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post #17401 of 33037 Old 07-09-2017, 08:04 AM
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LAST sunday of no game of thrones or football until all the way to february.

Wonder what thrones ratings will be airing in summer.
Vacations & less tv watching BUT less competition without alot of the usual tv shows & nba playoffs on.

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post #17402 of 33037 Old 07-09-2017, 08:06 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 9, 2017

EARTH LIVE
National Geographic, 8:00 p.m. ET

Live TV specials on a grand scale are like competing at the Olympics: You work for a long, long time to get one shot at glory, with only so many elements under your control. When it works, you get the Beatles unveiling “All You Need Is Love” to a global TV audience. When it doesn’t, you get Geraldo Rivera giving a sheepish shrug in front of an empty Al Capone “vault.” Tonight, for two hours, National Geographic goes to various places around the world, where its top nature photographers are poised, in the wild and in more urban locations, to, they hope, capture animals in action across the globe, live. It’s a bold experiment – but what can we really expect to see? Carnage? Courtship? Maybe. But, just as likely, there will be more than a little dozing, scratching, and urinating. To be fair, though, that’s pretty much what Earth Live would be likely to get if it trained its cameras at my natural habitat as well…

AMERICA IN COLOR
Smithsonian, 8:00 p.m. ET

The decade covered tonight is the 1930s – and the images, in color, sometimes are vibrant and riveting. But not all vintage images, moving or still, need be colorized, an opinion I share with Eric Gould, in his latest Cold Light Reader column. [SEE BELOW]

THE NINETIES
CNN, 9:00 p.m. ET
DOCUMENTARY SERIES PREMIERE:
CNN’s latest documentary series about a specific decade, The Nineties, premieres tonight, with an expanded two-hour opener looking at, as usual, television. This time it’s called “The One About TV,” which is a clear nod to NBC’s Friends, one of the clear hits to emerge from that decade. Others include Seinfeld, NYPD Blue, The West Wing, The Sopranos, ER, The Larry Sanders Show, and the program charts the clear emergence of cable TV as a vital source of new quality television. Fair warning: I’m in here somewhere, as a talking head – but I keep doing these CNN episodes about TV because the producers keep doing them so well. I recommend The Nineties not because of my tangential involvement, but in spite of it. So watch The Nineties, and see, all over again, Ellen come out, Tony Soprano strangle a guy, and O.J. make a break for it.

THE DEFIANT ONES
HBO, 9:00 p.m. ET
DOCUMENTARY SERIES PREMIERE: Part 1 of 4.
This four-part documentary will be televised in hourly chunks tonight through Wednesday, and tells the dual, eventually intersecting stories of music figures, producers, and now moguls Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine. Their individual stories are unusual, even inspirational, but they’re retold here with an almost unquestioning, too-fawning eye. The insights about the music they produced are the best part, and allow glimpses into the recording sessions of everyone from NWA to John Lennon. Interviews with the artists make The Defiant Ones worth watching, but this enterprise feels a bit too authorized to be artistically and historically objective

AMELIA EARHART: THE LOST EVIDENCE
History, 9:00 p.m. ET

Now this is fascinating. Using all sorts of spectrum analyses and other tests, this History special examines a recently uncovered photograph, purportedly of Amelia Earhart after her final solo plane flight, to test its authenticity. And, surprisingly, it appears to pass all the tests, which may finally put an end to the mystery surrounding the aviatrix’s disappearance.

TWIN PEAKS: THE RETURN
Showtime, 9:00 p.m. ET

Two weeks ago, Twin Peaks: The Return presented a creepy episode with a restless spirit who walked around reciting poetry, crushing skulls, and asking for a light for his cigarette. One week ago, Twin Peaks went on holiday for the July 4 weekend, with no new episode. Tonight, we finally get to see Episode 9, and the show has provided an official synopsis, so we can get a hint about what to expect. Here is that synopsis, quoted in full: “This is the chair.” And the image I’ve selected may, or may not, be the chair in question. My guess is, probably not.

ALEC BALDWIN: ONE NIGHT ONLY
Spike, 9:00 p.m. ET

Spike TV has presented a few Dean Martin roast-type specials in recent years, saluting Eddie Murphy in 2012 and Don Rickles in 2014. This year’s recipient is Alec Baldwin, and the festivities were held at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. Attendees included Robert De Niro, Tracy Morgan, Julianne Moore, and even a few family members.

"PRIME SUSPECT: TENNISON" ON MASTERPIECE
PBS, 10:00 p.m. ET
SEASON FINALE: Part 3.
Stefani Martini concludes her role as young Jane Tennison in this prequel to the Prime Suspects series starring Helen Mirren. I’m hoping they’ll make more, because Martini as Tennison has been intriguing to watch – especially when she makes some sharp decisions on the case, and some very dumb decisions off it. Check local listings.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

TV/Critic's Notes (Cable)
Don’t Color (All of) My World: Let’s Not Leave Black and White Behind
By Eric Gould, TVWorthWatching.com's 'The Cold Light Trader' - Jul. 9, 2017

There’s no denying the “Oh, my God,” moment when you click on the colorized version of Mark Twain. Rather than another black and white ghost pulled from the dented file cabinet of history, he’s about as alive as can be.

But as tempting as it is, should colorization's "more alive" argument keep moving black and white TV and films to the rear as dull, unwatchable and less entertaining?

It might seem so, given the regularity of series that restore old photos and footage into color. Blood and Glory: The Civil War in Color (2015) was a sober and shocking representation of the carnage that happened within our borders and made those photos perhaps more cautionary than ever before. World War II in Color, the American Heroes Channel stalwart, with 13 episodes in 2008, did the same.

Twain, of course, isn’t a subject in the current Smithsonian Channel documentary miniseries, America in Color, which spans American history and culture from the 1920s to the ‘60s. (It premiered last weekend and will run through July, Sundays at 8 p.m. ET.) But his colorized portrait, which started making the rounds on the Internet a few years ago, is a prime case for the effect color has on audiences that would otherwise let history drone by, unsaturated.

The original aesthetic knock against colorization – the early, candy-coated Crayola versions – isn’t always a problem anymore. The makers of America in Color, Composite Films, have used the best in current digital techniques to sharpen and restore footage (right) while also applying color. Many of the clips have the clarity and feel of modern footage.

The production company also used a team of “color investigators” who went back through archives and collectible material matching up clothing colors that were authentic of the day.

As good as America in Color and other shows like it are, it nags that black and white series and news footage are somehow less, and more difficult to get air time and interest.

You get the feeling that black and white detective series like Peter Gunn, perhaps the greatest TV example of noir cinematography, are becoming the electronic equivalent of eating your peas. It’s out of the ordinary, maybe visually dry – but you know it’s good for you.

When The Artist won the Oscar for Best Picture in 2012, it won in part because of its homage to decades of film shot in black and white format. (The maybe better examples of using the genre to great success are the Coen brothers’ 2001 The Man Who Wasn’t There, or George Clooney’s 2003 Good Night and Good Luck.)

Ken Burns has made a career out of black and white history, and Turner Classic Movies' library of thousands of MGM and Warner Bros. films, the majority of them black and white classics, are accessible to TV audiences on a nightly basis. (Ted Turner took early criticism when he began colorizing films that TCM owned the rights to in the 1980s.)

There are also plenty of black and white series still around, too, on classic cable TV channels like MeTV, Decades and Antenna TV. Many veteran Hollywood cinematographers took television shows like The Fugitive (right) and Route 66 back in the ‘60s to make ends meet between film shoots. Their legacy should somehow live on as part of television’s inaugural black and white age.

Color isn’t always a fix. Or needed. A replay of Walter Cronkite’s live broadcast on the day JFK’s assassination wouldn’t be more real or more grave in color. In fact, altering it might trivialize it more than anything else.

It would be one of many cases where color would be less.

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post #17403 of 33037 Old 07-09-2017, 08:12 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Review (Cable)
‘The Defiant Ones’: Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine as Modern-Day Music Heroes
By Ken Tucker, Yahoo.com - Jul. 7, 2017

Director Allen Hughes takes two music-industry figures, Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine, and tells the story of the modern music industry in the fascinating, four-part HBO documentary The Defiant Ones. Initially, it seems as though the only thing the two have in common is the enormous amount of money each made in selling Dre’s Beats music company to Apple in 2014 — that’s how Hughes begins the story. Then the tale splits, and we’re taken back to the 1980s and 1990s, to be shown the rise of each man individually.

Iovine’s story is about the ambition of a young recording engineer-turned-producer who produced crucial early hits for people like Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, and Patti Smith. Dre’s is about a young DJ-turned-producer who pioneered the distinctive West Coast rap sound and made himself a star with the landmark 1992 album The Chronic. Both came from working-class backgrounds. Both were stubborn from the get-go in the pursuit of visions — or the sound — of music that hadn’t yet been made. Both met and became friends in moments of great success and helped carry each other to greater success.

It seems like a simple tale of two talents, but that’s only because director Hughes weaves these very different stories together so subtly, so skillfully. Filled with interviews, from Springsteen to Snoop Dogg, and loaded with archival footage of artists ranging from Tupac Shakur to Marilyn Manson at the start of their careers, The Defiant Ones demonstrates how open-minded Dre and Iovine have been as adventurous businessmen willing to risk a lot to reap huge creative and financial rewards.

This is the rare pop-culture documentary that places as much emphasis on business and capitalism as it does on art and aesthetics. Yes, The Defiant Ones — as you might guess from that title — pumps up the public images of Dre and Iovine while minimizing the negative sides of their characters and actions. And yes, the film — all four parts do indeed cohere as one long film — shies away from placing race at the forefront of many key moments. (I was struck, for example, by the way U2’s Bono praises Iovine — “There is something in him that’s attracted to rage” — in a way that, were the same words applied by someone else to Dre, would likely be received in a much less adulatory manner.)

But The Defiant Ones works on almost every level: as a primer on the music industry, as gossip, as biography, as a time capsule of the 1980s, the 1990s, and the beginning of the 21st century. Neither Iovine nor Dre is particularly eloquent about his own achievements, but The Defiant Ones does that work for them, excitingly.

The Defiant Ones airs July 9 through July 12 at 9 p.m. on HBO.

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post #17404 of 33037 Old 07-09-2017, 08:21 AM - Thread Starter
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TV/Critic's Notes (Cable)
The Best Show on TV Is Twin Peaks: The Return
By Matt Zoller Seitz, Vulture.com - Jul. 5, 2017

Twenty-seven years ago, the meteor of Twin Peaks hit television. It didn’t wipe out all the dinosaurs, but it did make them aware that they were dinosaurs, and that itself was remarkable. Conventionally conceived and executed dramas would continue to be made after David Lynch and Mark Frost unveiled their series about the eccentric denizens of a logging town, but with awareness that there were fewer rules than anyone thought.

Viewers of a certain age, myself included, remember what it was like to be a movie buff back then. If you had an affinity for the unconventional, you resigned yourself to almost never finding it on TV, except for the occasional swaggering outlier like Miami Vice, Moonlighting, Roots, M*A*S*H, All in the Family, The Prisoner, Star Trek, or The Twilight Zone. Art happened in art houses, rarely in multiplexes, and certainly not on the tube. And then, lo and behold, there was Twin Peaks, a postmodern soap opera on a commercial broadcast network that fused satire, farce, ultraviolence, and melodrama; that sashayed through its story like Audrey Horne (Sherilyn Fenn) sway-dancing in her sweater, and pleated skirt; and that wrapped the whole thing up in a shroud of mysticism and spirituality that seemed as if it was kidding until you started to suspect that it wasn’t. This was a show with youth appeal, in which attractive teenagers worried about who was dating whom, but it was also a satire on corporate ethics (or their absence), a meditation on the meaning of images and the subjectivity of memory, and a story in which ordinary suburbanites could be possessed by murderous demons and an FBI agent could solve crimes by immersing himself in a red-velvet drape-lined dream world where dwarves danced, giants delivered prophecies, and everybody talked backward.

The magic couldn’t last, of course; it rarely does. Audiences deserted the show when it became clear the writers were putting off solving the central mystery of who murdered Laura Palmer. Lynch, Frost, and their collaborators finally wrapped things up midway through season two, then spun their wheels until the shocking finale, which saw FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) being trapped in the Black Lodge by BOB (the late Frank Silva), a creature who was either a demonic puppet master or an externalized representation of the evil lurking in every human heart (or both, or neither; the show never explained stuff like that). The original Peaks proved unable to sustain that initial burst of freshness — in part, or so the maybe-apocryphal story goes, because Lynch and Frost never expected the series to get renewed and had no idea how to keep it going after its central mystery had been solved.

But the series’ decline and quick death didn’t prevent it from being recognized as an aesthetic milestone, and future producers of offbeat television — including The X-Files’ Chris Carter, The Sopranos’ David Chase, Lost and The Leftovers’ Damon Lindelof, and Hannibal and American Gods showrunner Bryan Fuller — were so gobsmacked by the series that they determined to apply Peaks’ lessons to their own work. The most important takeaway was that adventurous audiences would not just be okay with seeing once-hallowed rules broken, they might actually look forward to seeing more shows give it a shot, because Peaks had given them a taste for fresh, strange, even puzzling entertainment. In terms of its aesthetic, if not always its storytelling, Twin Peaks was consistently one or two steps ahead of its audience. No matter how intimately you thought you’d become attuned to Lynch and Frost’s wavelength, there were still moments where you sat there gaping at the screen thinking, “What the hell did I just see, and what am I supposed to make of it?” And its corollary sentiment: “I had no idea you could do that on television.”

And now, as the giant once foretold: It is happening again. Twin Peaks: The Return — the Showtime reboot of the Lynch series — didn’t just exceed its progenitor’s what-the-**** quotient right out of the gate; as it meanders through a series of daringly protected, often mysterious scenes, the show seems determined to destroy any preconceptions we had about what another Twin Peaks would look like, or even what post–Twin Peaks television could aspire to be. What Lynch and Frost are doing feels so new to TV that even showrunners whose triumphs are built on Lynchian foundations are in awe of it. At a Split Screens TV Festival event a few weeks ago, four episodes into the run of Twin Peaks: The Return, I asked David Chase if he was watching the new Peaks and whether he thought it was as good as the original. “I think it’s greater,” he said, with the uninflected certainty of a man noting that the sky is blue.

The sky is blue. Twin Peaks: The Return is a masterpiece. Books will eventually be devoted to explaining why this is; each will examine the series from a different, specific angle, and come to different conclusions about what it’s showing us and telling us. The series speaks in the language of dreams, and we interpret the sentences and pictograms differently depending on our life experience and worldview.

This is not what typically happens when you’re watching serialized television, where flights of fancy and moments of expressionism or abstraction tend to be carefully partitioned from “reality,” lest anyone get confused, or worse, frustrated. We don’t so much watch Twin Peaks: The Return as give ourselves over to the look and sound of it, as we might give ourselves over to a painting, a sculpture, or a piece of music.

The Case for Twin Peaks: The Return

[CLICK LINK AT BOTTOM FOR CLIPS]

1. The Opening Credits
The opening credits of Twin Peaks: The Return represents the show’s aesthetic in microcosm. It employs a remixed, reorchestrated version of Angelo Badalamenti’s classic theme and revisits some of the same images familiar from the original Peaks credits, including the forested Washington mountains and waterfalls, while also incorporating elements familiar from the original show that never appeared in the credits, such as the swirling closeup of the zig-zag-patterned floor in the Red Room and tight shots of the famous red drapes. What’s happening here is not merely a revisitation of Peaks imagery, but a reframing of it.

Lynch and Frost’s integration of the old cast with new characters furthers the idea of the old being subsumed into the new: They’re marginalized to some extent, in ways that might irritate viewers who wanted something close to the original series, but not obliterated. The new cast members — including Naomi Watts as Janey-E Jones, Amanda Seyfried as Shelly Johnston’s daughter, Becky, and Michael Cera as Lucy and Andy Brennan’s son, Wally Brando (at once the worst and greatest Brando impersonator of all time) — don’t fit and yet at the same time they do, perfectly. Age and mortality and the passing of generations is part of the fabric of the series, never more touchingly than when we’re watching actors (including Miguel Ferrer as Albert Rosenfield and Catherine Coulson as Margaret the Log Lady*) who died before the new series was finished.

The familiar signposts in the credits, such as the waterfalls and the mountains, are photographed from new angles, often vertigo-inducing ones, and overlaid with Red Room imagery that swirls and shimmies, creating a psychological effect akin to a hypnotist swinging a pocket watch before your eyes. This is the first of many great examples of Twin Peaks: The Return knowing what it is and what it wants to do, and encoding that knowledge within the show itself. Right away, the show tells you that it’s going to show you the familiar things from strange new angles, and not always when you expect, or in the manner that you expect them. As Jeff Wiser pointed out in a Vulture piece that focused on the show’s use of Badalamenti’s score, Twin Peaks: The Return keeps playing with the viewers’ wants, teasing us, frustrating us, then giving us what we wanted, or something unexpected that’s better than what we wanted. What if, he asked, the words The Return ended up referring to “our entire 18-hour odyssey that will culminate, in the third act, with a return to the tone, warmth, and magic of Twin Peaks?”

Also notable is the way the credits signal that the dream world and the “real” world have blurred. On the old Peaks, they were separated by a permeable membrane. When the other world intruded on this one (as when BOB committed acts of violence) the intrusion was, if not totally explained, then at least put inside a particular framework (BOB was often treated as a manifestation of the evil that lurks in the hearts of men). But in this incarnation of Peaks, the purgatorial Red Room and the spaces beyond have an emotional intensity that feels more real, or at least more viscerally powerful, than what happens in the physical world. Meanwhile, the physical world (not just the town of Twin Peaks, but cities and towns in other states) is constantly being disrupted by a Ghostbusters-like wave of extra-dimensional visitors and uncanny events, including homicidal demon-maulings and soul extractions, and visits by the Woodsmen, who look like soot-covered Depression-era hobos.

Many times in the new Peaks, Lynch and Frost overlay images from the dream world and the real world so that it’s impossible to describe how the two relate to each other. The relative size of objects do not track. The perspectives are wrong. Nothing makes sense, at least according to our established way of making sense of things. That all of these notions are hinted at, or you might say predicted, in the new credits, shows how much thought has been put into a series that many were too quick to describe as chaotic and random.

2. Cooper in the Black Lodge (Episode Two, “Part Two”)
The new Peaks has been described as experimental, and it does have a strong experimental cinema flavor. But it’s also an ongoing story that has an internal logic and a sense of forward motion, just as every other, more conventional series does, even though we might not immediately grasp why the tale is being told in this way.

What’s happening in this sequence? We don’t know, and yet we sort of do, like dogs that know what their master is saying even though they don’t speak human. The marvelous thing about the new Peaks is that it presents each new event as inexplicable and random, just a sound-and-light show with no purpose other than to dazzle or confuse, but when you go back and watch the same moments again, armed with new viewing experiences from subsequent episodes, you start to learn, or least intuit, the rules in Lynch and Frost’s real world slash dream world. This Black Lodge scene from episode two is just one example of Twin Peaks: The Return teaching you how to watch it.

Cooper makes his first attempt to leave the Black Lodge here, at the urging of the Evolution of the Arm (a spindly, leafless tree with a faceless skull-head on top, a Salvador Dali–redolent image evolved from Michael J. Anderson’s Man From Another Place in the original show). It whisper-screams, “BOB! Go now!” Cooper’s progress through the labyrinth of drapes gives way to an extraordinary low-tech moment of movie magic, straight out of a Maya Deren or Kenneth Anger experimental short, in which good Cooper parts the curtains in the “wall” of a curtained hallway and sees a stretch of Nevada highway down below, where Evil Cooper is barreling along in his muscle car. It’s like a moment in a dream where you’re walking through a location you know, only to discover a previously unnoticed door that serves as a portal to another place.

The remainder of the sequence finds Cooper attempting to reenter the physical world through the “black box” located in some sort of research facility in New York City, then being pulled back into the dimension where he’s been imprisoned for 25 years. The images of Cooper’s doll-like body falling down, or up, through starry black space return us to Lynch’s debut feature, Eraserhead. Everything about it is Lynch-Frost at their peak, but the Lynch feeling dominates. (This cable version of Twin Peaks is unmediated, sink-a-tap-into-the-brain-and-catch-the-images-in-a-coffee-cup Lynch, owing more to his post-Peaks work including Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, and Inland Empire than to films like Blue Velvet, The Elephant Man, and Wild at Heart, which were tethered, however provisionally, to reality.)

The sound design, also by Lynch, is not telling us what is happening, but making us feel it. It’s more abstract and uncanny than anything heard on television since, well, the last Twin Peaks. The Lynchian air-whooshes that fill the silences, the backward dialogue, the exaggerated footfalls, and electrical crackles are variations of things he’s done before, but the timing of the edits and the duration and volume of the more alarming noises (such as the thunderclaps, earthquake rumbles, and industrial thrums) are more extreme than anything in the old Peaks. Every image occurring in or around the Black Lodge is held a bit longer or shorter than anyone might expect, even if we have the original Lodge scenes in our heads. This reshaping of the familiar into the alien induces a sense that the normal rules of physics that govern human movement through time and space aren’t the only things that have been suspended; our ability to acquire and process information is different as well. A good portion of the new Peaks seems to have been made by an alien who studied narrative cinema before making its own attempt at a David Lynch movie. The old TV stomping grounds have become terra incognita. Like Dale Cooper after his re-emergence, when he’s poured into the empty vessel that was once a man named Dougie Jones, we have to learn everything all over again.

3. “Take Five” (Episode Four, “Part Four”)
Although my favorite part of this sequence is the end in the kitchen, with Cooper-as-Dougie, Janey-E, and their son, Sonny Jim (Pierce Gagnon), I’ve included the lead-up because it gives you a sense of how wide the show’s aesthetic bandwidth is. Cooper-as-Dougie sits in his bedroom in a typically childlike, dumbfounded state of just Being There, then glimpses Mike in the Red Room warning him, “You’ve been tricked! Now one of you must die!” We don’t know exactly what that means yet, but Cooper-Dougie seems to register that it’s somehow important. Then there’s a moment between Dougie and his son that reminds us of how sweet and silly Lynch can be when he isn’t filling us with existential dread: The boy gives him the thumbs-up, and he returns the gesture (which was once a Cooper signature) and then spins around, making the child laugh.

What follows is one of the most charming moments in Lynch’s filmography: a slow scene of Dougie entering the kitchen in his green jacket, tasting pancakes and then coffee (which he spits out, though its familiar taste causes him to grin and exclaim, “Hi!” to Janey-E). The entire scene is scored to Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five,” which plays out for several minutes rather than being truncated in the interest of pacing.

The first time I saw this scene, I went out and had pancakes for the first time in a long while. It’s the kind of scene that makes you think about the simplest, deepest significance of ordinary routines or actions that you’d otherwise take for granted. But it is simultaneously a callback to the original series, which presented Cooper with the possibility of an ordinary married life with a house and kids (via Annie, played by Heather Graham, a 1950s-wholesome blond bombshell sweetheart who could be Naomi Watts’s sister) only to cruelly snatch that possibility away.

Though nobody but Lynch and Frost could confirm this — and I doubt they would because it’s not their style, and you probably wouldn’t want them to, anyway — the Brubeck song as soundtrack for pancakes and coffee seems like yet another instance of an individual storytelling choice standing in for the show’s aesthetic as a whole. It has been said that improvisation is composition sped up, while composition is improvisation slowed down. Jazz like Brubeck’s encapsulates both principles, allowing for momentary, delightful flourishes within a rigid structure that always moves forward at the same measured pace. And, like Twin Peaks: The Return as a whole, great jazz reminds us that much of the greatest art is hard to pigeonhole as either purposeful or random. At a certain point, the viewer or listener has to stop trying to fit the work into a particular, predetermined category and simply respond to the thing as it is, on the screen or on vinyl or on the page or the canvas, completing the artist’s vision by thinking about it and feeling it.

How We Picked It

There was never any question that Twin Peaks: The Return would win Best Show in this year’s Vulture TV Awards. The matter was decided after only four episodes had aired, notwithstanding the fact that last year’s awards stipulated that a program could not be considered for Best Show unless it had completed its current season’s run by a particular date in June. Adhering to tradition struck us as folly in the face of artists whose importance is rooted in their disregard for how things have always been done, so we fudged that rule. As well we should have.

In comparison, even recent shows that aspired to Lynchian levels of invention — such as The Leftovers, American Gods, Legion, The Get Down, Sense8, Samurai Jack, Paolo Sorrentino’s HBO series The Young Pope, Donald Glover’s Atlanta, which he described as “Twin Peaks with rappers” — seem tame compared to whatever The Return is up to. In mastery of most of the fundamentals — characterization, performance, atmosphere, direction, editing music, wardrobe, and so on — the new Peaks matches any other series on the air. The colors and textures and inventive editing of the other series cited here are impressive, until you watch Lynch and Frost cut loose in the Black Lodge, or track a cockroach-frog from its birthplace at an atomic test site to its final resting place inside a sleeping girl’s mouth, or follow the childlike Dougie through a casino as he hits jackpot after jackpot, crying “Hellooooooo!” and then following a soul-flame as it dances above a row of slot machines. The series has that Lynchian knack for showing us the face of pure evil — often represented by toxic men who seem to enjoy life only when they’re breaking and dominating women and other men — and then turning around and giving us moments of sublime silliness, such as Wally Brando’s monologue, in which he gives his parents permission to turn his childhood bedroom into a study, then regales them with his adventures crisscrossing a nation while thinking about “Lewis and his friend Clark, the first caw-caysians to see this part of the world.”

The only area in which the new Peaks might have been deemed lacking — during the first couple of episodes of its run, not now — is writing, but only if you judged the show by conventional measurements of Quality TV: clearly delineated setups and payoffs that don’t last a second longer than they have to; snappy dialogue, and lots of it; big moments where the character deals directly with whatever he or she is feeling. Like the old Peaks, this one comes at things sideways or from an extreme low or high angle, rarely head on. Some of the show’s most startling, powerful set pieces — such as that young boy’s bloody death in a car wreck, followed by his soul’s ascension into heaven, Harry Dean Stanton’s ancient face bearing witness — feel like stand-alone short films. They might connect with the main plot later on, or they might still feel like thematically related one-offs. This is the case in all of David Lynch’s work, and we accept it, because it’s one of the characteristics that makes Lynch Lynch.

No, this is truly a series without genre, unless “Twin Peaks-like” can be considered a genre — and if it can, it still wins.

In my first piece about the new Peaks, I likened the super-slow-jam rhythm to a painter unveiling an mosaic painting of 18 panels, one panel at a time; I now realize that the show is that, but it is also not that, and several other things besides that. The new Peaks exists, like other Lynch films, somewhere between narrative storytelling and pure abstraction, between classical and jazz, between the real world and the dream world.

But here, too, we see an example of a professional viewer trying to pigeonhole art that refuses to be classified in a measurable, meticulous way. Lynch is a narrative filmmaker and an experimental filmmaker, extremely conventional in some ways and (after all these decades) shockingly fresh in others. There’s no sliding scale that entirely captures what he’s about. There’s no metaphor that accurately represents the experience of watching the series.

The nature of mainstream criticism — and social-media drive-by tweets and “takes” by people who aren’t part of the media-entertainment complex but are obsessed by it — is to ask what predetermined slot a work fits into, then declare it a good example of that sort of work, or a bad example, or a problematic one, and if so, in what way, and to what degree. (Should the work be boycotted, merely condemned, ignored? If you like it anyway, are you a bad person?) Once certain boxes have been checked, we can move along and figure out what work to target next. All entertainment, all art, becomes an experiential blur, like landscapes in a country we did not truly visit, but merely rode through on a bullet train while staring at our phones.

At a time when people are not interested in reading, watching, or absorbing anything, but would prefer to skip ahead to the part where they give their opinions — thus the proliferation of “think pieces” condemning films based on their trailers or picking them apart as if they were complete works, and comments by people angrily deconstructing the headline of a piece they haven’t read — Lynch and Frost are forcing everybody to take a slow train without Wi-Fi. By presenting the story in such a gradual way, week by week, without advance screeners for anyone, including critics, they are leaving us no choice but to experience the ride as a journey. They are forcing us to read a book or look out the window for hours or talk to our neighbors, instead of anxiously scrolling through our phones like a chicken scratching for feed pellets. They are leaving us no choice but to watch, and I mean really watch, the thing they’ve made, and have fully thought-out opinions on it, not glib “takes.”

That’s audacious, and desperately needed.

No other series takes as many chances as Twin Peaks: The Return, in story, image, sound, and presentation. No other series feels as strange, new, and confounding. Certainly none are capable of indulging in a nearly hour-long sound-and-light show that expands its own mythology and advances its main plot while also offering a surreal alternative history of World War II and the consequences of playing God with the atom bomb, as Twin Peaks: The Return did in its eighth episode. That hour alone makes the rest of narrative television seem imaginatively impoverished. It is so completely unlike anything ever conceived by anyone working in television at any point in its 70-year history as a commercial medium that even if the ten remaining episodes of this show consisted of a black screen with a timecode at the bottom, it still would have won this award.

Twin Peaks: The Return feels like another moment of reckoning for the medium — another meteor. Where do we go from here?

http://www.vulture.com/2017/07/vultu...he-return.html
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)
From Zap2it.com's TV Grid - Jul. 9, 2017

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos
(R - Mar. 5)
8PM - Celebrity Family Feud: MLB Legends vs NBA Legends; NFL All-Stars vs NFL Legends
9PM - Steve Harvey's FUNDERDOME
10PM - The $100,000 Pyramid: Cam Newton vs. Brandon Marshall; Eric Decker vs. Apolo Ohno

CBS:
7PM - 60 Minutes
8PM - Big Brother
9PM - Candy Crush (Series Premiere)
10PM - NCIS: Los Angeles
(R - Jan. 15)

NBC:
7PM - Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly (Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos; singer Ed Sheeran)
8PM - The Wall
(R - Jun. 29)
9PM - American Ninja Warrior (120 min.)
(R - Jun. 26)

FOX:
7PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Jun. 11)
7:30PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Oct. 9)
8PM - The Simpsons
(R - May 7)
8:30PM - Family Guy
(R - Feb. 19)
9PM - American Grit

PBS:
8PM - My Mother and Other Strangers on Masterpiece
9PM - Grantchester on Masterpiece
10PM - Prime Suspect: Tennison on Masterpiece (Finale, 90 min.)

UNIVISION:
6:30PM - Copa Oro 2017 CONCACAF: Curazao vs. Jamaica (LIVE)
9PM - Copa Oro 2017 CONCACAF: México vs. El Salvador (LIVE)

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie: Skyfall (2012)
10PM - Don Francisco Te Invita

TLC:
8PM - 90 Day Fiancé (2 hrs. 6 min.)
10:06PM - The Spouse House (Series Premiere, 62 min.)

ESPN:
8PM - MLB Baseball: Detroit Tigers at Cleveland Indians (LIVE)

BRAVO:
8PM - The Real Housewives of Potomac: Reunion, Part One
9PM - Invite Only Cabo (Season Finale)

CNN:
9PM - The Nineties (Miniseries Premiere, 120 min.)

AMC:
9PM - Fear the Walking Dead (2 hrs. 10 min.)
* * * *
11:10PM - Talking Dead

TNT:
9PM - Claws

SPIKE:
9PM - One Night Only: Alec Baldwin (Special, 120 min.)

STARZ:
9PM - Power

SHOWTIME:
9PM - Twin Peaks: The Return
10PM - I'm Dying Up Here

HBO:
9PM - The Defiant Ones: Part 1 (Miniseries Premiere)
10PM - The Defiant Ones: Part 1
(R)
* * * *
11PM - Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
(R - Jun. 11)

ADULT SWIM:
11:30PM - Mike Tyson Mysteries
11:45PM - Mike Tyson Mysteries
(R - Jan. 16, 2016)
Midnight - Decker: Unsealed (Season Finale)


http://tvlistings.zap2it.com/tvlisti...000&aid=zap2it

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LAST sunday of no game of thrones or football until all the way to february.

Wonder what thrones ratings will be airing in summer.
Vacations & less tv watching BUT less competition without alot of the usual tv shows & nba playoffs on.
I'm sure many DVR's will be busy!

I really ought to act more like a woman of my advancing years, but I’m growing old disgracefully.
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I'm sure many DVR's will be busy!
Not my sister's. She cut the cord after the 4th of July holiday (with my assistance to make the process as painless as possible) and is now cable/DVR-free for the first time in decades. All that kept her from doing it sooner was HBO's "The Leftovers." If she had only waited a couple of days she could have joined the July 7th party. No streaming service for sis, though, she'll have to get by using Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime. You know, first world problems.
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Not my sister's. She cut the cord after the 4th of July holiday (with my assistance to make the process as painless as possible) and is now cable/DVR-free for the first time in decades. All that kept her from doing it sooner was HBO's "The Leftovers." If she had only waited a couple of days she could have joined the July 7th party. No streaming service for sis, though, she'll have to get by using Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime. You know, first world problems.
Hulu now has HBO and Cinemax as addons. Or is that what you meant by July 7th party?
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post #17409 of 33037 Old 07-09-2017, 02:03 PM
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Or is that what you meant by July 7th party?
July 7th was "National Cut The Cord Day".
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post #17410 of 33037 Old 07-09-2017, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post
Not my sister's. She cut the cord after the 4th of July holiday (with my assistance to make the process as painless as possible) and is now cable/DVR-free for the first time in decades. All that kept her from doing it sooner was HBO's "The Leftovers." If she had only waited a couple of days she could have joined the July 7th party. No streaming service for sis, though, she'll have to get by using Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime. You know, first world problems.


What about a nice OTA setup with a TiVo Bolt?
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^^^ She's not "one of us," so no interest whatsoever. Believe me, I tried.
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post #17412 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 05:09 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Notes (Cable)
Kristin Kreuk Starrer 'Burden of Truth' Loses Showrunners
By Etan Vlessing, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog

The Kristin Kreuk starrer Burden of Truth has lost its showrunners.

Noelle Carbone and Adriana Maggs have stepped down as showrunners on the legal drama that stars Kreuk as a big-city lawyer passed over for partnership who returns to her hometown to take on what she thinks is a simple case, only to find herself in a fight for justice for a group of sick girls.

"Noelle and Adriana were both key to shaping the first season of the ICF Films/eOne series, but at this time they have left to pursue other projects," an eOne representative stated on Friday. TV credits for Carbone include Rookie Blue and Saving Hope. Maggs wrote and directed Grown Up Movie Star, the Sundance award winner that starred Tatiana Maslany.

Kreuk is best known for playing Lana Lang on The CW's Smallville and then starring in the younger-skewing network’s Beauty and the Beast.

Burden of Truth, previously titled Burden of Proof, is set to shoot 10 one-hour episodes in Winnipeg, Manitoba, this summer, ahead of a winter 2018 debut. There's no word yet on new showrunners to board the series from co-producers Entertainment One, ICF Films and Eagle Vision.

The investigative drama was created by Brad Simpson (Rookie Blue). Executive producers are Ilana Frank, Linda Pope, Jocelyn Hamilton and Kreuk.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/liv...unners-1019415
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'True Blood' Star Nelsan Ellis Dies at 39

Nelsan Ellis, the actor who starred in HBO's True Blood as Lafayette Reynolds, has died, his manager Emily Gerson Saines, told The Hollywood Reporter.

He was 39.
Oh my, how horrible. So young! He was absolutely EXELLENT in True Blood.
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Obituary
Ji-Tu Cumbuka, ‘Roots,’ ‘Brewster’s Millions’ actor, dead at 77
By Kate Feldman, New York Daily News - Jul. 9, 2017

Ji-Tu Cumbuka, who had roles in “Roots,” “Brewster’s Millions” and “Harlem Nights,” died Tuesday in Atlanta.

He was 77.

“I (talked) to my Uncle Ji-Tu last week after he spoke to his doctor and he told me wasn't going to be here much longer then a week,” his niece, Amber Holifield, wrote on Facebook.

“Once it registered what he was telling me, I ask him if he leaves then what do I do?? He said (as he would) ‘Deal with it... I'm dealing with it’ ... so l laugh and said you iiiss right!”

Cumbuka appeared as slave Wrestler in Alex Haley’s Emmy-winning TV miniseries “Roots,” as well as several movies with Richard Pryor, including “Harlem Nights,” “Moving” and “Brewster’s Millions.”

In 1973, he played former NBA guard Oscar Robertson in “Maurie,” the biodrama about the life of Maurice Stokes.

He also had TV roles in “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” “Walker, Texas Ranger” and “In the Heat of the Night” and as a series regular on “A Man Called Sloane” in 1979.

In 2011, Cumbuka published his autobiography, “A Giant to Remember: The Black Actor in Hollywood.”

His name in Swahili translates to the book’s title: “Ji-Tu” means “giant” and “Cumbuka” means “to remember.”

“He played the Wrestler in the original ‘ROOTS,’ one of Kunta's primary mentors; as he was for me on my first gig!” LeVar Burton tweeted Sunday.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertain...icle-1.3313501
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TV Review (Cable)
‘Will,’ TNT’s Punk Rock Take on William Shakespeare
By Sonia Saraiya, Variety.com - Jul. 9, 2017

The oddest assumption “Will” makes is in assuming that William Shakespeare, the OG of the English language, needs the patina of punk rock to make him cool. I’m no expert on cool, but haven’t we all trod this ground many times before? The executive producer and writer of the pilot, Craig Pearce, wrote the screenplay for “Romeo + Juliet,” along with director Baz Luhrmann and, of course, the Bard himself. It’s been over 20 years since that film and “Shakespeare in Love”; about a decade since teen movies “She’s the Man” and “Deliver Us From Eva” applied the Shakespeare formula to high school. To belabor the point: Joss Whedon’s black-and-white, modern-day “Much Ado About Nothing” is just five years old, 2014’s “The Hollow Crown” on BBC cast well-known heartthrobs like Tom Hiddleston and Benedict Cumberbatch in the lead roles, and for pete’s sake, “The Lion King” is based on “Hamlet.”

But despite all of this thoroughly modern Shakespeare, “Will” is here — and determined, with comical intensity, to demonstrate just how rad Willy Shakes and the Elizabethan era can be. The result is a wildly anachronistic historical drama with tons of flair, albeit flair that is neither original nor meaningful. In its defense, however, it manages to be fun — eventually. The pilot, written by Pearce and directed by executive producer Shekhar Kapur, is a plodding, overwrought mess that gives Shakespeare (Laurie Davidson) a Catholic subplot, a tortured love interest, and prompt theatrical success. It also, quite painfully, places him in a Renaissance pub’s “rap battle,” as if “Will” is a trying-too-hard English teacher informing you that Shakespeare was the original hip-hop artist of the streets.

It might just fly if “Will” was a little less self-serious. From the very first frame, Will wants to become Shakespeare; there is no process of discovering his own talents as he discovers what place the world might have for him. At times a scene will open on him searching for the right line of verse for the occasion, and half the time he says word for word exactly the lines that will become canon. Perhaps Shakespeare was just this irritatingly composed, but this effortless writing process is less fun to watch than the arc of episodes 3 and 4, when he realizes he has no idea how to break a story — and is just one playwright among many, trying to earn enough money for rent. Once “Will” settles into the day-to-day drama of producing something worth reading, it’s a lot more fun to watch.

It does not help that “Will” is saturated with a very particular, very jarring aesthetic. The show draws from, apparently, films like “A Knight’s Tale” and the 1978 film “Jubilee” to link London’s punk rock fury and decadence with the milieu of Renaissance theatre. The audience for “Two Gentlemen of Verona,” Will’s first real play, is a raucous crowd of tattooed hooligans with fierce eyeliner game. Richard Burbage (Mattias Inwood), an adorably entitled but talentless leading man, strolls into one scene in the pilot wearing a motorcycle jacket trimmed with leopard print lapels; the walls in their dingy alleyway are covered with mass-produced color posters. And for a country that wouldn’t establish a foothold in India until 1612, there are an awful lot of colorful ethnic fabrics cladding the hand-to-mouth peasants of the street. This whirlwind of culture offers some fascinating opportunities for a more complex history of Britain than is normally afforded onscreen — for example, several of the Londoners are black, because the first black communities in England date back to the Tudor era, and of course Shakespeare wrote black characters into his plays. (She doesn’t appear in the first episodes released to critics, but Jasmin Savoy Brown has a regular role as the “Dark Lady” of Will’s sonnets.) But these strokes of brilliance get lost in the muddle. It’s hard to tell the fantasy from the historical complexity, and as a result “Will” really stretches the imagination, even when it’s saying something true.

And honestly, “Will” has enough bells and whistles as it is. As he keeps writing, Will becomes closer to Kit Marlowe (Jamie Campbell Bower), who in this imagining is a gay orgy host and opium smoker — erratic and mercurial and occasionally kissing Will just for the heck of it. But Will is caught up in illicit desire for the educated daughter of his erstwhile patron, James Burbage (Colm Meany) — the pretty Alice (Olivia DeJonge), who discovers early on that Will’s left a wife and three kids in his village.

In the show’s most baffling creative decision, much of the storytelling is devoted to Will’s secret Catholicism. By the third episode, “Will” routinely cuts from the main action to show yet another Catholic being gruesomely tortured by Topcliffe (Ewen Bremner), a professional persecutor for the Queen. The show cuts away from him only to return to Will clutching his rosary while haunted by the ghost of his father. (His father, like Hamlet’s, is a bit of a pill, always yammering on about duty.) It’s hard to square Will’s teeth-gnashing sense of Catholic duty with the freewheeling theater kid he is otherwise.

There are moments of surprisingly nimble comedy — like when Alice has to meet with a potential suitor and his nearly-deaf mother has to shout her advice about fertility across the room, or when Richard learns exactly one line of acting advice and starts using it as a pick-up line. There are also scenes of truly poignant tragedy, such as when a young street rat with a mullet (Lukas Rolfe) has to hide under his sister’s bed while she services a john. But it is bogged down by torture, ghosts, secret congregations, sex parties, and improbable fashion, making for a herky-jerky tonal trip through an unfamiliar time.

All this material is part of the effort to show where Shakespeare got the material to become Shakespeare, and some of it, at least, is quite valid. But Shakespeare the man wasn’t a romantic combination of all of his heroes’ and villains’ plotlines, nor was his life composed of the atmospheres of each of his comedies and tragedies. Like all our great writers, he was above all else an incisive observer of human nature. But our Will, like “Will,” is a bit naive and artless, which only serves to make the flashes of brilliant poetry seem terribly out of place. Lead Davidson, to his credit, plays every note of his character with sincere intensity, and he certainly looks the part of the visionary young poet. But it frequently seems as if the show is convinced it is telling us something new and vital, when it has in fact taken Joseph Fiennes’ lovelorn Will Shakespeare, added Catholic guilt and sex parties, and plopped it into a never-ending punk concert. “Will” could stand to relax a little; it might find it has more fun that way.

'Will'
Drama, X episodes (4 reviewed): TNT, Mon. July 10, 9 p.m. 60 min.


http://variety.com/2017/tv/reviews/t...re-1202489775/
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post #17416 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 05:23 AM - Thread Starter
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TV Notes (Cable)
Hit the Floor season 4 to have all-female writing staff
By Nivea Serrao, EW.com - Jul. 9, 2017

Season 4 of BET basketball drama Hit the Floor will feature an all-female writing staff, show creator James LaRosa revealed this weekend.

“Hit the Floor S4 writers room starts tomorrow and I am pumpedddd omgggggggg,” he tweeted along with the image of a keyboard key with the word “Yaaassssss” on it. He then added, “Stoked to say the entire writing staff for #HitTheFloor S4 will be female. They came, they saw, they slayed.”

The show, which previously aired on VH1, follows members of the (fictional) Los Angeles Devils basketball team and some of the women on the supporting L.A. Devil Girls dance squad.

This isn’t the first time a television show has employed an all-female creative team behind the camera. The Ava DuVernay- and Oprah Winfrey-produced OWN Series Queen Sugar hired only female directors for the entirety of its first season, Hulu’s British import Harlots has all-female writing and directing teams, and Marvel’s Jessica Jones will be featuring a full slate of female directors for its second season.

In recent years, the lack of representation of women both in front of and behind the camera has come under greater scrutiny in the film and television industries, with more and more speaking out against the trend. In the last few months, X-Files actress Gillian Anderson called out the latest installment of the show’s revival for not hiring a single female writer, and Fate of the Furious star Michelle Rodriguez, who has been a part of the franchise since the beginning, threatened to leave if the series didn’t “show some love to the women” in the next movie.

BET hasn’t yet announced a premiere date for Hit the Floor season 4 and did not immediately respond to EW’s request for comment.

http://ew.com/tv/2017/07/09/hit-floo...aff-all-women/
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TV/Business Notes
In Hollywood, Asian American actors see few lead roles, and pay discrepancies when they land one
By Meg James and David Ng, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' - Jul. 8, 2017

Korean American actor Edward Hong has played characters in dozens of TV shows and movies over the years, including as “Math Olympian Dude,” “Chinese Man #2” and, in a top-rated network sitcom, “Male Night Nurse.”

Soon, he will appear in the independent film “Please Stand By” as the “Cinnabon Guy.”

“In Hollywood, there are a lot of opportunities, but it is always for small roles with one-liners,” Hong said in an interview. “If you want to be a store owner, the nail salon lady or the IT-tech guy, those are the parts, but rarely do we get a chance to be the main character.”

He’s not bitter, he said, just realistic about the plight of being an Asian American actor in Hollywood.

Decades of racist caricatures — think Mickey Rooney playing the buck-toothed Mr. Yunioshi in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” — have given way to an industry that is more inclusive, but where leading roles remain scarce. This week served as a stark reminder that even those who have reached some of the highest levels in the entertainment industry still face obstacles. Two prominent actors — Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park — quit CBS’ “Hawaii Five-0” amid claims they were paid less than their white counterparts.

The controversy has motivated actors to be more vocal about what they say have been decades of inequities.

“The path to equality is rarely easy,” Kim wrote in a message on Facebook, thanking fans for supporting him on “Hawaii Five-0.”

Two years after the #OscarsSoWhite campaign shined a harsh light on Hollywood’s hiring and casting practices, some progress has been made. The film and TV industries have shown a heightened awareness of diversity and greenlighted more films with diverse casts. Television programs headlined by minorities, such as Fox’s “Empire” and ABC’s “black-ish,” have turned in strong ratings performances. Netflix’s “Master of None” stars the popular comedian Aziz Ansari, whose parents emigrated from India.

There are few other Asian Americans in leading roles beyond ABC’s “Fresh Off the Boat,” loosely based around the experiences of an Asian immigrant family in the 1980s, ABC’s “Designated Survivor,” which depicts a determined FBI agent played by Maggie Q and AMC's martial arts drama “Into the Badlands,” which stars Daniel Wu as a talented warrior.

But problems persist, particularly for Asian Americans. Filmmakers have tried to fend off charges of “whitewashing” even as they continue to rely on white actors to portray Asians on screen. Netflix’s upcoming adaptation of a Japanese manga, “Death Note,” stirred controversy when a producer, in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, said the production searched for Asian actors but “couldn’t find the right person,” in large part because actors from Asia “didn’t speak the perfect English.”

That came after an outcry over Scarlett Johansson’s casting as the heroine in “Ghost in the Shell,” this year’s remake of a classic Japanese anime. In Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” last year, Tilda Swinton played the Ancient One, a character that is an Asian man in the original comics. Even the starring role in the big-budget Chinese period action film “The Great Wall” went to Matt Damon.

“There is a bias against Asian Americans,” said Nancy Wang Yuen, a sociology professor at Biola University who studies race and ethnicity in film and television. “I feel like we are invisible in society. We are nondescript and in a way dehumanized by not existing in scenes or having speaking roles. We are just part of the backdrop.”

Asian actors have been getting more work these days, in large part because of the flow of money from China. Movie studio executives hoping to enhance a film’s financial prospects in China, the world’s second-largest film market, have rounded out their casts with Asian faces. But those are often background roles.

“The Chinese actors say: ‘We are just flower vases. We don’t speak; we just stand there and look pretty,’ ” Hong said.

Asian Americans say they face unique challenges because of ingrained stereotypes, including a perception that Asians are not complainers and thus will show up and dutifully do the work. “We are always the model minority,” Hong said.

Several people interviewed said part of the problem is that Asians don’t fit the studio chiefs’ vision of a leading man.

“I don’t believe people in showbiz are inherently racist,” said Christine Toy Johnson, a New York-based actress who has a recurring role on FX’s “The Americans” and recently appeared in guest spots on CBS’ “Madam Secretary” and USA’s “Mr. Robot.”

“There are different lenses with which we see things,” she said.

Ren Hanami, chairwoman of the SAG-AFTRA guild’s Asian Pacific American Media Committee, said she believes the problem is “systemic.”

“Most of the heads of studios are white men, and there will be some women and people of color,” Hanami said. “And then you have the creators of the show — most come from writing and Ivy League schools. All the people making those decisions are writing about themselves.”

USC’s Media, Diversity and Social Change Initiative last year found that just 28.3% of all speaking characters were from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups — a much lower percentage than the population at large. Asian Americans were particularly invisible. At least half of movies and TV shows, including on streaming services, “fail to portray one speaking or named Asian or Asian American on screen,” the USC report found.

Hollywood executives are “still stuck in a mid-20th century mindset,” said Chris Tashima, an L.A.-based actor and Oscar-winning short-film maker. “It’s the default for the creators of content to think ‘white’ when they’re thinking of stars.”

“Why aren’t there any Asian American stars? You need to cast the person for it to happen,” Tashima said.

CBS has been blistered by criticism before for its formula of casting white men in lead roles, then building shows around them. Although “Hawaii Five-0” boasts a large and diverse cast, the network considered Kim and Park supporting actors to the show’s two white leading men, Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan.

Both had major acting credits before landing their parts on “Hawaii Five-0,” a 2010 reboot of the popular 1960s detective show that consistently ranks in the top 20 in ratings. Kim was a fan favorite on ABC’s “Lost,” and Park, a Canadian actress, was a main character on “Battlestar Galactica.”

“CBS promoted ‘Hawaii Five-0’ from the outset as an ensemble show with four co-stars, and it was clear that the two Asian American co-stars played absolutely crucial roles in the series,” said Daniel Mayeda, an entertainment attorney at Leopold, Petrich & Smith. “Without them, there is little to distinguish ‘Hawaii Five-0’ from any other cop show on the air.”

Contract renegotiations stalled this spring when the television studio, CBS Productions, tried to lock in deals to bring the actors back for the show’s eighth season, which begins production next week. Both refused after being offered less money per episode than O’Loughlin and Caan.

This week, CBS and producers rejected the notion that Kim and Park were treated unfairly. Kim, for example, was offered a huge jump in salary — to about $195,000 an episode, which was $5,000 an episode less than what Caan and O’Loughlin receive, according to a person close to the production who was not authorized to divulge details of the sensitive negotiations. Kim also was offered a new production deal on CBS’ lot in Studio City. His pay before the offer is not known.

“Daniel and Grace have been important and valued members of ‘Hawaii Five-0’ for seven seasons,” CBS said in a statement. “We did not want to lose them and tried very hard to keep them with offers for large and significant salary increases.”

Kim and Park declined to comment.

Peter Lenkov, co-creator and executive producer of “Hawaii Five-0,” on Thursday stressed that the show was proud of its large and inclusive cast.

“The truth is this: Both actors chose not to extend their contracts,” he said. “CBS was extremely generous and proactive in their renegotiation talks. So much so, the actors were getting unprecedented raises, but in the end, they chose to move on. No one wanted to see them go — they are irreplaceable.”

Park, who lives in Vancouver when not shooting the show in Hawaii, had asked to dramatically reduce the number of episodes she appeared in, according to the knowledgeable source. “After being away from her family for seven years, I understood Grace’s decision to leave,” Lenkov said.

Critics on social media said the studio’s insistence it had offered the actors significant raises illustrates they had been underpaid for years.

There is little hard data proving Asian Americans in Hollywood are systematically underpaid. The Screen Actors Guild and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists said it doesn’t track compensation beyond union minimums because the information is often kept under wraps by the studios, agents and individual actors.

Experts said this week’s furor over the “Hawaii Five-0” salary gap, and Kim’s taking a stand on the issue, could mark a turning point.

“Five years ago, this wouldn’t have gotten this kind of attention,” said Janet Yang, producer of “The People vs. Larry Flynt” and “The Joy Luck Club.” She and others credited the #OscarsSoWhite controversy for encouraging Asian Americans to stand up for their rights.

“More people are emboldened now,” Yang said. “The African American community has led the conversation for so long, and now it’s expanded to other minorities.”

Social media and the rise of niche entertainment channels, YouTube and streaming services such as Netflix also have spurred traditional Hollywood players to be more inclusive.

“Because you have so many platforms where people can tell stories from underrepresented faces and voices, audiences are driving all these decision-makers to reevaluate all the things they greenlight,” said Adam Moore, SAG-AFTRA’s national director of equal employment opportunity and diversity.

Johnson, the actress, couldn’t recall auditioning for a lead in any pilot in the 20 years before “Fresh Off the Boat.” “That tells me a lot about where we are,” said Johnson, though she says there’s still room for improvement.

Tashima, the Oscar-winning filmmaker, agreed. “Growing up, I always felt second-rate because I wasn’t like the kids you saw on TV,” he said. “I’m seeing a lot of change now. It’s not as much as we want.”

http://www.latimes.com/business/holl...708-story.html
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TV/Critic's Notes (Production)
James Franco Will Reportedly Play a ‘High-Plains Drifter’ in a TV Episode Directed by the Coen Brothers
By David Canfield, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Jul. 9, 2017

The Coen Brothers’ anticipated six-episode Western anthology series The Ballad of Buster Scruggs is reportedly close to casting James Franco for what sounds like a very James Franco role.

According to the Tracking Board, Franco will star opposite Ralph Ineson and Stephen Root in the “Near Algodones” installment, playing “a high-plains drifter whose own fecklessness dogs his attempts at bank robbery and cattle driving.” (Others cast in the series include Tim Blake Nelson, Tyne Daly, and Zoe Kazan.)

Setting aside the wonderful image of James Franco haplessly herding cattle for a moment — let’s hope he hasn’t shaved that ’70s mustache just yet — the news comes on the heels of Franco completing filming on about a dozen other projects that are awaiting release, including David Simon’s HBO drama The Deuce and his own (apparently quite good) film The Disaster Artist, based on the making of The Room.

So to keep track: Within the next year or so, we’ll see Franco immerse himself in the world of ’70s porn, re-create the bizarre accent of Tommy Wiseau — he at least got some extra practice on that one — and play a feckless drifter under the direction of the Coens. Dare to predict what’s next?

http://www.vulture.com/2017/07/james...tv-series.html
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TV Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 10, 2017

WHOSE LINE IS IT ANYWAY?
The CW, 9:00 p.m. ET

Wil Wheaton, the young crew member on Star Trek The Next Generation and Sheldon’s nemesis on The Big Bang Theory, shows up tonight to play with the resident improv comics of Whose Line Is It Anyway?

THE DEFIANT ONES
HBO, 8:00 p.m. ET
Part 2.
This documentary on Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine continues, with the same obsequious perspective on their respective musical careers. The stories told are good ones, though, if you can accept them as overly fawning. One, in tonight’s installment, explains the origins of the Tom Petty-Stevie Nicks duet on “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.” Not to be Petty, but it's one of the best stories told tonight...

WILL
TNT, 9:00 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
ABC’s current Still Star-Crossed provides a sequel of sorts to William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, but without any real verve, style, or reason to watch. Tonight’s new TNT series, Will, seeks inspiration from Shakespeare, too, but this time from the playwright, not his plays. It’s been done before, of course, in Shakespeare in Love and in several other attempts, incuding the 1978 British miniseries Will Shakespeare: His Life and Times, starring Tim Curry. But this new outing is by Craig Pearce, who also wrote some shaken-and-stirred Shakespeare with the 1996 film Romeo + Juliet, directed by Baz Luhrmann and starring a very young Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes. This time, Shakespeare, as an aspiring local playwright hoping to make his mark in the big city, is played by Laurie Davidson. He arrives in London to the throbbing tune of “London Calling” by the Clash, and many of the city’s rakish residents sport such anachronistic items of apparel as spiked collars and leather and chains. Yes, it’s a curious mixture of period and punk – and while it doesn’t completely work, it comes close enough to spend a few hours with to watch it try and find its way. One problem is that poor Will is overshadowed by some of his supporting characters – specifically, Jamie Campbell Bower as rival playwright Christopher Marlowe and Olivia DeJonge as the daughter of the theater impresario (the reliable Colm Meaney), who matches young Will in vocabulary and imagination as well as good looks. The pieces don’t all fit, but whenever the company performs in the approximation of the Old Globe, Will is fun indeed. Turns out, the Bard was right: the play’s the thing.

P.O.V.: "LAST MEN IN ALEPPO"
PBS, 10:00 p.m. ET

This season, P.O.V. has been highlighting films about the crisis in Syria – and tonight, the program ends that multi-week salute by showing the TV premiere of Last Men in Aleppo, a documentary about the volunteer organization known as the White Helmets, who provide aid to residents caught in the cross-fire of the uprisings and military crackdowns in Syria. Last Men in Aleppo, directed by Feras Fayyad, just won the Documentary Grand Jury Prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Check local listings.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

TV Review (Cable)
A Millennial Shakespeare in TNT’s ‘Will’
By David Hinckley, TVWorthWatching.com's 'All Along the Watchtower' - Jul. 10, 2017

Imagine William Shakespeare not as a dignified and revered master playwright, but as a scrappy young dreamer who looks like he could have stepped out of a Twilight movie.

Imagine Shakespeare as an ambitious millennial, in other words, which is what TNT has done with its new series Will, which premieres with back-to-back episodes Monday at 9 p.m. ET.

Laurie Davidson plays the young Shakespeare, who we meet just as he’s leaving his wife and three young children back in Stratford to walk to London and try to become a rich and famous playwright.

With the luxury of history, we know that worked out. But Davidson’s Shakespeare doesn’t have that information yet, so instead, we see him as a handsome young hunk with huge blue eyes and two immediate dramas, one very promising and the other very dire.

On the dire side, he’s carrying a letter and rosary beads that mark him as a Catholic.

That’s a problem because, in 1589 England, the ruling hierarchy wanted to hunt down and kill every Catholic it could find. In the first episode, we see two graphic and gruesome examples of the extreme methods by which this was done.

Will’s letter is pilfered by a hustling street urchin, who sees it as information he could trade to get his sister out of prostitution.

Better news for Shakespeare is that within 48 hours of arriving in London, he has sold a play to one of the most popular theater companies in London, which will produce it the next night.

Don’t ask.

He’s also met a beautiful girl, Alice Burbage (Olivia De Jonge), who is the daughter of the theater company owner James Burbage (Colm Meaney) and is instantly smitten with this dreamy newcomer.

To his credit, Will only indulges in one long drunken kiss with Alice before he tells her he’s married. Points to Will for honesty. Points to the writers for accelerating the flowering of the show’s inner soap opera.

Unattainable romance. A sure winner.

And did we mention that Will runs into Christopher Marlowe (Jamie Campbell Bower), already an established playwright and also a young hunk?

Marlowe could ruin him and chooses not to, instead seeing in Will a potential party pal.

When it’s not tracking Shakespeare’s instant good fortune or appalling viewers with the religious warfare of the time, Will includes an actors’ showdown that resembles a battle between rap MCs and some allusion from Alice to the repression of women and the need for personal freedom.

As this might suggest, Will often feels like a millennial drama dropped into 16th century London. It takes a casual attitude toward history and uses the fact we know relatively little about Shakespeare’s early day-to-day life to imagine that life unfolded in a style that would be right at home on, say, the CW.

At times, in fact, the CW’s Reign comes to mind here, as does the Starz series Da Vinci’s Demons.

It’s not a dealbreaker of an idea to take a famous historical figure and put him or her into a world that makes his or her life more relatable to young folks who come along several centuries later.

It works better, though, if the modern trappings flavor the historic character, rather than the other way around.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogP...x?postId=14332
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TV/Critic's Notes (Cable)
The Best Actor on TV Is Better Call Saul’s Michael McKean
By Jen Chaney, Vulture.com (New York Magazine)

Vulture’s fourth annual TV Awards honor the best in television from the past year in three major categories: Show, Actor, and Actress. The shows that were considered had to be ongoing, which disqualifies limited series and series that ended their runs in the past year. They also must have premiered before June 25, 2017.

Michael McKean’s portrayal of the complicated, maddening, ultimately tragic Chuck McGill on Better Call Saul is outstanding on its own merits. But when one considers that McKean is primarily known for his work in comedy — as, among others, gentle, greasy goofball Lenny Kosnowski on Laverne & Shirley and frustrated aging rocker David St. Hubbins in This Is Spinal Tap — his transformation into Chuck rises to another level. On Better Call Saul, a man we primarily associate with laughter fully transforms into a control freak with a broken mind who is as allergic to humor as he (allegedly) is to electromagnetism. Despite the fact that he has tackled dramatic material before, you may still think of McKean as the guy who hung out with Squiggy or sang “Big Bottom.” But while watching him on Better Call Saul, all you see is Chuck: intelligent, deadly serious, stubborn, miserable Chuck.

Given his dogged commitment to obstructing the life and career of his equally flawed brother, Jimmy (Bob Odenkirk), Chuck McGill may be perceived by some as a villain. McKean does nothing to soften the guy’s edges. He cloaks Chuck in an air of superiority that’s thicker than any space blanket he uses to insulate himself from perceived danger. That sense of entitlement informs the choices, large and subtle, that McKean makes as an actor, from the formal, legal-document-ready manner in which he speaks to the way he can infuse any glance with toxic condescension, especially when that glance is directed at Jimmy.

Ultimately, though, Chuck can’t be reduced to the role of bad guy because Better Call Saul constantly reminds us that there is another side to him. This is a man suffering from a mental illness that has upended his life, derailed his legal career, largely cut him off from the world, and literally, thanks to his aversion to light, cast his days in dark shadow. In every scene in which Chuck’s electricity allergy flares up, McKean displays the symptoms of Chuck’s agony with heartbreaking precision, via the twitching of his hands, the winces that distort his facial features, and the panic in his eyes that erases all traces of his self-assured smugness. Another actor might lean too hard into this type of physicality and render it silly or unbelievable. But McKean’s manifestation of Chuck’s symptoms never comes across as anything other than totally real, even if the cause of those symptoms may be an aberration. When Chuck becomes wildly uncomfortable in his body, he’s also trying to fight that feeling, and McKean consistently displays that tug-of-war between terror and Chuck’s need to maintain order and justice, even within the context of his own panic attacks.

That’s what’s so important and meaningful about this performance: It reveals the intensity of the struggle behind mental illness and how easy it can be, for a while anyway, to hide that struggle from others. Chuck’s mind works so efficiently and he can seem so lucid that it is easy to forget that his internal wiring is faulty. Having a mental illness like the one Chuck has is a battle that can trick you into thinking you’re winning when you’re not. In his performance in season three of Better Call Saul, Michael McKean shows us what it looks and feels like to fight, and, ultimately, choose surrender.

The Case for Michael McKean

[CLICK LINK AT BOTTOM FOR CLIPS] Note: Spoilers about the Better Call Saul season-three finale will pop up in this section.

1. The Courtroom Showdown (Episode 305, “Chicanery”)
This lengthy scene is the highlight of Better Call Saul season three and McKean’s for-your-consideration moment.

In a hearing before the New Mexico Bar Association, Jimmy, acting in his own defense, tries to corner his brother, who is on the witness stand, into acknowledging that his electromagnetic allergies are not real. “He’s hoping this will split me down the seams like a murderer confessing on an episode of Perry Mason,” Chuck says of his brother’s inquiries. “Well” — and here McKean drags out the “well” so that it sounds like an exasperated, “I have no time for this” sigh — “I’m sorry to disappoint you, Jimmy.”

Chuck does eventually split down the seams. When the tear comes, McKean plays it like a sudden, explosive rupture.

Jimmy reveals that a cell-phone battery was secretly slipped into the breast pocket of Chuck’s blazer, putting all those electromagnetic waves in close proximity to his heart and head. Chuck launches into a tirade that lays bare his own instability and every ounce of resentment he feels toward his brother.

“He gets to be a lawyer?” Chuck shouts. “What a sick joke. I should have stopped him when I had the chance.” McKean totally cracks Chuck open here, his voice breaking on the word “stopped.” He only reins himself in when he sees the shocked looks on the faces of everyone in the courtroom. His expression droops; tears dot the corners of his eyes. “I apologize,” he says, trying to muster some dignity and reassert that superiority. But it’s too late. Chuck has lost, and he can’t hide that any longer. It’s an extraordinary transformation, and McKean commits to it with every cell in his body.

2. The Resignation (Episode 310, “Lantern”)
This is a small moment in an episode that gives Chuck some major ones, but it stands out because McKean, using no words, is so thoroughly able to convey Chuck’s humiliation and stunned sense of grief.

After giving Chuck a check for the $8 million share that he owns in Hamlin, Hamlin & McGill — a move that forces him out of the firm — Howard announces Chuck’s retirement at a firm-wide meeting, completely ambushing his now former partner.

Chuck is clearly shocked; he hadn’t imagined that Howard could or would pay out of pocket to get rid of him. It’s a sign of how far he’s fallen that $8 million seems like a reasonable price to pay for his erasure. Just before the announcement is made, Chuck’s face starts to crumble and it seems like he might even cry, but McKean quickly reorganizes his pieces and puts them back in place. As he walks down the stairs to exit the building while his colleagues applaud, a tennis volley of emotions take place across his face. In one moment, the weight of the situation visibly drags his cheeks down; in the next, he manages to lift them into a polite smile, until the weight creeps in again. You don’t realize it the first time you watch the episode, but on second viewing, it’s as stark as a freshly cut buyout check: This is the moment when Chuck starts to feel there’s little worth living for.

3. The Breakdown (Episode 310, “Lantern”)
Technically, this takes place over a series of scenes as Chuck tears his house apart in search of some unfindable source of power that’s causing him irritation. Again, McKean is doing wordless acting here. As he initially plunges his hands into drywall, feeling around for wires that he is sure are responsible for his suffering, he initially does so with such purpose you almost think he’s going to find a culprit. But by the last scene of the season, after he’s taken a baseball bat to his electricity meter, it’s obvious he’s just done. The lawyer who has argued cases, and argued with his brother, and argued internally with himself, has no fight left, and you can tell, because McKean completely drains his eyes of all life. As Chuck kicks that lantern and, in his last passive-aggressive act of self-destruction, waits for it to start a fire, McKean reveals what it looks like when a whip-smart man turns out his own lights.

Who He Beat

This is the part of this exercise that I hate because it exposes just how arbitrary the act of choosing a best anything is. Why isn’t the sensational Jeffrey Tambor from Transparent the one being recognized here? Or American Gods’s Ian McShane, or perennial Emmy nominee Kevin Spacey for House of Cards, or Donald Glover for Atlanta? All of these actors are deserving, and in a TV landscape like the current one, there are probably 30 more deserving ones that our readers could rattle off in a matter of seconds. Ultimately, I have to make a decision based on my gut, and the performance that seemed to require a special set of skills that no other performance quite demanded.

Just as the Television Critics’ Association does with its annual TV awards, I did not weed out what might be considered supporting performances and only focus on leads. I simply thought about the male performances that dug deepest and had the most impact. I would argue that, while Bob Odenkirk is unquestionably the star of Better Call Saul, McKean was so central to the show, especially in the third season, that his performance rose to lead level for me.

Why did McKean beat out his co-star, who is great and this season got to explore Jimmy at his most desperate and most blatantly unethical? Because ultimately, I thought McKean’s performance went to more challenging places than Odenkirk’s was pushed to go.

Then there’s perennial favorite Matthew Rhys of The Americans, who was, as ever, wonderfully understated and quietly conflicted as Philip Jennings. This was a less eventful season of The Americans than usual, though, and several of the episodes didn’t pack the same punch for me that they have in the past, even though the acting is still top-notch. That made me, regretfully, push Rhys to the side.

One of the most exciting actors to watch on TV right now is Kyle MacLachlan, who is playing multiple characters on Twin Peaks and clearly relishing every moment he spends hobbling around and discovering the world as Dougie. But because Twin Peaks is still in progress, I didn’t feel like I could analyze the full scope of his performance.

Sterling K. Brown did superb work throughout the entire first season of This Is Us, consistently elevating material that might have been overly sentimental in another actor’s hands. He’s easily the most complicated and interesting character on that show, at least at this stage, and I fully expect to see him nominated for an Emmy. But because This Is Us has a lighter touch than a show like Better Call Saul, Brown didn’t have to go to hell and back, then back again, the way McKean constantly did as Chuck.

I considered rewarding Anthony Anderson, who got to show some serious range on this season of Black-ish, particularly in episodes like “Lemons” and “Sprinkles.” But playing Dre didn’t require the kind of deep immersion that playing Chuck McGill demanded of Michael McKean.

Speaking of deep immersion, let’s talk about Justin Theroux, whose performance in the final season of The Leftovers required him to deeply immerse himself in water and come back to life more than once. He missed getting the award here by *that* much; I was especially moved by his work in the finale, which enabled him to show a different side of Kevin Garvey: what he looks like when he’s finally found some peace. It’s like he’s a whole other man, and in a way, he is; Kevin was reborn over and over on that show, and no matter how weird things got — and, oh, as evidenced by Kevin’s purgatory stint as president, they did get weird — Theroux responded to it all with an authenticity that kept The Leftovers grounded and believable when it easily could have soared off into the bizarro-sphere. Yet, as terrific as Theroux is, I couldn’t shake the sense that this season ultimately belonged more fully to Carrie Coon’s Nora, who I named the best actress on TV last year and who ranks right up there again this year. The final season of The Leftovers ultimately ends with an episode called “The Book of Nora,” and the detailed account of how that finale was made, written by our Boris Kachka, even notes that the first words on the writers’ room whiteboard for season three were: “Nora, Nora, Nora.” Nora emotionally owned the third season of The Leftovers more than Kevin did, in the same way that Chuck emotionally owned season three of Better Call Saul to a greater extent than Jimmy.

So, ultimately, I went with McKean. Yes, he may have benefited from the recency effect and the fact that his arc on Better Call Saul came to such a tragic end point right as we were making our Vulture TV Award decisions. But I also feel like McKean has been doing this sort of richly observant work for decades, but not necessarily getting recognition for it because that work usually falls on the comedy side of the spectrum. He’s the kind of actor we take for granted, and that made me want to — and, please, forgive the pun given Chuck McGill’s condition — shine a light on him.

McKean’s performance also resonated with me for personal reasons. For years, I cared for a close family member who suffered from mental-health issues but refused to get treatment or fully admit the extent of her problems. She didn’t think she was allergic to light or electromagnetic waves, but, like Chuck, she isolated herself, spent most days in dimly lit rooms, and relied on other people (namely me) to handle day-to-day tasks, like buying groceries and paying the bills. She could also be emotionally abusive when things weren’t handled exactly to her liking.

You feel for a person who’s like this because you know it’s the illness that’s causing it. But it’s also incredibly frustrating and psychologically draining to be around them. McKean’s performance captured all the nuance in that kind of behavior, including the slips into extended periods of clarity and the slides back into agitation and paranoia.

On television and in film, mental health is sometimes presented as a problem that can be solved with some effort, through talk therapy or meds or a hospital stay. Sometimes it can. But in his role as Chuck, McKean showed us what it looks to engage in a long, real, concerted fight with with a mind that’s betraying you. He revealed what a source of deep humiliation mental illness can be, especially for someone once considered an overachiever. He became a fictional character so real that he reminded me of a human being I once knew and loved, and still love. In short, he made Chuck McGill as recognizable to me as anyone I’ve ever known, and presumably he did that for others as well. And what more can you ask of a performance than that?

http://www.vulture.com/2017/06/vultu...call-saul.html
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)
From Zap2it.com's TV Grid - Jul. 10, 2017

ABC:
8PM - The Bachelorette (120 min.)
10PM - The Gong Show: Dana Carvey; Tracee Ellis Ross; Anthony Anderson
(R - Jul. 6)
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Kit Harington; Regina Hall; Trey Songz performs)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - Kevin Can Wait
(R - Oct. 31)
8:30PM - Man With a Plan
(R - Feb. 6)
9PM - Mom
(R - Feb. 16)
9:30PM - Life in Pieces
(R - Nov. 3)
10PM - Scorpion
(R - Jan. 23)
* * *
11:35PM - The Late Show With Stephen Colbert (Woody Harrelson; Cobie Smulders; Emmylou Harris and Her Red Dirt Boys perform)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show With James Corden (Claire Danes; Christine Baranski; Jack McBrayer; Zara Larsson performs)
(R - Apr. 4)

NBC:
8PM - American Ninja Warrior (120 min.)
10PM - Spartan: Ultimate Team Challenge
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Gal Gadot; Barry Manilow performs)
(R - May 23)
12:37AM - Late Night with Seth Meyers (Playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda; Jason Mantzoukas; lifestyle expert Martha Stewart; Sam Fogarino sits in with the 8G Band)
(R - Jun. 29)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly
(R)

FOX:
8PM - So You Think You Can Dance
9PM - Superhuman

THE CW:
8PM - Supergirl
(R - Nov. 21)
9PM - Whose Line Is It Anyway?: Wil Wheaton
9:30PM - Whose Line Is It Anyway? The Bella Twins
(R - Jun. 5)

PBS:
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Vintage Cleveland
9PM - Antiques Roadshow: Vintage Rochester
(R - Jul. 8, 2013)
10PM - POV: Last Men in Aleppo (90 min.)

UNIVISION:
8PM - José de Egipto
9PM - La Doble Vida de Estela Carrillo
10PM - Rosario Tijeras

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Jenni Rivera: Mariposa de Barrio
9PM - La Querida del Centauro
10PM - El Señor de Los Cielos

BRAVO:
8PM - Southern Charm
9PM - The Real Housewives of Orange County (Season Premiere)
10PM - Sweet Home Oklahoma
10:30PM - Sweet Home Oklahoma

ESPN/ESPN 2:
8PM - 2017 Home Run Derby (120 min.)

FOOD NETWORK:
8PM - Dessert Games (Series Premiere)
9PM - Texas Cake House
9:30PM - Texas Cake House
10PM - Incredible Edible America (Season Finale)

USA:
8PM - WWE Monday Night RAW (3 hrs. 5 min., LIVE)

AMC:
9PM - Preacher (63 min.)

HBO:
9PM - The Defiant Ones: Part 2 (70 min.)

TNT:
9PM - Will (Series Premiere, 68 min.)
10:08PM - Will

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Trevor Noah (Comic Kumail Nanjiani)
11:31PM - At Midnight with Chris Hardwick (Moshe Kasher; Natasha Leggero; Rory Scovel)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Snoop Dogg; Flula Borg; Mastodon performs)


http://tvlistings.zap2it.com/tvlisti...000&aid=zap2it
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post #17422 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 09:16 AM
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TV/Critic's Notes (Cable)
The Best Show on TV Is Twin Peaks: The Return
By Matt Zoller Seitz, Vulture.com - Jul. 5, 2017

No.
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post #17423 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 09:48 AM
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It's an AP story, so click the link for more:

'Walking Dead' voiceover actor dies in skydiving accident

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment...-accident.html

I really ought to act more like a woman of my advancing years, but I’m growing old disgracefully.
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post #17424 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 10:08 AM
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No.
Yes, it's by far the most creative series on TV. You have been "Lynched".

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post #17425 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 10:17 AM
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Yes, it's by far the most creative series on TV. You have been "Lynched".

No.

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post #17426 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 10:25 AM
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Have you even seen an episode? Some people just can't handle it. Nobody does surrealism better than David Lynch. His work will be studied and imitated for many years to come.

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post #17427 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 11:56 AM
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Have you even seen an episode?

Yes


Quote:
Some people just can't handle it.

Yes.
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post #17428 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 01:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Nielsen Overnights (Broadcast)
‘Candy Crush’ Has OK Premiere Ratings As ‘Big Brother’ Rises, ‘Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly’ Steady-ish
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Jul. 10, 2017

CBS and ABC went toe-to-toe Sunday, finishing the night tied for first place in adults 18-49.

CBS was fueled by summer staple Big Brother (1.8 rating in 18-49, 6.49 million viewers), which grew 29% in the demo and 26% from its Sunday season premiere the previous week, logging Week 2 improvements on all three nights. It was the top program of the night in the demo. At 9 PM, CBS took on ABC’s game show block with new entry Candy Crush (1.1, 4.13 million). In its debut, the series based on the popular mobile game held on to a so-so 61% of its Big Brother demo lead-in and was below the premiere in the time slot of ABC’s Funderdome last month, but it won its time slot in the demo, topping the Steve Harvey-fronted Funderdome (0.9, 4.63 million).

Facing original competition on CBS from 8-10 PM, the entire ABC lineup was off from their previous originals two weeks ago. Celebrity Family Feud (1.3) slipped by 0.1, Steve Harvey’s Funderdome by 0.2 and The $100,000 Pyramid (0.9) by 0.2.

NBC’s underwhelming Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly stemmed its steady ratings decline with its first week-to-week hold in 18-49 (0.4) while continuing to slip in total viewers to a new low of 3.2 million. It easily was topped in the 7 PM hour by CBS’ veteran 60 Minutes (0.7, 7.2 million).

Fox’s American Grit (0.4) also was even in the demo.

http://deadline.com/2017/07/candy-cr...ds-1202125948/
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post #17429 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 01:41 PM - Thread Starter
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Technology/Business Notes
Jawbone, out of business, leaves customers hanging
By Jefferson Graham, USA Today - Jul. 10, 2017

LOS ANGELES — Tech products have gone out of business before, but they usually leave traces for consumer contact.

The fitness tracker and bluetooth speaker company Jawbone, which is in the process of liquidating, is taking a different tack.

Visitors to its website see a company that looks like all is well, and is promoting products—except that there are no links to buy them. A phone number contact directs callers to a general voicemail box. Customers complain in online review forums of leaving many messages in e-mail and phone form that haven't been answered.

How Jawbone is handling it “isn’t responsible,” says Gartner analyst Angela McIntyre.

A Jawbone spokesperson had no comment.

Last week, tech industry website The Information reported on the liquidation proceedings, saying that co-founder and CEO Hosain Rahman is starting a new company to make health-related hardware and software services.

The demise followed years of reports the San Francisco start-up, once valued at $3 billion and the beneficiary of $950 million in venture capital funding, according to Pitchbook, was on shaky ground. Jawbone had been locked in a heated battle with Fitbit for the wearable market, with products that help you count daily steps and track sleep.

But Fitbit has been way ahead. In 2016, Fitbit shipped 22.3 million devices, and McIntyre guesses Jawbone saw “less than 20% of that.” Gartner estimates 34.7 million fitness trackers were sold last year, including from companies like Garmin and Samsung.

Unlike Jawbone, the makers of past tech fizzles did reach out to their customers.

Pebble Watch, for instance, which stopped making new watches in 2016, and has since seen some of its assets acquired by Fitbit, has a webpage alerting consumers what to do, and how to apply for refunds if they're Kickstarter backers.

In late 2016 the Lily Camera, a drone that promised simple flight operations and had booked over $30 million in pre-orders, shut its doors and promised refunds to backers. The Lily website is down, but Lily has a Facebook page with links for filing refunds.

Other recent missteps include Amazon’s Fire phone, which went bust and the Samsung Note 7, which was recalled. Both were by big companies that stayed around, with processes to contact the company, and in Samsung's case, get a refund or a new phone.

The Information says Jawbone founders' new firm will take care of customer service. Jawbone has just yet to show any sign of that yet.

Jan Dawson, an analyst with Jackdaw Research, says consumers should think long and hard before buying products, and really research the company.

“Stories about Jawbone having troubles have been out there for the last year and a half,” he says. “The writing has been on the wall if you cared to look.”

While Jawbone's existing customers seem out of luck, Jawbone's competitors may gain some advantage.

Julie Ask, an analyst with Forrester Research, says the wearable market is a tough nut to crack for small companies, and she sees upsides by the established players like Apple and Samsung, who “have the scale to produce and distribute hardware plus they have the services element.”

https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/...ing/461159001/
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post #17430 of 33037 Old 07-10-2017, 01:46 PM - Thread Starter
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Nielsen Overnights (Cable)
TV Viewers Like ‘The Eighties’ More Than ‘The Nineties’ on CNN
By Brian Flood, TheWrap.com - Jul. 10, 2017

The nineties ushered in the grunge era, “Pulp Fiction” and “Friends” — but, as it turns out, viewers are more interested in the decade that introduced Pac-Man and “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.”

Cable news viewers among the key demo of adults age 25-54 prefer the ’80s over the ’90s, at least according to the ratings of CNN’s latest original series ‘The Nineties.”

The debut of “The Nineties” averaged 506,000 demo viewers on Sunday night, finishing as the most-watched show among cable news. During the 9-11 p.m. ET timeslot, CNN’s look at television in the ’90s beat Fox News by 82 percent and MSNBC by 315 percent.

However, the series opener couldn’t beat last year’s version, “The Eighties,” which averaged 598,000 demo viewers for its premiere. Still, “The Nineties” easily surpassed “The Seventies,” which averaged 291,000 in the demo and “The Sixties,” which averaged 284,000.

http://www.thewrap.com/cnns-the-nine...-the-eighties/
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