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post #13861 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Without public TV, do you really think classical music would ever show up on TV? There used to be arts channels on cable TV, but they were not as popular as the K Family, so the arts mostly disappeared.

Public TV is also one of the few sources of old-time (folk-based) country music and bluegrass on TV.
And yet again you are assuming PBS would go away without the tax payer funds and it most assuredly would not. It would still remain a non-profit and operate just as it does today, only without the taxpayer funds, a small portion of their budget. And again, I'm not advocating that the support be discontinued, just that it be looked at objectively as any other expenditure. I'm sure I can find a lot more items in the budget I'd cut before I'd cut PBS funding, but PBS funding would be on my list of items to review. And it would be one of those items that would get a sundown date so it would have to be reviewed every so many years or funding automatically cut. The wealthy in this country have more than enough excess money to fund PBS, the Arts, etc., and plenty of incentive via tax write-offs to do so.
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post #13862 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 04:23 PM
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Without public TV, do you really think classical music would ever show up on TV?
It doesn't need to. Unlike the late 1900s, there are many more ways to access the arts, now. I can easily pull up a multitude of concerts on YouTube. On demand and in HD. Same for classical radio. It's all but disappeared because there are alternate options available. Some say it's a way to get the arts to the poor. Trust me. They don't watch anything outside of "Sesame Street." Studies show the average PBS viewer is pretty affluent. Even if not, it's those affluent ones who are calling the shots as to what PBS shows.

It'll do fine without any government funding.

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post #13863 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 04:46 PM
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PBS does not subscribe to the same level of Nielsen ratings services as the Big Four do, so it is difficult to know how many people are watching or what they are watching.

Shows like Downton Abbey and Great Performances do seem to cater to the upper crusty crowd, but the public TV stations also have some of the best cooking shows, home improvements shows, and arts and crafts shows on TV. Far superior to what is available from the "cable channels" in moderately priced cable packages.

Daytime TV on public TV stations in particular is far better than on the commercial stations.

No Judge Judy. No "Who is the baby's daddy?" shows.

No huckster televangelists.

Public TV still understands "family values".

And many local public TV stations do a lot to promote tourism within the state, which helps the state's economy.
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post #13864 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 05:25 PM
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Daytime TV on public TV stations in particular is far better than on the commercial stations........And many local public TV stations do a lot to promote tourism within the state, which helps the state's economy.
Here's the daytime lineup here (6:00-4:30); Wai Lana Yoga, Arthur, Wild Kratts, Ready Jet Go!, Nature Cat, Curious George, Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood, Splash and Bubbles, Sesame Street, Dinosaur Train, Peg+Cat, Super WHY!, Thomas & Friends, Sesame Street (again), Splash and Bubbles (again), The Cat In The Hat Knows a Lot About That, Arthur (again), Wild Kratts (again), Odd Squad, and WordGirl.

Now, that might be quality TV for the pre-school crowd, but it hardly qualifies as quality TV. That doesn't mean that Judge Judy, etc., are though, drivel is drivel, but at least Judge Judy brings in viewers, advertising dollars and doesn't need taxpayer support. Evening is where quality programming is, along with some weekend stuff during the day, but for the umpteenth time, no one is suggesting PBS go away, so I'm not sure what your point is.

EDIT: I'm done with this discussion.

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post #13865 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 05:40 PM
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Here's the daytime lineup here (6:00-4:30); Wai Lana Yoga, Arthur, Wild Kratts, Ready Jet Go!, Nature Cat,
Those are decisions made by your local station. My local public TV station has a more diverse daytime lineup. It runs PBS children's shows until mid afternoon and then switches over to shows about cooking, sewing, and crafts. It's kind of geared to homemakers. (Helps the wives put a meal on the table when the man of the house arrives home from a long, tough day of bread winning. )Sometimes it shows Britcoms in the late afternoon. And there is some locally produced programming, too. The commercial stations don't do much local production, aside from news.
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post #13866 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 05:46 PM
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Indeed, consider the location and the target demographic. KQED here in the SF bay area has a wealth of interesting programming, they have so much of it there are 2 or 3 subchannels being used as well.
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post #13867 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 07:48 PM
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I think the analogy is appropriate. Many people have no choice other than to subscribe to some level of cable or satellite TV service because OTA reception is not available, reliable, or practical at their location....
Darn it, you made me end my self-imposed moratorium on social media.

I am tired of hearing that OTA is not available anymore. It has been available since the 1940s. Nothing has changed except people no longer put up antennas to receive the signals. And, yes, I am tired of hearing that no one has line of sight for their antennas anymore due to digital signals. Bull hockey.

Unless TV stations have quit broadcasting OTA, then people should still be able to receive them as they did 60-70 years ago. Whether it is an analog or digital signal should make no difference in people being able to receive the signals. Just put up the proper antenna. I have never in my 60 plus years been without a signal via an antenna, whether it be rabbit ears or an outdoor roof-mounted antenna, and most of the time it has been by rabbit ear antennas (and for the last fifteen or more years it has been rabbit ears).

Cable and satellite are luxury conveniences that you have been led to believe are necessities.

Let the flaming begin.
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post #13868 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 07:52 PM
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PBS does not subscribe to the same level of Nielsen ratings services as the Big Four do, so it is difficult to know how many people are watching or what they are watching.
They don't subscribe, but the data is still available. I used to get the weeklies when I had a TV show. PBS was always in the mix.

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post #13869 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 07:56 PM
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Darn it, you made me end my self-imposed moratorium on social media.

I am tired of hearing that OTA is not available anymore. It has been available since the 1940s. Nothing has changed except people no longer put up antennas to receive the signals. And, yes, I am tired of hearing that no one has line of sight for their antennas anymore due to digital signals. Bull hockey.

Unless TV stations have quit broadcasting OTA, then people should still be able to receive them as they did 60-70 years ago. Whether it is an analog or digital signal should make no difference in people being able to receive the signals. Just put up the proper antenna. I have never in my 60 plus years been without a signal via an antenna, whether it be rabbit ears or an outdoor roof-mounted antenna, and most of the time it has been by rabbit ear antennas (and for the last fifteen or more years it has been rabbit ears).

Cable and satellite are luxury conveniences that you have been led to believe are necessities.

Let the flaming begin.

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post #13870 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 08:00 PM
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Darn it, you made me end my self-imposed moratorium on social media.

I am tired of hearing that OTA is not available anymore. It has been available since the 1940s. Nothing has changed except people no longer put up antennas to receive the signals.

... Just put up the proper antenna. ...

Cable and satellite are luxury conveniences that you have been led to believe are necessities.
I am fully aware that OTA reception is possible. In fact, after the transition to digital broadcasting, I downgraded the cable TV subscription and began using an indoor antenna for reception. An indoor antenna would not have sufficed in the days of analog broadcasting (for my particular situation).

But let's be realistic. Many people live in apartment buildings that are set up for cable TV and no longer have a "communal antenna" the way an apartment building might have had in the 1960's.

Also, there are not that many professional antenna installers around anymore. And, unfortunately, in many places HOA's try to dissuade homeowners from putting up outdoor antennas.

Plus, reception via antenna has always depended a lot on the surrounding terrain. In some difficult areas, cable TV and satellite are the only feasible options.

Finally, the dominance of cable (as internet service provider as well as TV programming deliverer) and the ability of stations to get revenue from re-transmission consent payments has tended to cause stations to perhaps not care as much about OTA reception as they used to.

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post #13871 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 08:33 PM
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Plus, reception via antenna has always depended a lot on the surrounding terrain. In some difficult areas, cable TV and satellite are the only feasible options.
That's the situation where I live. There is no line-of-sight to any TV transmission tower.

Similarly, in the city where my sister lives, although she used to be able to watch OTA analog TV stations, their OTA digital signals are too badly damaged by multipath reflections to be watchable.

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post #13872 of 30529 Old 01-21-2017, 11:31 PM
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Really hoping Superior Donuts and Imaginary Mary pan out to be as funny as I'm hoping. The promos were anyway...
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post #13873 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 06:27 AM
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That's the situation where I live. There is no line-of-sight to any TV transmission tower.



Similarly, in the city where my sister lives, although she used to be able to watch OTA analog TV stations, their OTA digital signals are too badly damaged by multipath reflections to be watchable.


Living in downtown D.C. multipath reflections are horrible all of our short wide buildings create havoc to the digital signals before the digital transition even the Baltimore stations were accessible. Now I'm surrounded by new construction and cranes so OTA is a big no.

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post #13874 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 07:03 AM
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Technology/Business Notes
Apple sues Qualcomm for withholding $1 billion ‘as retaliation’
By Jacob Kastrenakes, TheVerge.com - Jan. 20, 2017

Apple is suing Qualcomm for $1 billion, saying that the mobile chip maker has been dramatically overcharging it for the use of basic patents, according to CNBC.
LOL, this is the pot calling the kettle black. I mean who's the king of overcharging here, really?
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post #13875 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 07:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Nielsen Notes
Trump inauguration drew 30.6 million viewers
By Jayme Deerwester, USA Today - Jan. 21, 2017

Donald Trump's interest in his ratings and crowd sizes is well-documented. And his latest numbers are in.

Nielsen reports 30.6 million viewers watched his inauguration Friday. Their analysis measured the number of viewers who watched live coverage on 12 networks from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET.

To put that number in perspective, 37.8 million tuned in to watch Barack Obama take the oath of office as the first African-American president in 2009. That ceremony was the second-most watched inauguration in the last 47 years.

Trump's swearing-in, which ranked fifth out of the 13 ceremonies in Nielsen's report, was roughly on par with the first inaugurations of Bill Clinton in 1993 (29.7 million viewers) and George W. Bush (29 million) in 2001.

Ronald Reagan topped the leader board with 41.8 million watching his first inauguration in 1981.

The third most-watched ceremony was that of Jimmy Carter in 1977, which drew 34.1 million.

Richard Nixon was the only re-elected president to get higher ratings the second time around. His 1973 ceremony drew 33 million, good enough for fourth.

See more of Nielsen's study here.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/t...wers/96901754/
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post #13876 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 07:39 AM
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That said, the NEED for PBS isn't what it was when it was created. There are so many other distribution avenues for the types of programming they do and the targeted audiences of that programming.
Without commercials?

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post #13877 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 07:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Nielsen Overnights (Broadcast)
‘Last Man Standing’ Tops Friday To Extend Streak, ‘Emerald City’ Ratings Slip Further
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Jan. 21, 2017

ABC’s Last Man Standing extended its strong 2017 ratings showing with another solid delivering last night. The multi-camera sitcom starring Tim Allen was the top program on Friday in adults 18-49 (Live+same day) for a fourth consecutive week with a 1.3 rating, even with last week and the second highest result for the show this season behind its January return (1.5).

Last Man Standing has been a success story in broadcast syndication where it launched last fall. The extra exposure may have boosted the ABC airings on the sitcom, whose ratings upswing started with the fall finale in December. Also, the show may have successfully tapped in the mood of the country post-election — with a central character who is a political conservative and devout Christian adhering to traditional American values, the show appeals to viewers in the Heartland.

Following LMS, Dr. Ken (1.0) ticked up a tenth from last week. Even with Shark Tank a repeat, ABC won the night in 18-49

CBS’ Friday lineup needs MacGyver at 8 PM. With the freshman drama preempted for an inauguration special at 8 PM (0.7, 4.9 million), Hawaii Five-0 (1.2, 8.4 mil) matched a series low in 18-49 (L+SD) and hit a season low in total viewers. Also impacted was Blue Bloods 1.2, (9.8 mil) at 10 PM, off by a tenth in the demo but still Friday’s most watched program.

NBC’s Grimm (0.8) held steady with last week but freshman Emerald City (0.7) continues to fade, slipping another tenth to a new low. The Wizard of Oz drama is likely to end up as a limited event, with no second installment.

Fox’s Rosewood (0.6) slipped down a tenth. Ditto for Sleepy Hollow (0.5), which hit a new L+SD series low.

The CW’s Vampire Diaries (0.3), in its final season, was off by a tenth to tie a series low, while Crazy Ex Girlfriend (0.2), already renewed for next season, was steady.

http://deadline.com/2017/01/last-man...-0-1201891438/
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post #13878 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 07:43 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Notes (Cable)
How FX’s Baskets Will Be Different in Season Two
By David Marchese, Vulture.com (New York Magazine)

Every family experiences its own surreal and slightly upsetting moments when the façade cracks and unsettling truths that are usually buried come up to the surface. Little things can do it. Maybe it’s a condescending quip by the sibling with a good job at the expense of the sibling stuck in a bad one while you’re waiting to buy tickets for the Chipmunks Squeakquel. Or, maybe, as in the case of the titular family on the upcoming second season of FX's absurd and beautiful family comedy, Baskets, it's an insensitive aside from a son about his mom's weight when ordering dessert at Applebee's. Jonathan Krisel, the showrunner and co-creator of Baskets, which begins its second season on January 19, has a catchall for those moments. "The writers and I call that stuff 'crying in the Best Buy,'" says Krisel. "Our goal with Baskets is to get at exactly those moments. There's something so compelling about unloading emotional baggage in these American places that are so clean and bright and happy." The other reason? "Those moments are pretty funny."

It's the deftness with which Baskets handles these simultaneously cringeworthy, comic, and bittersweet disconnects — which almost always arise from a caring place — that make it one of TV's most emotionally authentic shows about the way families get along, or try to anyway. "Even happy families have things about them that are sad," says stand-up comedian Martha Kelly, who plays Chip's friend, also named Martha. "The Baskets family is always trying to stay physically close to each other, but they end up not really connecting with each other. My family's like that sometimes, too." (Kelly, who hadn't acted before season one, jokes that her character was given her own name "to make my job easier. Going into the second season, I definitely feel less like I'm about to be fired.")

Lest this sound like the show has turned wholly toward sober domestic drama, let’s be clear: This is still a series that follows the misadventures of a wannabe clown artiste (star Zach Galifianakis's Chip) forced to return home to Bakersfield, California, and look for non-soul-destroying clown work; his financially successful and overbearing twin brother, Dale (also played by Galifianakis), who speaks with an unexplained Southern accent; their widowed mother, Christine, played by comedian Louie Anderson in drag (he won an Emmy for his performance); and Chip's friend and emotional doormat Martha, who has a cast on her arm that, like Dale's drawl, remains unexplained. So we're not talking about a straightforward piece of realism. By design, the humor leavens the heartache, and the heartache grounds the humor — the tone remains the same whether we’re watching Chip struggle to open a can of food or Dale try to reconcile with his estranged wife.

But for the upcoming second season, the show's creative team, which, in addition to Krisel and Galifianakis, includes executive producer Louis C.K., have also tried to lighten things emotionally. "The trajectory for this season," says Krisel, "particularly for Chip, was that maybe people get tired of making their lives harder than they need to be. Maybe there's happiness to be found in clowning at a children's birthday. Especially when you're younger, you tend to think that art and comedy can only come from tragedy, but happiness can be just as interesting and complicated."

The second season’s emphasis on happiness is most apparent in Christine’s story line. It’s something Anderson pushed for. “At the end of last season,” he says, “she was spending all her time and energy trying to be supportive of Chip’s dreams, and I think it was important that she start to make some decisions about her own dreams. So I asked Jonathan, ‘Could you make Christine twirl this year? Can she have a little more fun?’ And that’s what the writers did.”

To accomplish that, Krisel drew from some unlikely sources. “Louie was totally right that there was more of a spectrum to exploit with the character of Christine,” he says. “To figure out how to do that, I looked a lot at season four of Breaking Bad, when Walter White become the villain of the show, and they shifted who the protagonist and antagonist were. It was such a cool idea to switch the A plot and B plots around.” Another key influence was Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation. “That movie has such a beautiful, pensive approach to a young woman’s feeling adrift, and I thought it would be cool if we transposed that kind of filmmaking onto a woman like Christine. She’s someone who wants to be excited for what her kids are doing, but she’s also really excited by finding the best bargains at Costco. We tried to find the poetry in that.”

The new season also gracefully addresses the issue of Christine’s weight, and the subtle — and funny — tension that arises when she tries to change the unhealthy lifestyle to which her family is accustomed. “There’s a scene with Chip and Christine at an Applebee’s this season that encapsulates a lot of what the show is trying to do,” says Krisel. “They’re just ordering dessert, but because of Christine’s health, dessert has taken on this huge meaning, and Chip just doesn’t get it. The waitress doesn’t know what’s going between them and is seeing these two people having this bizarre argument. So much of the humor in the second season is about deep-seated emotional baggage spilling out into the open like that.”

For Anderson, the focus on Christine’s health was necessary for his ability to play the part. “I struggle with weight,” he says, “and I don’t think we could ignore the fact that Christine is almost 400 pounds. So I really encouraged that direction. We did it in a way that’s serious, but it’s Christine saying, ‘I’ll just have a tiny corner of the tiny piece of the cake,’ and wrestling with it that way. As a stand-up comic, my instinct is to make a big joke out of things, but Jonathan and the writers are so clever about making sure the jokes have a slant that makes the character richer and not just a simple punch line.”

If Baskets has simple punch lines, they usually come at the expense of the beleaguered Martha, who is dealing with the fallout from an ill-conceived bout of van sex with Dale and, two seasons in, still can’t seem to do anything that doesn’t invoke a passive-aggressive response from Chip. “For a moment,” says Krisel, “we had this idea of let’s really get into what makes Martha tick. There is an episode in the new season that goes more into her world, but we thought going too deep would rob her of what makes her funny. It’d be like explaining a joke.”

Kelly admits that she’s been surprised when fans of the show tell her they want her character to be treated better. “How Martha and Chip are on the show is so close to how Zach and I are off the show,” she says. “I call him an idiot all the time. It didn’t even register to me that he could be perceived as being mean.” She’s also slightly perplexed by the curiosity around where her arm cast comes from. “I usually even forget I’m even wearing it,” she says. “It’s actually sort of cozy.”

At the risk of treating a prop with a degree of conceptual clunkiness that Baskets would avoid, Martha’s cast seems like an apt metaphor for how this strangely endearing show works. Sometimes it’s the clunky, awkward things that wind up providing the most comfort. Or not. “The cast is just funnier if it’s a weird thing on the show,” says Kelly, “and we never explain why it’s there.”

http://www.vulture.com/2017/01/fx-ba...o-preview.html
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post #13879 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 07:51 AM
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Without commercials?
Yep. You can see full classical concerts on YouTube, anytime. Or pick up a CD/DVD at the library. And PBS has commercials. LOTS of 'em cleverly disguised as "This program made possible by a grant provided by..." I've seen as many as 12 minutes of that in an hour on local PBS stations. That's how those local affiliates can afford all the new equipment and big bonuses for their sales departments. For that matter.. they have sales departments. Pretty much says it, right there.

At least when you pick up a DVD of The Boston Pops, it's not interrupted every 15 minutes by a pledge drive.
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post #13880 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 07:58 AM - Thread Starter
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TV/Critic's Notes (Cable)
‘Mercy Street’ returns; ‘New Edition Story,’ ‘Beaches’ premiere
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette's 'Tuned In' Column - Jan. 20, 2017

PASADENA, Calif. — The next few days in prime time mark the return of a popular historical drama, the debut of a music group biopic and the remake of a 1980s movie classic.

‘Mercy Street’

PBS’s Civil War-era hospital drama “Mercy Street” (8 p.m. Sunday, WQED-TV) returns for its second season, picking up right where it left off. But after clearing up some cliffhangers, the plot swiftly moves forward.

One character from season one doesn’t return (bye-bye, Auralia) but several newcomers enter the Alexandria, Va., scene, including an odd duck new head of the hospital (Bryce Pinkham) and a former slave turned activist (2006 Carnegie Mellon University grad Patina Miller, “Madame Secretary”).

“Mercy Street” remains strictly middlebrow fare, but it’s well-done for what it is and better than in its first season.

Producers pair up the characters differently in upcoming episodes, which allows for fresh interactions and the opportunity for character back stories to emerge from the unexpected pairings.

‘Beaches’

Move over, Bette Midler and Barbara Hershey: Idina Menzel and Nia Long take over their roles in Lifetime’s “Beaches” remake (8 p.m. Saturday; check local listing for scheduled repeats) with Ms. Menzel belting out new versions of “Wind Beneath My Wings” and “Glory of Love.”

Producers didn’t change much for the reboot.

“There is one other thread with Nia’s storyline that makes it different from the original, which is that she is a woman that has a career and finds her true joy and passion in being a mother, and that debate of career versus motherhood is something that will touch a lot of women,” said executive producer Alison Greenspan. “It’s a new angle on that journey from the original.”

Ms. Menzel called the new “Beaches” an homage.

“If it can open a new discussion at this time about where women are, and how we balance and navigate all of these passions we have and ourselves career and our family,” she said. “I think it’s similar to back then, but I think things have changed. So it’s just another way to start a conversation.”

‘New Edition Story’

For a musical experience in the R&B genre, BET offers “The New Edition Story,” a six-hour miniseries airing at 9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday next week.

Executive producer Jesse Collins said the group’s longevity was part of the appeal of telling their story in dramatic form.

“We’re talking about a group that started as a boy band and then evolved from there into adult superstars,” he said. “Not even just as a group, but as individuals. New Edition gave us Bobby Brown, BBD, Johnny Gill, Ralph Tresvant, all solo stars on their own right. But then, collectively, you know, New Edition, “Heartbreak” album, “Home Again” album, mega success. And there is not another group in music history that’s ever done that.”

All the group’s members were producers on the film and members were often at rehearsal, according to actor Elijah Kelley, who plays Ricky Bell.

“Some days, everybody would be there,” Mr. Kelley said. “The most invigorating part was them getting up in their older age and doing all the choreography in front of us.”

“Better than us,” added Algee Smith, who plays Ralph Tresvant.

Channel surfing

Jerry Seinfeld’s “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” will migrate from Crackle to Netflix late this year and Mr. Seinfeld also will film two new stand-up specials for Netflix. ... The Monica Lewinsky-Bill Clinton scandal may be the basis for a future season of producer Ryan Murphy’s “American Crime Story,” which previously tackled the O.J. Simpson trial.

http://www.post-gazette.com/ae/tv-ra...s/201701200069
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post #13881 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 08:00 AM
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Yep. You can see full classical concerts on YouTube, anytime. Or pick up a CD/DVD at the library. And PBS has commercials. LOTS of 'em cleverly disguised as "This program made possible by a grant provided by..." I've seen as many as 12 minutes of that in an hour on local PBS stations. That's how those local affiliates can afford all the new equipment and big bonuses for their sales departments. For that matter.. they have sales departments. Pretty much says it, right there.
I thought you meant other outlets for viewing via your TV from OTA or cable/DTV. You aren't going to get the shows that are on Masterpiece Theater via YouTube or your library, in a timely manner. Sure, all of the shows on Masterpiece end up on Blu-ray, eventually.

Also, I should have said: without commercial interruptions? I couldn't care less about the 5 minutes of stuff at the end of a show. And yes, there is that 30 sec to a minute interruption near the start of many shows, but the rest of NOVA is commercial free. No more breaks every 30 seconds (it seems that way). Last thing I want to see is NOVA on a commercial outlet where the 53 min program is reduced to 42 min (if we are that lucky).
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post #13882 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 08:39 AM
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My point wasn't that specific programs on PBS were available elsewhere. It's that the arts and cultural programming as a whole is available through numerous avenues that weren't available when PBS was created. It's just not important to consider PBS as America's only source for cultural programming. The justification for subsidizing it at the Federal level just isn't there, anymore.

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post #13883 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 08:46 AM
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And yes, there is that 30 sec to a minute interruption near the start of many shows,.
Minute? On the PBS affiliate I viewed, last week, "Victoria" started about 5 minutes after the hour. The previous show ended before the hour, too. My recording is set to start 3 minutes before. So, that meant a stopset over 8 minutes long. That's a lot of ads. Which, like you, I'm fine with. But let PBS run full ads. I think, even if allowed to run full commercials, they're smarter than to break up the shows like commercial television does. They're close enough now. And they make so much off of those tax-deductible ads they don't need federal funding.
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post #13884 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 09:22 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Review (Cable)
'Beware the Slenderman' is a chilling look at a crime inspired by the Internet
By Meredith Blake, Los Angeles Times - Jan. 21, 2017

In simpler times, anxious parents worried about what might happen to their children at the park or on the walk home from school. These days, parents fret about the dangers that might lurk behind a closed door in their own home.

“Beware the Slenderman,” airing Monday on HBO, will do little to quell fears over screen time, social media and the influence of technology on young people. The story it tells is — at the risk of sounding like a local news promo — every parent’s worst nightmare.

The documentary, directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, examines the disturbing case of Morgan Geyser and Anissa Weier, two 12-year-old Wisconsin girls who in 2014 lured another friend into the woods and stabbed her 19 times (she survived). The motive for their crime? Pleasing Slender Man, or Slenderman, a fictional boogeyman popularized through Internet forums, blogs and social media that the girls believed was real.

“Beware the Slenderman” joins a growing list of documentaries that fall under the true-crime banner, but offer something more than lurid sensationalism — “The Jinx,” Making a Murderer,” “O.J. Made in America.” In this case, it’s a deeply unsettling look at childhood mental illness, the blurred line between the virtual and real, and the potency of internet memes.

“Beware the Slenderman” uses some of the usual source materials — interviews with family members, home movies, police interrogation footage, local news reports — to establish the basic details of the crime itself. Though Geyser was allegedly the one who stabbed the victim — Payton “Bella” Leutner, her best friend since fourth grade — it was Weier who egged her on. “Go ballistic, go crazy,” she reportedly said.

As with other young, violent duos — Leopold and Loeb, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris — Peyser and Weier complement each other in terrible ways. Weier is socially isolated and bullied, spending seemingly most of her free time online. In one of the documentary’s more affecting sequences, Brodsky recreates one of Weier’s browsing sessions, clicking through ephemera like an “Are you a psychopath?” quiz and a YouTube clip of a woman feeding a mouse to wild cats.

Peyser initially seems the more dominant and calculating of the two, but, we gradually learn, she’s a bright young woman with a strong affinity for fictional worlds. We see snapshots of her dressed as a Vulcan and hear about how she believed in Santa Claus until she was 11.

Both girls have mental health issues that slowly come to light but were not necessarily obvious to their family members, and find refuge in their shared interests. Like millions of other tweens, they love scary stories, and spend hours reading and sharing horror tales on the popular website Creepypasta. They both become particularly fixated with Slender Man, an unusually tall and thin, faceless man who, according to lore, abducts children. In order to save their families from his wrath, they commit to to becoming one of his “proxies.”

Weier’s and Geyser’s parents, who appear at length in the film, are not the neglectful people it’s easy (or maybe just comforting) to assume they are. Weier’s father worries about the influence of technology on his daughter, and is seen trying, unsuccessfully, to pry his son away from the iPad. Peyser’s mother recalls worrying that her daughter never got upset watching films like “Bambi”: “If something bad happened to the main character, she wouldn’t have empathy for them.”

What really sets “Beware the Slenderman” apart is its attempt to place this gruesome crime in a broader cultural context. Brodsky spends a considerable amount of the film’s running time interviewing — via Skype, which seems apt — experts in memes, digital folklore and the Brothers Grimm. They argue that, similar to the Pied Piper or other menacing fictional characters, the Slender Man myth reflects the particular anxieties of its time.

Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins even weighs in, describing a meme, even something innocuous like the Ice Bucket Challenge, as “a virus of the mind spread by being listened to or seen.”

Fittingly, Brodsky incorporates (surprisingly non-cheesy) dramatizations of Slender Man into the usual documentary blend of interviews, police interrogations, home movies and local news reports.

The final third or so of “Beware the Slenderman” also raises critical questions about childhood mental illness and the justice system, where high-profile crimes such as this one are often handled with an eye towards retribution rather than rehabilitation. Sadly, despite the very strange and particular circumstances of this case, it’s just like many others.

‘Beware the Slenderman’
Where: HBO
When: 10 p.m. Monday


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...123-story.html
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post #13885 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 10:21 AM
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Minute? On the PBS affiliate I viewed, last week, "Victoria" started about 5 minutes after the hour............they don't need federal funding.
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02:00-24:00 Program
24:00-30:00 Commercials/Previews
30:00-52:00 Program
52:00-60:00 Commercials/Previews

So, 22+22=44 minutes of programming. It is nice that they don't interrupt, but the actual program time seems pretty much the same as commercial TV to me. And if you have a DVR, interruptions aren't a big deal
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post #13886 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 11:33 AM - Thread Starter
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TV/Critic's Notes (Advertising)
What If Matthew McConaughey’s Lincoln Commercials Are About Some Guy Who Is Losing His Mind?
By Brian Grubb, Uproxx.com

Matthew McConaughey has been making commercials for Lincoln for over three years now. This means a few things. One, it means advertising is weird, because who would’ve ever imagined this becoming one of our longest running, most successful ad campaigns, especially before the whole True Detective “Time is a flat circle” thing set the world on fire. There was a time, not long ago, when Matthew McConaughey was thought of as a shirtless, bongo-playing hippie who hung out at the beach, and Lincoln was thought of as a car driven by rich old uncles who play golf three days a week. We’ve all come a long way.

And two, it means we’ve now seen enough of these commercials to start noticing a pattern or two. The most obvious pattern is “Wow, Matthew McConaughey is an odd dude,” which is extremely true. But I was watching these all again and something started rattling around in my brain. What if this isn’t “Matthew McConaughey” in these commercials? What if he’s actually just playing a character in them, the same character all the way through, and that character is slowly losing his mind? What if this is all heading somewhere?

Now, this is undeniably a stupid idea. Quite stupid, in fact. I’ll gladly cop to that. But if you’re willing to give it a chance and take a stroll with me through the history of the campaign, I think we can have some fun with it all anyway. Buckle in. Things are gonna get strange.

[CLICK LINK BELOW TO SEE COMMERCIALS AND ANALYSIS OF EACH ONE]

http://uproxx.com/tv/matthew-mcconau...n-commercials/
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post #13887 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 11:41 AM
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What If Matthew McConaughey’s Lincoln Commercials Are About Some Guy Who Is Losing His Mind?
What if he’s actually just playing a character in them, the same character all the way through, and that character is slowly losing his mind? What if this is all heading somewhere?
Aren't most people in commercials playing a character? I mean, I'm pretty sure Peyton Manning doesn't hang out at the park in his robe on Sundays and I doubt Stephanie Courtney runs around in the middle of the night fixing mailboxes, either.
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post #13888 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 11:51 AM
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This Old House Hour recording
00:00-02:00 Commercials/Previews
02:00-24:00 Program
24:00-30:00 Commercials/Previews
30:00-52:00 Program
52:00-60:00 Commercials/Previews

So, 22+22=44 minutes of programming. It is nice that they don't interrupt, but the actual program time seems pretty much the same as commercial TV to me. And if you have a DVR, interruptions aren't a big deal
That's probably not the best example, as it is actually two programs back to back and is not typical of the rest of the schedule.
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post #13889 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 11:54 AM
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Nielsen Notes
Trump inauguration drew 30.6 million viewers
By Jayme Deerwester, USA Today - Jan. 21, 2017

Donald Trump's interest in his ratings and crowd sizes is well-documented. And his latest numbers are in.

Nielsen reports 30.6 million viewers watched his inauguration Friday. Their analysis measured the number of viewers who watched live coverage on 12 networks from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET.

To put that number in perspective, 37.8 million tuned in to watch Barack Obama take the oath of office as the first African-American president in 2009. That ceremony was the second-most watched inauguration in the last 47 years.

Trump's swearing-in, which ranked fifth out of the 13 ceremonies in Nielsen's report, was roughly on par with the first inaugurations of Bill Clinton in 1993 (29.7 million viewers) and George W. Bush (29 million) in 2001.

Ronald Reagan topped the leader board with 41.8 million watching his first inauguration in 1981.

The third most-watched ceremony was that of Jimmy Carter in 1977, which drew 34.1 million.

Richard Nixon was the only re-elected president to get higher ratings the second time around. His 1973 ceremony drew 33 million, good enough for fourth.

See more of Nielsen's study here.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/t...wers/96901754/
Any reports for the number of webwatcher?
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post #13890 of 30529 Old 01-22-2017, 12:18 PM
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Any reports for the number of webwatcher?
Haven't seen and I've been looking. CNN reported 2.6 million simultaneous streams at 11am, but nothing on total unique viewers. Also, PBS figures weren't included in that total. And, we're still waiting on Live+3 stats if they're going to do those with an event such as this.

I don't know how many streaming sites there were for this. I know a number of affiliates had the coverage in their own live players. No idea who would get the click count for that. There were also full-time streaming news services such as CBSN. My thought is that we'll probably never have an accurate count. But it's certainly higher than the 30.6M live-television-only figure that's being reported.
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