bought houses there. Moving the show from Georgia would uproot the entire series in a big way, but that’s how much these media corps are trying to use their muscle to create political change surrounding this law specifically.

The reason the Georgia law is so controversial is not just the fact that it’s about abortion, but because of how restrictive it is. The “heartbeat” bill, as its proponents call it, bans abortions as soon as a fetal heartbeat can be detected, which can be as early as six weeks, before many women even realize they’re pregnant, so this is effectively banning abortion entirely in many cases. But the bill sailed through Georgia’s conservative state legislature and was signed by its conservative governor, Brian Kemp.

What this means for the actual state of abortions in Georgia (the important part) and the fate of all these companies threatening to pull out of the state if it goes into effect (the less important part) depends on what happens next. There is some confusion about what’s actually going on with all these highly restrictive abortion bills being passed in a number of states, namely Georgia, Alabama and Missouri. They are so restrictive that in some cases, they have actually been designed to be deemed unconstitutional in order for them to make their way to the Supreme Court after lower courts strike them down. The idea is that if these laws are looked at by the highest court in the land, and a newly conservative one after adding two Trump appointees, that moves could be made to weaken or ultimately erase Roe V. Wade in the larger national fight against abortion.

But one way or another, this will take time, so the ramifications of this, both in terms of women’s health and the potential for Georgia to lose its entire entertainment industry, will not be clear for some time. Presumably all of these companies have to be willing to follow through if this law is eventually upheld, as there’s no point making threats otherwise, and it would devastate a large portion of Georgia’s economy, given everything that films there from The Conjuring to The Avengers. The Walking Dead is already filming season 10 in its usual Georgia locations, so at the very earliest, this would not be an issue that forces a move until probably the inevitably greenlit season 11.

Here is AMC’s statement on the issue:

"If this highly restrictive legislation goes into effect, we will reevaluate our activity in Georgia," said a spokesperson. "Similar bills — some even more restrictive — have passed in multiple states and have been challenged. This is likely to be a long and complicated fight and we are watching it all very closely."

As they say, this will be long and complicated. And this will likely keep happening across other states with this newfound push happening on a clearly coordinated, national scale.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/paultas.../#86f15aa75d0a
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post #30137 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 11:05 AM - Thread Starter
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TV/Production Notes (Cable)
Nickelodeon Orders 'Crystal Maze' Game Show Based on U.K. Format
By Kimberly Nordyke, The Hollywood Reporter - Jun. 3, 2019

Nickelodeon is bringing the British hit game show The Crystal Maze to the U.S.

The kids cable network said Monday that it's greenlighted a new version of the show that'll be co-produced by Bunim/Murray Productions (The Real World, The Challenge, Born This Way) and RDF Television (Secret Life of 4 Year Olds, Wife Swap, Shipwrecked), all under the BanijayGroup.

The show, touted as a "forerunner to the current escape room craze," has been airing on the U.K. since the mid-'90s, and recently was rebooted with celebrity, charity and family seasons in the U.K., Australia and other territories.

The series centers on a competitive challenge featuring a family team who must utilize physical and mental skills to successfully navigate an elaborate labyrinth of four giant and immersive themed zones.

Nickelodeon's version of will feature a family tackling a range of challenges in zones collectively known as The Crystal Maze. Each successful game is rewarded with a "time crystal" that equals five seconds in the centerpiece Crystal Dome. The adventure culminates in a finale that finds the team entering the Dome to grab a cash prize as it flies around them during a dramatic clock countdown.

Nickelodeon has ordered 10 hourlong episodes; casting is underway, with plans to begin production on the original set in Bristol, England, this summer. The show will feature an as-yet-unnamed host who'll guide the family through each challenge and adventure. The series' premiere date also will be announced at a later date.

"As Nickelodeon embraces co-viewing opportunities for every member of the family, The Crystal Maze brings a new type of action game and storytelling to audiences with its escape room-style gameplay and emphasis on collaboration and teamwork to win," said Rob Bagshaw, executive vp unscripted content at Nickelodeon.

Added Bunim/Murray CEO Gil Goldschein: "The Crystal Maze has long served as a staple of the U.K. entertainment landscape and we could not be happier to be reinventing the show for a younger demo alongside our sister companies, RDF and Stephen David Entertainment. Acting as the first series for BMP's Kids and Family Division, the show will build on our reputation in the competitive game space and we've no doubt by partnering with Nickelodeon, we can build a new audience for this brand in the U.S."

The Crystal Maze is executive produced by Goldschein and Maria Pepin from Bunim/Murray; Neale Simpson from Fizz, part of RDF Television; and Stephen David from Stephen David Entertainment. Bagshaw oversees production for Nickelodeon.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/li...format-1215142
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TV/Critic's Notes (Cable)
Plenty of Fantasy in HBO’s ‘Chernobyl,’ but the Truth Is Real
Ahead of the series finale, a science writer who has toured the site of the 1986 nuclear disaster weighs in.
By Henry Fountain, The New York Times - Jun. 2, 2019

Henry Fountain is a science writer on the Climate desk of The New York Times. He toured the Chernobyl plant and the exclusion zone around it in 2014.

The first thing to understand about the HBO mini-series “Chernobyl,” which concludes its five-part run on Monday, is that a lot of it is made up. But here’s the second, and more important, thing: It doesn’t really matter.

The explosion and fire at Chernobyl’s Unit 4 reactor on April 26, 1986, was an extraordinarily messy and grim event, a radioactive “dirty” bomb on a scale that no one — certainly not anyone in the Soviet Union — was prepared for. It remains the worst disaster in the history of nuclear power, killing more than 30 people initially (and more in the years that followed, though the numbers are much disputed) and spreading radioactive contamination across large swaths of Soviet and European territory.

In the immediate panicked aftermath, and in the months of crisis and confusion until the completion seven months later of the concrete-and-steel sarcophagus that entombed the reactor’s lethal remains, the heroes and villains numbered in the hundreds, and the supporting cast in the hundreds of thousands.

The producers of the mini-series don’t sanitize the disaster (sometimes the gore even goes a little too far: The radiation victims are often covered in blood for some reason). Instead, they simplify. They leave the grim alone, but the demands of Hollywood, and of production budgets, take a toll on the messy.

That’s not to say there aren’t many touches of verisimilitude. The rooftop scene in which conscripts have just seconds to toss radioactive debris to the ground is as otherworldly as it must have seemed to those who were there three decades ago. And the Unit 4 control room is faithfully re-created, from the control-rod dials on the walls to the white coats and caps worn by the operators. (When I visited the adjacent Unit 3 control room five years ago, I had to wear the same odd outfit, which seemed more appropriate for a bakery than a nuclear power plant.)

But if you didn’t know much about Chernobyl you could be forgiven if, after watching, you thought the entire response and cleanup was run by two people, Valery Legasov and Boris Shcherbina, aided valiantly by a third, Ulana Khomyuk.

You could also be forgiven if you thought they were all real characters. Legasov and Shcherbina were real, though their roles were twisted and amplified to meet the script’s need to keep things moving. Khomyuk, on the other hand, was made out of whole cloth, and her actions strain credulity, from traveling to Chernobyl, uninvited, to investigate the accident to being in the presence of Mikhail Gorbachev at the Kremlin not much later.

There are the brave, doomed firefighters, ignorant of the radiation hazards they encountered (though nobody climbed up over the reactor debris, as portrayed in the series; they were working the roof to prevent fires from spreading to the undamaged Unit 3). The plucky, can-do miners, brought in to excavate under the reactor to stop the meltdown, stripping naked to get the job done (the series doesn’t say this, but their work ended up largely for naught). The no-nonsense helicopter pilots, risking radiation sickness to drop their loads of lead, boron and sand on the reactor (while one helicopter did crash, killing its crew, the accident happened months later, and radiation had nothing to do with it).

I could go on. Don’t get me started about that blue light from the exposed reactor shining high into the night sky in the first episode. Yes, nuclear reactors can produce a blue hue, from something called Cherenkov radiation, but no, there’s no way Unit 4 would have looked like the “Tribute in Light” in Lower Manhattan on the anniversary of Sept. 11.

In the end, though, none of this really matters. For the mini-series gets a basic truth right — that the Chernobyl disaster was more about lies, deceit and a rotting political system than it was about bad engineering or abysmal management and training (or, for that matter, about whether nuclear power is inherently good or bad).

Workers on the show in protective gear. After the disaster, radioactive contamination spread across large swaths of Soviet and European territory.

Workers on the show in protective gear. After the disaster, radioactive contamination spread across large swaths of Soviet and European territory.CreditLiam Daniel/HBO
“Chernobyl” is grim only partly because of all the destruction and death. The need to constantly lie (or cope with the lies of higher-ups) weighs on its characters as heavily as all the lead that was dropped on the reactor.

Yes, this basic truth is simplified, too, especially in the final episode, which portrays the trial of three power plant officials.

I don’t want to give away much about these scenes, though I will reveal that the geeky term “positive void coefficient” — one of the reactor’s design flaws — was uttered. (As a science writer, I was overjoyed.)

The scenes have a lot of tension, and are among the best in the whole mini-series. But they seem drawn more from American movie courtrooms than from Soviet jurisprudence. The idea of someone speaking truth to power in this court seems about as far-fetched as anything else in the whole of “Chernobyl.”

How the show gets to its truth, however, is less important than that it gets there. Viewers may come away from “Chernobyl” realizing that, together, people and machines can do awful things — like create a nuclear catastrophe for the ages. If they also come away understanding that in this case, that outcome was more the fault of a government and its apparatchiks, so much the better.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/02/a...nobyl-hbo.html

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TV Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jun. 3, 2019

2019 STANLEY CUP FINALS
NBC, 8:00 p.m. ET

After two games in this season’s Stanley Cup Finals, the St. Louis Blues had eked out an overtime win in Game 2 to even the series. In Saturday’s Game 3, the Boston Bruins dominated thoroughly, especially when taking advantage of power-play opportunities, and now has a 2-1 game advantage heading into tonight’s Game 4. Watch, again, for times when the Blues draw a penalty that puts a player off the ice and in the box – and how aggressively the Bruins attack to turn that temporary imbalance into a goal.

PANDORA'S BOX
TCM, 18:00 p.m. ET

This is a rare prime-time showing of German director G.W. Pabst’s 1929 silent film, which presented Louise Brooks as Lulu – a once-innocent showgirl who descends into a whirlpool of sin and depravity, leaving many men (and even a woman or two) in her hedonistic wake. One small but fun footnote: Brooks was an American actress, born in Kansas, who was hired by Pabst and flown to Germany to star in Pandora’s Box. Another, even smaller footnote: On the occasions when Bewitched star Elizabeth Montgomery, who played suburban witch Samantha, also portrayed the dual role of her hedonistic brunette cousin Serena, the credits listed the actress playing Serena not as Elizabeth Montgomery, but as “Pandora Spocks.”


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

TV Review (Cable)
'Fear the Walking Dead' Returns to Life – So to Speak
By David Hinckley, TVWorthWatching.com's 'All Along the Watchtower' - Jun. 2, 2019

Good news: The Fear The Walking Dead gang may finally be pulling it all back together.

Okay, they’re still living in a zombie apocalypse further compromised by bad people who want to kill them. But at least they maybe aren’t just wandering around in a figurative daze any more.

Fear The Walking Dead, which returns for its fifth season starting at 9 p.m. ET Sunday on AMC, spent the last part of its fourth season looking like a kid who had lost his or her parents in a shopping mall.

The death of Madison Clark (Kim Dickens), who had been the leader of the group and the centerpiece of the show, set everybody else adrift. Equally critical for dramatic purposes, it left the show without a focal point or apparent direction.

For whatever reason, the situation was more acute with Fear than it was with The Walking Dead when Rick Grimes vanished. Rick’s departure reshuffled that deck, but at least there were a few leaders and some sort of loose structure.

On Fear, we had Morgan (Lennie James), he of the perpetual moral anguish, and Alicia (Alycia Debnam-Carey), Madison’s daughter, who had been prone to flights of exasperation where she went walkabout. We had John Dorie (Garret Dillahunt), a former cop who is tired of killing. And Althea (Maggie Grace), a shrewd survivor whose obsession is documenting the ZA on video.

Plus Strand (Colman Domingo), a powerful man in the old world who has never quite found his footing in the new one. And June (Jenna Elfman), a nurse with a mysterious backstory and a newfound affection for John.

And let’s not forget Charlie (Alexa Nisenson), a young girl who at times has been Chucky and at other times has seemed like, well, a vulnerable young girl caught up in an evil world.

There are others, too, and collectively they’re an interesting bunch. But they were already nomads back when Madison was around to point them in some direction, and once she was gone, they didn’t seem to quite know what to do or where to go.

At Morgan’s urging late last season, they sort of decided to think positive and do good, like by leaving supplies along the roadside for any survivors who might happen by.

Admirable as that was, it didn’t always add up to a great story. So what’s encouraging about the start of the new season is that the group quickly gets sucked into a serious life-or-death challenge. Whether it will add up to a great story, who knows. The Walking Dead universe has had hits and misses.

But Morgan, Alicia, and company have re-engaged with both dead and undead adversaries, and that’s a good start.

We also get some indications the leadership quandary has begun to sort itself out – mostly in the ways we might have expected, but with a few potentially interesting wrinkles.

Among other things, the new season starts with more action than the last season ended. That’s also good. There were times toward the end of last season when the characters seemed to be walking around almost like, well, zombies.

So perhaps it’s fitting that real zombies help wake them up – though here again, as the Walking Dead universe repeatedly reminds us, the most insidious dangers always come from the living.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogP...x?postId=18299
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TV/Critic's Notes
TV’s Reckoning with #MeToo
Many creators are visibly struggling to adjust to the changing landscape, rejecting the “very special episode” path and seeking something more honest and original.
By Emily Nussbaum, New Yorker - Jun. 3, 2019 Issue

“Tuca and Bertie,” a new animated series on Netflix, was created by Lisa Hanawalt, an illustrator for the dark Hollywood satire “BoJack Horseman.” Like “BoJack,” it’s set in a trippy universe full of visual puns and talking animals—mostly birds, although there are also chain-smoking trees and gossipy cats, not to mention a breast that pops off one character’s chest, puts on a flowered hat, and wanders away in a huff. The heroines of the show, a sweet, loopy friendship sitcom, are a raunchy toucan named Tuca (voiced by Tiffany Haddish) and her best friend, an anxious parakeet named Bertie (Ali Wong). Childlike in style, with adult themes, the series plays out through a scrim of surreal frames, showing ordinary actions—from baking to sex—through odd filters, from retro video games to yarn dolls that illustrate a painful memory. It’s an imperfect show about feeling off-kilter, struggling to comprehend your own life.

It’s also the latest in a deluge of TV series that feel like a direct response to the #MeToo movement, touching on third-rail themes that are meant not merely to comfort or inspire but to unsettle. In one of “Tuca and Bertie” ’s central story lines (which I’ll spoil here, so bail if you care about that kind of thing), Bertie, who is working as a corporate cog at a magazine company called Condé Nest, gets her dream gig, as an after-hours apprentice to the celebrity baker Pastry Pete, a brilliant penguin who created a cruller/bundt-cake hybrid called the “crunt.” “He’s got the body of a tenure-track professor but the arms of an adjunct,” Bertie tells herself, deep in a confusing crush.

But, from her first day on the job, Bertie is thrown off by her boss’s haughty air, his demands that she say “Yes, Chef” and never question him. Earlier, she’d attended a female-empowerment meeting, after getting sexually harassed at her day job. (That was the day that her breast popped off her body, leaving a black hole in her chest.) But Bertie blindly obeys Pete’s orders. Maybe this is how chefs are supposed to behave? Pete beckons her to the stove, to inspect a banana roux that he’s preparing. Then he pushes Bertie’s head down, so that the steam hits her face as she struggles to free herself. It’s a deeply weird act—hard to describe, let alone to define.

Bertie runs into the bathroom, shoves her hand down her pants, and masturbates. In the aftermath, she has disturbing sexual dreams about her boss, and they make her feel stupid and crazy. Pete is an abusive creep, but he’s also her role model and her route to career success. When Pete hires a new apprentice, a chipper millennial named Dakota (“With a Y—the Y is silent . . . and invisible”), Bertie and the younger songbird bond. Then, one day, Pete does the same thing to Dakota, as Bertie looks on, saying nothing. When Dakota asks Bertie if it ever happened to her, she stutters, making excuses: “You don’t understand—it’s just part of the job and how he teaches. He’s very passionate.”

“Why are you defending him?” Dakota yells. “And you didn’t warn me. You knew what he did was wrong, right?” In some sense, however, it seems as if Bertie didn’t know, until she saw someone else’s reaction to Pete’s behavior. When Dakota quits, it sends Bertie spinning, grappling with childhood memories, and with the blurred lines between authority and abuse, flirtation and exploitation.

It’s a powerful story, precisely because it doesn’t leave out the discomfort. Like much of Hanawalt’s work, in her illustrated cartoon books as well as on “BoJack Horseman,” “Tuca and Bertie” is at its best when it lingers on raw sensations. Sex is confusing; power is, too. Tuca, who is newly sober, can’t figure out how to behave on a date, because her default mode is binge-drinking and blacking out. Even after Bertie quits her apprenticeship, her rage and guilt are never resolved—and, although a bird poops on Pete’s head and Tuca entraps him with a viral video, he suffers no major repercussions. He stays a star chef.

“Tuca and Bertie” is a wave in a sea of such responses. In some cases, older shows have rewritten themselves, reinterpreting stories that once seemed romantic or funny, finding darker undercurrents and new angles. In series ranging from “Fosse/Verdon,” FX’s Broadway-musical-antihero show, to Gen Z soaps like Freeform’s “Good Trouble” and “The Bold Type,” as well as on network sitcoms like “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” and cable dramedies like “Barry,” creators are visibly adjusting to, and at times struggling with, the changing landscape.

Television has always been a delivery system for morality. In 1977, Edith Bunker fought off an attempted rape (and Archie never called her “dingbat” again); in 1989, on “A Different World,” Dwayne Wayne learned about consent. These stories, which were packaged as “very special episodes,” were regularly treated as big cultural events—maybe because they stood in striking contrast to the way sexual violence was portrayed on crime shows and soaps, which tended to be hardboiled or lurid. Sometimes, as in the wildly popular Luke-and-Laura romance on the soap opera “General Hospital,” rape was more like an act of passionate overkill, a bump on the road to true love.

Meanwhile, workplace harassment was framed as romance or slapstick—the boss chasing his secretary around the desk, a current that ran under even beloved shows like “m*a*s*h” and “Cheers.” The “very special episode” was aggressively well intentioned, a wholesome corrective. But even the best of them were polemical gestures, not artistic ones. As Samuel Goldwyn once put it, about movies and morality, “If you want to send a message, call Western Union”—and television, in the public imagination, was Western Union.

When Dr. Melfi was raped, in a parking-garage stairwell, on “The Sopranos,” in 2001, it marked a turning point. This wasn’t because the scene was particularly graphic but because Melfi was a central character in the show. Most effectively, the plot was about what didn’t happen—Melfi never asked Tony to exact revenge, a quiet ethical choice in a show about moral corruption. The episode, which startled viewers and created enormous buzz, seemed to embolden TV creators. In the two decades that followed, plotlines about sexual violence proliferated, often serving as the backstory for characters. This phenomenon occurred in tandem with an increase in shows created by women: when women’s lives are taken seriously, sexual violence is part of the drama. But there was an ugliness in what became a narrative arms race, with its own clichés; for creators, merely showing violent misogyny, however shoddily, sometimes seemed to double as a signifier of artistic seriousness. On the first season of “True Detective,” a flayed and ravaged female corpse was an object to be gazed at in horror, but there wasn’t much difference between what the camera ogled and what it critiqued.

* * * *

These recent shows mark a different kind of progress—an outward sign of inward changes, as if anxious debates within writers’ rooms have flowed into scripts. With few exceptions, these stories aren’t prechewed moral lessons or easy fables about heroism, and they aren’t engaging in “Game of Thrones”-style escalation, either, turning harassment stories into pornographic melodrama. Not every such plot is successful: a few feel tone-deaf or overly cynical. But the sharpest are reshaping television’s boundaries, more often through comedy than through drama.

The two clear standouts pre-dated the movement: the brilliant first season of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s “Fleabag,” from 2016, which began with a disastrous bank-loan interview with a sexual harasser and ended with a complex détente with the same man; and the crazily great fifth season of Raphael Bob-Waksberg’s “BoJack Horseman,” which was written during the summer of 2017 and was a scathing deconstruction of the making of a cable antihero drama called “Philbert.” Both shows were written into the #MeToo movement, but, as good art so often does, they mirrored the central anxieties of the age: blinding fury at what men get away with and desperation for some path to forgiveness, along with an ugly awareness of how those two impulses might contradict each other.

The shows that followed vary widely. But, in the aggregate, showrunners have taken odd, rude, and often daring routes into the conversation, upending clichés instead of replicating them, seeking new perspectives on the subject of workplace exploitation. As with Bertie, on “Tuca and Bertie,” women on these shows are enablers as well as victims, and sometimes both. Often, these stories feature characters reëxamining complicated experiences, struggling to see things in a new way. Most significantly, these plots are not so much about individuals as they are about the systems around them, and the troubling sensation of recognizing a bad pattern by seeing that you are part of it.

On the second season of “glow,” the Netflix series about female wrestlers in the nineteen-eighties, Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie) is hit on by the head of her show’s network—and, when she refuses to sleep with him, he pulls the show from prime time and her best friend berates her for her naïveté, arguing that it was her job to string him along. (Ruth’s boss takes her side, maybe because he resents authority more than he resents women.) The scabrous satire “Veep,” on HBO, featured #NotMe , a movement of women publicly declaring that they’d never dated the revolting Presidential candidate Jonah Ryan—and then ended with a plot in which Selina Meyer weaponizes a #MeToo scandal to undermine an opponent. Several comedies have experimented with parodic gender switches. In an arc on the NBC sitcom “Great News,” the C.E.O. played by Tina Fey pretends to harass her staff, in a vain attempt to get the kind of golden parachute that her male colleagues have received. Others have built cynical comic engines from #MeToo , like a plot on the sourpuss FX romance “You’re the Worst” in which Gretchen (Aya Cash) accuses a colleague of harassment in order to snag his office—only to find that she’s perceived as heroic, since he actually was a predator.

On the dark marital comedy “Catastrophe,” the persnickety Irish teacher Sharon, in the wake of #MeToo , is perpetually infuriated: she gripes about misogyny, complains about her husband’s bro-ish new boss, and sees sexism everywhere. But when Rob, the husband, has the chance to stand up for a female colleague who’s being elbowed out, an act that would put a promotion at risk, Sharon insists that he take the promotion. In a moral crunch, she’s not interested in integrity; her stance threatens their marriage and Rob’s wobbly sense that she’s a decent person.

I could go on. It’s difficult to find a recent show that hasn’t reflected questions of abuse and consent. On some of them, #MeToo ’s presence is more about lingering references to the anxiety of the era, as with the sitcom “The Other Two” ’s faux-solemn refrain “In the current climate.” Other series have merely “hung a lamp on it,” the writers’-room term for pointing to a problem instead of fixing it. But, in the past two years, many series—like “Good Trouble,” which built a layered plot around a bubbly engineer, Mariana, joining a sexist dot-com—have found stirring material not in pure go-girl clichés but in the messy drama of a system in flux.

* * * *

Some of the most striking adjustments have happened on shows, like “Good Trouble,” with romantic-comedy structures, whose premises rely on workplace sparks. The second season of “Jane the Virgin,” on the CW, which began in 2015—an aeon ago, politically—included a sexy arc in which Jane dated her writing professor, Professor Chavez. In a fourth-season episode, in 2018, the writers revised that story, by having Jane struggle with retrospective unease about that long-ago flirtation. What could easily have been an after-school special dwelled instead in ambiguities. At first, Jane, who approaches Chavez to see if he can help her get a teaching job, sees their involvement as an electric transgression. But when she learns that he’s dating another grad student—that it’s a pattern—it suddenly seems skeevy. She tries to warn the woman, who perceives Jane’s chatter as a come-on. (It doesn’t help that Jane trips and accidentally grabs the woman’s breasts.) In the end, Chavez seems scared of Jane, and she’s left in a melancholy state. “At least I said my piece,” she tells her mother, with a shrug.

“Younger,” a sweet, smart show on TV Land, which premièred in 2015, faced a tougher set of circumstances. By 2017, the show’s entire premise looked like romanticized harassment, centered as it was on the chemistry between Liza, a millennial publishing assistant (who was secretly in her forties, but still), and her company’s rich, powerful, middle-aged C.E.O., Charles. With their power differential suddenly lit up in neon, the show wisely embraced the theme rather than paper over the contradictions. First, the writers took a preëxisting character—a George R. R. Martin-esque fantasy writer—and exposed him as a creep, by taking seriously the horny advances that the show had once sold as jokes. Then it added gravity to the dynamic of its main romance, showing how it affected the rest of the office. By the final moments of the fifth season, the C.E.O. had agreed, strategically, but also as a gesture of love and sacrifice, to step down from his job. The fact that the show was able to accomplish all this without losing any of its frothy appeal was a kind of minor miracle, a way of finding romantic tension in the boundaries of new rules.

It’s notable how many of these stories have seemed to reflect the institutions that produced them. This season of “The Good Fight,” Robert and Michelle King’s spinoff of “The Good Wife,” felt warped, like a fun-house-mirror portrait of the show’s parent network—CBS, in the wake of the resignation of Les Moonves, after allegations of sexual misconduct. In the winkingly titled episode “The One About the Recent Troubles,” the partners at the show’s law firm discover that the late Carl Reddick—a civil-rights hero and the firm’s founder—had sexually harassed and assaulted members of the office staff. Reddick’s daughter, Liz (the fantastic Audra McDonald), who is one of the partners, appears ready, bitterly, to confront his past acts. And yet, together, the partners conspire to cover them up, burying the stories in a fusillade of nondisclosure agreements. Later, they participate in a joke of an investigation that clears the firm of responsibility. Liz Reddick shreds the file containing evidence.

“The Good Fight” is a broadly satirical show, as surreal in its way as “Tuca and Bertie,” and not a gentle romance like “Younger” or “Jane the Virgin.” But, even in a darker series, one obsessed with corruption, the choice to show its central characters as near-villains feels significant. We’re forced to face their hypocrisy and the speed with which they choose financial security over justice. Even Diane Lockhart, the show’s feminist heroine, who has spent the show’s run obsessed with Donald Trump’s sexism, is key to the coverup. “Cynthia, we feel badly about what happened,” she tells Liz Reddick’s secretary, in a hushed voice, strategically placing her hand over the N.D.A. file. “We want to make it right.” She is a corporate lawyer, after all.

* * * *

Television isn’t the only medium to face this sort of reconsideration. Several recent Broadway productions—including revivals of “My Fair Lady” and “Kiss Me, Kate” and adaptations of “Pretty Woman” and “Tootsie”—have had “reimaginings.” In a sharp piece in the Times, Amanda Hess cautioned against the shortcut that too many productions have taken: “strengthening” female characters into bland badasses. (Meanwhile, on the musical-theatre TV show “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” on the CW, the heroine, Rebecca Bunch, found herself unable to sing the sexist mid-century classics she once adored—she rewrote them, instead, in her own voice.)

Also in the Times, Parul Sehgal praised a run of “#MeToo novels,” among them “Trust Exercise” and “Milkman,” for their ability to deal in “inconsistencies and incoherence, stories that thicken the mysteries of memory and volition.” Novels, Sehgal argued, are capable of what nonfiction is not, because fiction is free to “occupy the backwaters where the writer need not pander or persuade.” In part, she said, this is because novels are far freer to offend their audience—they are less hobbled by the anxious self-consciousness that she has sensed in so many modern #MeToo essays, whose writing, Sehgal wrote, feels too aware of the reader, “straining to appease, convince, console.”

TV shows, unlike novels, are never truly unaware of their audience: if they are, they don’t get renewed. Even in the streaming era, television is still a call-and-response medium, absorbing and reflecting viewer reactions. That’s both its strength and its limitation. It also makes it all the more impressive that so many shows have reached for exactly the quality that Sehgal describes—something that is beyond the rush of a righteous manifesto, exploring muddy currents rather than following more reassuring paths. There is a self-consciousness to a few of these shows, but it’s almost the opposite of the kind Sehgal writes about: it’s a desire to reject the “very special episode” path and seek something more honest and more original.

These are early stages. In the current wave of television, there are things that are missing, approaches that you can imagine coming: modes of sincere drama that go beyond subversive jokes. Stories about men seen through eyes other than those of a tormented antihero. Even fresh genres—horror or science fiction, say. The lens can keep widening.

* * * *

Of all the #MeToo stories this year, my favorite was the one that barely showed, peeking from the corners of “High Maintenance,” on HBO, the dreamy, allusive pot-dealer series set in Brooklyn. The series has, traditionally, been an anthology, with each episode telling its own story. But this year a small story ran through it, as the main character, known as the Guy, dated Lee, a woman who tells him, the night they meet, that she’s in the midst of a messy divorce. Slowly, it becomes clearer: she’s the wife of a famous actor fired for unspecified behavior, a man who has done something so gross that people get shifty-eyed when they mention it. She fends off awkward banter—an awful friend coos, greasily, “We’re always talking about the people who come forward, but we never talk about the ones who get left behind”—but her status is never fully explained. Maybe she’s collateral damage for his crimes, or maybe she’s at fault, for having supported him. It’s hard to tell, and the show never tries to spell out or simplify these questions.

The Guy stands by her, a comforting presence, as the two keep each other company, on and off, throughout the season. In a late episode, he runs into his ex-wife in the Rockaways, at a party where Lee feels exposed and judged. “I think it’s a little weird that she defended him,” his ex complains. “She left him,” he says—and then he adds, flippantly, “The heart wants what the heart wants.” It’s an insoluble problem, in which one person insists on forgiveness and the other on justice and neither is quite willing to budge.

It’s only at the end of the season that we see something else that’s been going on with the Guy, a story that’s been glimmering beneath the surfaces of the season. In a beautiful episode, the first in the series set in Manhattan, he visits two old high-school friends, a couple whose baby is in the hospital. He takes the husband on a bike trip, to distract him during this tragedy.

But he also has a conversation with the wife, Sarah. Outside the hospital, the two perch awkwardly, talking about old times. He looks down and says, “We were good friends.” Later, he asks, cautiously, “Whatever happened to that friendship?” What’s been haunting him, it turns out, is a story from high school: at a talent show, he’d pulled down Sarah’s pants in front of a crowd—she wasn’t wearing underwear. He clearly thought that the action marked him as someone who’d caused a trauma that hasn’t been forgiven.

Sarah laughs, flabbergasted. She doesn’t even remember the incident, she says. She’d pulled away for other reasons—because of politics, but mainly because he did drugs. “I’ve been sweating this for, like, twenty years,” the Guy says, flooded with relief. “Dude, you know, I might have done a lot of drugs, but you have a really ****ty memory.”

It’s a story that doesn’t have a clear moral but is beautifully expressive of a modern moment, revealing the flicker of history inside the core of one relationship. It’s a minor-key note inside a culture-wide chord.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...ing-with-metoo
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TV/Production Notes (Cable)
Starz Hands ‘The Spanish Princess’ Additional Eight-Episode Order To End Catherine of Aragon’s Story
By Peter White, Deadline.com - Jun. 3, 2019

Starz has handed The Spanish Princess a second run of eight episodes to conclude the story of Catherine of Aragon. The Lionsgate broadcaster is bringing the limited series to an end with eight additional episodes.

Charlotte Hope and Ruairi O’Connor return in their roles as Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII, while showrunners and exec producers Emma Frost and Matthew Graham will remain in their roles.

This comes as The Spanish Princess premiered on Sunday May 5. The series is produced by Playground and All3 Media’s New Pictures and is based on Philippa Gregory’s book The Constant Princess and The King’s Curse.

The Spanish Princess is the third in the trilogy, which began with The White Queen, which was a co-production with the BBC, and The White Princess, which starred Killing Eve’s Jodie Comer. Neither of the previous series were handed additional episodes.

Although there are currently no other projects in the works at Starz, Gregory has written other books that could be used as source material for further projects.

Returning to the world of Tudor royal court intrigue, The Spanish Princess is told from the point of view of the women, which also sheds light on a previously untold corner of history: the lives of people of color, living and working in 16th century London.

Catherine of Aragon (Charlotte Hope) is the strong-willed young Princess of Spain, who has been promised the English throne since she was a child. She arrives in a grey, rain-lashed England with her glorious and diverse court including her ladies-in-waiting Lina (Stephanie Levi-John) – a Spanish noble of African Iberian descent – and the sweet and free-spirited Rosa (Nadia Parkes). When her husband Prince Arthur dies suddenly, the throne seems lost to Catherine until she devises an audacious plan and sets her sights on the new heir, the charismatic and headstrong Prince Harry who will one day rule as King Henry VIII.

“We are thrilled to tell the next chapter of Catherine of Aragon’s story as she negotiates war, politics and marriage to the most dangerous King of England,” commented showrunners Emma Frost and Matthew Graham. Adding, “As a company that always produces compelling and dynamic projects, Starz has been a great creative partner and we look forward to concluding Catherine’s journey with them.”

“Emma and Matthew have created an alluring portrait of one of the most familiar narratives in English history,” added Starz COO Jeffrey Hirsch. “Viewers are intrigued by Catherine of Aragon’s story and this eight-episode conclusion will give us the opportunity to tell it in its entirety.”

https://deadline.com/2019/06/starz-t...ss-1202626020/
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post #30142 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 11:34 AM
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No political comments, please.

TV/Business Notes (Cable)

‘The Walking Dead’ Threatens To Leave Georgia After Ten Years Due To Abortion Law
By Paul Tassi, Forbes.com

But one way or another, this will take time, so the ramifications of this, both in terms of women’s health and the potential for Georgia to lose its entire entertainment industry, will not be clear for some time.
I'm sure the Georgia entertainment industry has already been hurt. I don't think anyone will be making new commitments to set up shop there for a very long time. Even if the law doesn't stand (this time) there's no reason to think they won't try again.
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Technology Notes (UltraHD Plus)
LG starts selling world’s first 8K OLED TV this week
By Sam Byford, TheVerge.com - Jun. 3, 2019



8K OLED TVs officially become a thing this week as LG starts taking orders in South Korea for arguably the most advanced consumer TV set ever created. The 88Z9 has an 88-inch OLED panel with 8K Ultra HD resolution (7680 x 4320) — that’s four times more pixels than 4K. The OLED panel itself is the largest that LG has ever shipped in a TV.

Barely any 8K content exists in the world right now, of course, and that’s not likely to change soon. LG is addressing this by leaning on its second-generation Alpha 9 8K processor that uses deep learning algorithms to help upscale images to a higher resolution. LG says the TV will also use deep learning to generate virtual 5.1 surround sound with support for Dolby Atmos.

We’ll have to see how well those technologies justify the unsurprisingly astronomical pricing. LG tells The Verge that the TV’s retail price is 50 million won (~$42,000), but preorders taken in June will have a reduced price of 40 million won (~$34,000) and come with a free air purifier. So that sounds like a bargain. The set will go on sale in North America and Europe in the third quarter of this year.

https://www.theverge.com/2019/6/3/18...le-price-korea
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)
From Zap2it.com's TV Grid - Jun. 3, 2019

ABC:
8PM - The Bachelorette (120 min.)
10PM - Celebrity Family Feud: The Kardashian Family vs. The West Family
(R)
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Zach Galifianakis; Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi; Alessia Cara performs)
(R)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - The Neighborhood
(R)
8:30PM - Man With A Plan
(R)
9PM - The Code
10PM - Bull
(R)
* * *
11:35PM - The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (Wanda Sykes; Vanessa Bayer)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show With James Corden (Musicians Nick, Joe and Kevin Jonas; mentalist Lior Suchard)
(R)

NBC:
8PM - 2019 Stanley Cup Final, Game 4: Boston Bruins at St. Louis Blues (LIVE)
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Harrison Ford; Richard Madden; Bazzi performs)
(R)
12:37AM - Late Night With Seth Meyers (Charlize Theron; Tim Robinson; Judah & the Lion performs; Valerie Franco sits in with the 8G Band)
(R)
1:38AM - Last Call With Carson Daly (Pam Grier; Ex Hex performs; Sarah Goldberg)
(R)

FOX:
8PM - Beat Shazam
9PM - So You Think You Can Dance (Season Premiere)

THE CW:
8PM - Masters of Illusion 21st Anniversary Special
(R)
9PM - Burden of Truth
(R)

PBS:
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Biloxi
(R)
9PM - Antiques Roadshow: San Diego
(R)
10PM - Independent Lens: TRAPPED (90 min.)
(R)

UNIVISION:
8PM - La Reina Soy Yo
9PM - Silvia Penal, Frente a Ti
10PM - Por Amar Sin Ley

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Un Poquito Tuyo
9PM - Betty in NY
10PM - La Reina del Sur

ESPN 2:
7PM - College Baseball, NCAA Tournament Corvallis Regional: Michigan vs. Creighton (LIVE)
10PM - College Baseball, NCAA Tournament Los Angeles Regional: Loyola Marymount vs. UCLA (LIVE)

ESPNU:
7PM - College Baseball - Oklahoma City Regional, Game 7: Connecticut vs. Oklahoma State (LIVE)
10PM - College Baseball, NCAA Tournament Stanford Regional: Fresno State vs. Stanford (LIVE)

ESPN:
7:30PM - 2019 Women's College World Series: UCLA vs. Oklahoma (LIVE)
10PM - MLB Baseball: Houston Astros at Seattle Mariners (LIVE)

A&E:
8PM - Live PD: Police Patrol
8:30PM - Live PD: Police Patrol
9PM - Live Rescue (120 min., LIVE)

FOOD NETWORK:
8PM - Best Baker in America
9PM - Best Baker in America
10PM - Wedding Cake Championship (Season Premiere)

TLC:
8PM - 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After?
9PM - 90 Day Fiance: The Other Way (Series Premiere, 124 min.)

USA:
8PM - WWE Monday Night RAW (3 hrs., LIVE)

VH1:
8PM - Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta
9:01PM - T.I. & Tiny: Friends and Family Hustle

BRAVO:
9PM - Below Deck Mediterranean (Season Premiere)
10PM - Summer House (Season Finale)
* * * *
11PM - Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen (TV personalities Jax Taylor and Brittany Cartwright)
(R)

HBO:
9PM - Chernobyl (Episode 5, 75 min.)
10:05PM - Gentleman Jack (Episode 7)

HGTV:
9PM - Hidden Potential (Season Premiere)
9:30PM - Hidden Potential
10PM - House Hunters
10:30PM - House Hunters International
* * * *
11PM - Say Yes to the Nest

ID:
9PM - People Magazine Investigates: Cults (Season Premiere)
10PM - Breaking Homicide (Season Premiere)

MTV:
9PM - Teen Mom 2
10:01PM - Teen Mom 2

TVONE:
11PM - The DL Hughley Show (Robert Ri'chard)

PARAMOUNT:
10PM - Cops (Season Premiere)
10:30PM - Cops
(R)

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show With Trevor Noah (Guest TBA, 36 min.)

E!
10PM - Nightly Pop

SHOWTIME:
11PM - Desus & Mero (Spike Lee and Matt Walsh)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Thomas Middleditch)


https://tvlistings.zap2it.com/?aid=gapzap
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post #30145 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 03:30 PM
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I'm sure the Georgia entertainment industry has already been hurt. I don't think anyone will be making new commitments to set up shop there for a very long time.
Even if the law doesn't stand (this time) there's no reason to think they won't try again.
Confucius say “Fall down 8 times, get up 9.”

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post #30146 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 04:22 PM
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Confucius say “Fall down 8 times, get up 9.”
On a fortune cookie. But what did Sun Tzu say?
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post #30147 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 04:30 PM
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NY Post, AP, TVWeek
Sony Furious About Leaked Video of Tonight’s ‘Jeopardy!’ (Spoiler Alert)
Jun 3, 2019

A leaked video clip from the TV game show “Jeopardy!” that began circulating over the weekend has the show’s producer, Sony Pictures Television, up in arms.

For viewers who follow “Jeopardy!,” the story below reveals details about what happens on the show, so we’re issuing a spoiler alert and recommend that you stop reading now unless you are OK finding out what happens.

The New York Post reports that the viral clip, which began making the rounds Sunday on social media, prompted copyright strikes from Sony. But the clip continues to appear on Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and other sites.

The clip involves James Holzhauer, who has been on a historic run as a “Jeopardy!” champion.

“The game show’s 32-time champion lost for the first time in an episode that airs Monday, falling short of records for total winnings and longest reign but leaving little doubt he’s the best to ever play television’s most popular game,” the AP reports. “In a video of the moment that circulated online, the professional sports gambler from Las Vegas is shown high-fiving the woman who beat him, Chicago librarian Emma Boettcher.”

Holzhauer’s run on the show has helped pump up the popular syndicated show’s ratings.

The AP quotes an email interview with Holzhauer in which he acknowledges the end of his run. “I really felt like I had been playing with house money, so I wasn’t too upset to see my run end,” Holzhauer says in the email, adding that he ran into “a terrific opponent playing flawlessly.”

The New York Post adds: “The apparent stumble cuts down Holzhauer after a mind-boggling 32 consecutive wins, good for a total haul of $2,464,216, including the $2,000 he would receive for finishing second on Monday’s episode.

“He comes up short, however, of besting legend Ken Jennings, who notched 74 wins good for $2,520,700 in 2004 — and marveled at Holzhauer’s run as ‘astounding.’”

https://www.tvweek.com/tvbizwire/201...spoiler-alert/

***

Just so you know, I was not the one that posted the video. Another BUDhead must have. Either that, or someone at a station pulled the video off the PitchBlue server and posted it.

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post #30148 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 05:15 PM
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James' final wager was so out of character and a total surprise. He would still have lost by a $1 had he gone all in, but he didn't know how much she was going to bid. A part of me thinks he wanted Ken's money total to stand.
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post #30149 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 05:30 PM
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The NYTimes posted the story this morning, with a spoiler warning. They said some station already aired the episode, which broke the embargo.
Las Vegas Sun also posted it.
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post #30150 of 30890 Old 06-03-2019, 05:56 PM
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And it hasn’t yet aired on the west coast. There should be a Jeopardy thread then we wouldn’t have specific spoilers in this thread.
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