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post #1 of 24 Old 01-09-2018, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
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Why centralized video with whole house distribution?

In my series of newbie to the field questions that hopefully haven't been asked ad naseum (I did search and read through some older threads)...

Trying to wrap my head around a centralized/distributed TV/video setup and having a hard time even listing all the benefits and compromises, let alone sort and weigh them.

Lighting systems I understand the need, only have to decide which vendor/route to go.

Security, same.

Whole house audio, need is obvious, only have to decide Sonos type or hardwired with centralized controller/amps (probably).

But video? Not sure why but it isn't as obvious to me as audio, or maybe I'm just more afraid about complexity or unsure of future compatibility concerns.

Could someone help by telling me why in their system it is either a must have, super convenient or super slick feature? I used to think it would be awesome to do this so that you could watch something DVR on one TV anywhere else in the house. Then came along the Hopper et al. My cSpire fiber service allows this. I thought it might save money by paying for fewer cable/dish/whatever boxes, only having maybe three could be watched anywhere instead of one on each of six or eight TV's. But cSpire now offers service via Amazon FireSticks... put one on each TV and pay for how many concurrent streams you want to be able to watch at one time. Centralizing movies might be nice so that any TV could watch any DVD or BluRay disc. But with Kodi, Plex, or even many automation systems/softwares and a central server/NAS that doesn't seem necessary either. I've had Kodi on a few Intel Nucs and an unRaid server a few years now and works great. I suppose it does clean up the look of each room, though I guess locating equipment in a nearby closet with RF remotes is possible too with a little thought up front.

Are there capabilities beyond that I haven't considered or haven't considered enough? Is that necessary to be able to see who is at the door from any TV? Is there some benefit to having a video stream available on touchscreen keypads, or tablet devices? What else that isn't obvious to me?

On the cons side, I know HDbaseT can be finicky. Need to plan for remote control signal. May require two cat runs to carry 4k. Guessing the hardware cost isn't trivial? What about future compatibility? Would this in any way limit or conversely facilitate upgrades to disc players, streaming devices, cable/fiber service etc?

Appreciate any thoughts. While I know this can be done and look nice, its really the only part of the whole home automation and A/V distribution arena that I'm still trying to figure out whether I even need or want to do it.

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post #2 of 24 Old 01-09-2018, 02:01 PM
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I have a IP Video Distribution system by Video Storm called Netplay. They have both a Custom Install product AND a DIY product. the DIY product can be tied into various DIY control systems as well and has like 80-90% of the core features of the Pro version (the pro/CI version has some business focused stuff for retail/restaurant applications that have been stripped). I believe from your past posts you are going DIY so this is something to consider.

Every use case is different. I have a house with 8 tvs and only 2 people live there (wife and I). so we are never watching more than 2 streams/cable channels at once. So I did not want to invest in TiVo or a service with mini boxes or pay to rent mini boxes per TV. So I centralized 2 boxes and distribute via the matrix.

We also centralized the 1 Blu Ray player. so yes we have to go downstairs to use it, but honestly, in 4 years with the system we've used it less than 4 times. We mostly stream stuff (will get to that) or we have a NAS with 100's of movies and we stream from our own collection.

Due to cost, I have an amazon fire tv or stick at each location.

The Video Distribution system allows for IP Cameras to be a source, so if I hear a noise outside I can go watch > {Insert camera name} and I'll see the camera on the TV. If my alarm is triggered between 10pm and 8am (used that time because that is usually when we are in bed) the master bedroom TV turns on and I get a 2x3 screen on the TV showing my 6 cameras so its like a mini command center and its all automated. Lastly with cameras, yes when someone rings the door I'll get a PiP for about 10 seconds showing a live feed of the camera by the door. The video distribution system I have also has an instance of Kodi built into each decoder, so at every tv I have Kodi right there (though I have a fire stick and could side load too).

as I do 2x3 with my cameras for security you can do the same in any combination for any sources. If you had 4 cable boxes you could have a 2x2 grid and watch 4 sporting events at once :-)

Mini pro but the decoder at each TV also carries RS232 and IR control helping with my automation system and making wiring and schematics easier.

My wife liked the fact that we did not have boxes everywhere. Some tvs are wall mounted, others are not, but its just a cleaner look without boxes.

It is also nice to be able to have different zones sharing sources other than just the cable boxes. There are times I played a movie off the NAS in multiple rooms. I also have Video Storm's audio matrix so I can feed TV Audio into other rooms and we use this at some parties such as our Super Bowl party. I can pipe the TV audio feed of the game into other rooms that may have speakers but no tv (bathrooms, etc).

It is certainly not a requirement with the way streaming services are coming along, but if you are going to stream tv shows and large movie files you really need to throw $$ at a really solid and reliable network. hardwire where possible!

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post #3 of 24 Old 01-09-2018, 06:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Cool, thanks for the detailed response. Trying to figure out how much of that I can or can't do without a centralized system. I'll be pulling multiple cat6a and some coax to every TV location, and will invest in quality router and switches, so its really just a matter of whether I put an Intel nuc or other streaming device or perhaps multiple devices at each TV pulling data from unraid and/or automation controller over cat, or centralize the hardware and push the video stream over cat to each TV.

I'll go read some about video storm. That wwould probably help, because while a lot of automation software/systems both DIY and dealer installed have video distribution capabilities its hard to find a lot of information on their sites about how it works.

Would be interested to know a little more about an instance of kodi built into each decoder. Do you mean the video storm hardware?
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post #4 of 24 Old 01-09-2018, 08:37 PM
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So there's really two different concepts here that both share the same wiring infrastructure - and regardless of the usage of either, I'd still recommend enough pre-wiring to be able to support them, if only in the future...

First, there is "centralized" - locating all the gear necessary for an AV zone in a central location. This has been done mostly for aesthetics - keeping all the gear out of sight, especially with nice flat panels mounted on walls. Then there is "Distributed", which is sharing expensive or unique (security DVRs for example) sources among multiple zones. Of course most centralized systems will do some amount of source sharing, but it's not a requirement.

Now, over the last decade, as you've pointed out, a lot has changed. Whole-house DVRs are common, and media streamer clients for both Internet and personal libraries and cheap and plentiful. Client devices are either now integrated into the displays, or are small enough to tuck behind the unit out of sight. High quality soundbars can take the place of remotely-located AVR setups.

On the flip side, the move to digital (HDMI) created a number of problems that require care to avoid or fix. Mis-matches in AV capabilities among displays creates all sorts of issues. 1080p and DD/DTS is reasonably easy to distribute these days. But of course, now we're wanting DTS-MA, Atmos, and 4K / HDR. Which will start the problem list all over again...

There are some use cases that are still best implemented with a distributed video system. The most frequent case is the need or desire to replicate a source to multiple displays in sync with each other.

The good news is that for modern systems, the wiring pattern is the same (good amounts of category cable to lots of places), and that wiring is useful for tons of other uses other than remote or distributed video.

So the answer for you is to see if there's a use case that requires either of those types of systems (in some or all locations) and go from there. A lot of folks coming here will start with "I need an HDMI matrix" and we talk them down to just using a TiVo Bolt/Mini setup and avoid all the hassle (for example). And folks trying to avoid the set-top box rental fees don't always do the math - a distributed video system may cost more than several years of rental fees - and that assumes you don't change providers or move in the meantime...

Hope that helps!

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post #5 of 24 Old 01-09-2018, 09:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes, that helps.

Did a little more reading about the c-spire pay per stream option (currently I have a pay per box service using little amino set top boxes, all that was offered when I signed up). Apparently its just a c-spire app that gives full access to menu, dvr functions (hard drive centralized to hardware at fiber point of entry, same as for amino boxes), all your channels. ie, TV works just like it does for me now... but the app runs on amazon fire TV, nvidia shield, apple TV, later generation android and apple phones and tablets. Really changes my perspective a bit on how TV works! Since that is pay per concurrent streams its no difference whether distributed or not. Just swapping one type of hardware (streaming boxes) for another (conversion boxes, matrix switches etc.).

You're right, I need to think hard about use cases. That was the main reason for starting this thread as I'm simply not aware of many of them I'm sure. And in particular, which use cases absolutely require a distributed system to implement.

Thanks for the clarification on centralized vs distributed btw. Those terms aren't exactly intuitive the way they are used but guess its a matter of perspective... centralizing hardware vs distributing signal from central location. That clarification will help as I keep reading.

Oh, and is it possible or ever useful to do a hybrid system? Say, streaming box on each TV that can run TV app, Netflix, maybe kodi etc, and a distributed system pushing a feed from one of those unique or expensive sources like security nvr, automation system notification/info, etc.? I guess the problem might be switching physical sources on the TV or difficulty achieving overlay of sources like door camera PIP and such?
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post #6 of 24 Old 01-10-2018, 05:33 AM
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To answer your Kodi question - I can only speak to the Netplay pro lineup. The VTX are used as encoders, ie your cable box, streaming box, blu ray, etc hook into a VTX via hdmi. then you have a decoder, the VRX020 is the latest model. those go behind the tv, accept the ethernet cable and then have an HDMI out (as well as RS232, IR, etc). each VRX020 runs an instance of Kodi, so at any TV where you have a VRX you also have Kodi

Using Netplay Home which is the DIY lineup you are not using a VRX. That being said, you CAN use an Amazon Fire TV since it is a bring your own hardware system and AFT is supported. And you can side load kodi onto an Amazon Fire TV/Stick, so...so yeah, either way you can get kodi at each location.

The use case for centralized video can be different for different people. I like ours and if I rebuilt a house today I'd likely utilize it again. It was very easy when I changed from 1 cable provider to another, just swapped 2 boxes in 1 location and the service guy was out in 10 mins. I did not have to take down tvs, remove small boxes fastened behind tvs, wire them up, etc. And again for 2 people with several tvs it did not make sense to be renting so many boxes making clutter, more wires, etc. So for us, its worthwhile. The ability to use the cameras on the screen, kodi, multi wall/tiling, etc are all just icing on the cake.
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post #7 of 24 Old 01-10-2018, 06:20 AM - Thread Starter
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Did some browsing of the netplay stuff last night. Looks like a pretty slick system, like that kodi can be integrated pretty easily. The biggest negative I see is that it is 1080p, which is fine for TV and most movies over kodi but prohibits 4k bluray in locations where I might want that (which other than the theater, which will almost certainly have local hardware, includes the family TV room, kids play/gameroom and master bedroom). And presumably then doesn't support HDR. Which highlights to me that the distribution system locks in video capabilities. That could be a 10 year lifespan, which isn't bad though. More reading to do!
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post #8 of 24 Old 01-10-2018, 08:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigus View Post
Did some browsing of the netplay stuff last night. Looks like a pretty slick system, like that kodi can be integrated pretty easily. The biggest negative I see is that it is 1080p, which is fine for TV and most movies over kodi but prohibits 4k bluray in locations where I might want that (which other than the theater, which will almost certainly have local hardware, includes the family TV room, kids play/gameroom and master bedroom). And presumably then doesn't support HDR. Which highlights to me that the distribution system locks in video capabilities. That could be a 10 year lifespan, which isn't bad though. More reading to do!
Netplay Home is Bring your own hardware. It is 4k compliant if your hardware is 4k compliant. You can upgrade hardware ongoing as you see fit.
http://www.c4forums.com/topic/23198-...quipment-list/
The original post is almost a year old but scroll down from that same post they list 4k compliant devices you can buy:

"New for XMAS 17:

New 4K HDMI encoders:
U-RAY 4K HDMI encoders based on the latest HiSilicon chipset
Supports all the necessary features for NetPlay (Tiling, RTSP, multicast, etc)
~$370 shipped
Order link on Ali Express LINK

New 4K decoders:
New Ultra HD Amazon Fire TVs
Faster, more 4K and HDR than before
Fully compatible with NetPlay TV
only $69!
Add a OTG adapter and wired Ethernet hub for around $15 OTG adapter Ethernet usb hub

Remember there are no NetPlay TV upgrade costs when switching to newer decoder hardware!
4K encoders can send 4K to 4K decoders and 1080p to 1080p decoders at the same time. We don't force you to upgrade your older hardware!"
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post #9 of 24 Old 01-10-2018, 01:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Well that certainly makes it more attractive. I overlooked that... was probably reading about the netplay pro capabilities with the VRX.
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post #10 of 24 Old 01-10-2018, 01:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigus View Post
Thanks for the clarification on centralized vs distributed btw. Those terms aren't exactly intuitive the way they are used but guess its a matter of perspective... centralizing hardware vs distributing signal from central location. That clarification will help as I keep reading.
Just note that there's probably not a universal agreement on those definitions... :d

Quote:
Oh, and is it possible or ever useful to do a hybrid system? Say, streaming box on each TV that can run TV app, Netflix, maybe kodi etc, and a distributed system pushing a feed from one of those unique or expensive sources like security nvr, automation system notification/info, etc.? I guess the problem might be switching physical sources on the TV or difficulty achieving overlay of sources like door camera PIP and such?
Absolutely! Lots of reasons to have some local sources in some zones for convenience or superior AV capabilities - e.g. local 4K bluray in a theater room while distribution to the rest of house is 1080p-only. Game consoles and blu-ray players are commonly placed in individual zones as you need to have the controllers in range, and going across the house to insert a disc is not optimal.

In my own setup, I have local blu-ray players in the theater and the living room, and the streamers and game consoles are there, too. I distribute the CATV/DTV signals, as well as "house feed" blu-ray player. This makes sense for my usage - I only need two set-top boxes but have ~10 displays. And my system is 9 years old so pre-dates some of the whole-house DVR capabilities. Looking forward I'll likely put local 4K sources in my theater and living room, but keep the distributed video for the rest of the house, and for those times when I want all the zones in sync (Super Bowl party, etc.).

With the streamer boxes being so cheap, it's also not worth tying up space on a distributed system for $50 source, when you could just tuck one in each zone and actually have more capabilities.

Jeff

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post #11 of 24 Old 01-10-2018, 01:46 PM - Thread Starter
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Makes sense. Seems highly likely I will swap to the c-spire app method of service requiring me to put an amazon fire TV 4k at each display. That would work for access to streaming apps at each location. I guess it also sets me up for the netplay if I decide to go that route.
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post #12 of 24 Old 01-11-2018, 05:41 AM
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netplay video storm folks are very helpful. to me their marketing material leaves a little to be desired but I've had Netplay pro (home was not available at the time) for 3 years and it has been flawless. they have great email support too and can you walk you through whats needed to get set up.
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post #13 of 24 Old 02-07-2018, 04:08 PM
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My system isnt quite as sophisticated as exlotogura's but has the benefits of simplicity, low cost and great flexibility.

ingredients;
4x4 HDMI matrix from monoprice - about $150
2 redmere active HDMI cables 100' & 50' - about $150 total
Irule builder app for android/IOS - <$100 I think, one time cost
misc global cache IR devices - again about $150

I run 1 hdmi cable to each TV (along with one 3.5mm cable for IR, although you could use wireless, I prefer hardwire usually) all home run to my media cabinet. In the cabinet I have my cable box, blu-ray, roku, nintendo.
I used irule software to build a remote control app that runs everything from any andriod/IOS device. You choose the room your in, then your source and it uses the GC IR devices to start up everything in the proper location. The media cabinet also holds my router/rasberry PI, this way everything plugs in via cat 5 to the router (avoiding wireless there also)

This way I just pay for one cable box, and I get the clean look of just a TV hanging on the wall by itself, no wires or boxes. The active HDMI cables work GREAT, I believe they can do 4k also, no converters or anything, just plug it in like you would a 6'. If I decide to change internet company I can just drop in a new STB/router in the cabinet.

I dont use 4k but pretty sure you could use the above setup for 4k. Its very simple and robust. running the cable is a pain but I love the simplicity of not having to run converters (cat5-hdmi or some such)

The irule software is flexible enough to handle my zwave lighting as well, although honestly I dont use it as much as I thought I would, the coolness wears off quickly.

My 2c.
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post #14 of 24 Old 02-21-2018, 09:51 AM
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I'm in a similar situation and have looked at NetPlay Home. Just trying to understand for those who have used it, is it only used for physical sources? I understand that you have to have an Amazon Fire TV or similar connected to each display. But if you're watching a streaming app (Netflix, Hulu, etc) or Kodi, you're just using the Amazon Fire TV app and then when you want to watch a BluRay or STB, you open the separate NetPlay app? You're not watching streaming inside of the NetPlay app, correct?
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post #15 of 24 Old 05-27-2020, 07:18 PM
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Although the last post in this string is from 2018, this question is even more useful today. If you have a very strong network with Access Points where you need them for saturation coverage, and hardwired access for every TV, why do you need anything other than cable or satellite feed from your AV closet? You can accomplish that with DirecTV Genie system and Tivo Bolt and Minis, and some cable companies have their own whole house solutions. Even more pertinent, if every TV is a smart TV with streaming apps built in, why do you need anything but the TV and strong network?

I am remodeling and putting in a full Unifi Network with UniFi UAP-AC_IW Pro US and will send everything out from a central closet. With Lutron light switches and a Lutron bridge, I can handle lights, shade, thermostats, security cameras, and doorbells with phone or Alexa devices for voice control.

That only leaves whole house audio and whole house video. I don't think I need Crestron, or Savant, or Control4 to handle the audio, and I don't see the need for the video at all, for the reasons mentioned above.

I am hoping to get some new responses to this or a pointer to another relevant thread.
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post #16 of 24 Old 05-29-2020, 11:41 PM
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Maybe because not everyone streams? We only stream sometimes, and use dish. Not sure about genie, but the costs related to hopper adds up quickly. at least 25% of my bill is related to the devices and dvrs. I stream during football season, my wife streams when watching our great niece. Outside of that I would say we might stream 10% of the rest of the time. But she hates all the clutter related to all the devices in use. and at least 2 tvs locations don't have av storage space that is why I am interested in this topic.

Like you this thread is a bit old, but it caught my attention as I try to find a reasonable quality solution for my home. I already have mostly cat6 strung about the house, previous home owner ran some and I add some additional when we moved in.
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post #17 of 24 Old 05-31-2020, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingjnod View Post
Although the last post in this string is from 2018, this question is even more useful today. If you have a very strong network with Access Points where you need them for saturation coverage, and hardwired access for every TV, why do you need anything other than cable or satellite feed from your AV closet? You can accomplish that with DirecTV Genie system and Tivo Bolt and Minis, and some cable companies have their own whole house solutions. Even more pertinent, if every TV is a smart TV with streaming apps built in, why do you need anything but the TV and strong network?

I am remodeling and putting in a full Unifi Network with UniFi UAP-AC_IW Pro US and will send everything out from a central closet. With Lutron light switches and a Lutron bridge, I can handle lights, shade, thermostats, security cameras, and doorbells with phone or Alexa devices for voice control.

That only leaves whole house audio and whole house video. I don't think I need Crestron, or Savant, or Control4 to handle the audio, and I don't see the need for the video at all, for the reasons mentioned above.

I am hoping to get some new responses to this or a pointer to another relevant thread.
There are several advantages of a centralized system. Whether they matter to you I cannot say. A few are:

- No need for local video equipment in any zone. This can be a very big deal. A lot of people love to see nothing but a TV on the wall, and not have every room dominated by furniture just because of a TV in the room. Yes, some devices can be hidden behind TVs, so YMMV.

- Very easy to instantly send the same sources to multiple televisions. If I'm watching a movie in the theater I can instantly send that movie to the TV on in the kitchen and theater bath. If I want to go to the kitchen for a treat or need to make a bathroom trip, I'll find the same movie playing in those rooms. I don't miss any of the movie and don't need to pause it and interrupt it for the rest of the family. Ditto for other family members.

- The above scenario is just as common for media rooms. If you're having a super bowl party you turn on the game and with one button press can route it to other televisions.

- Easy to route CCTV cameras to any/all TV's.

- It's much easier to send central video sources into an audio matrix, so the video in all rooms plays through the (much better) in-wall or in-ceiling speakers in the room.

- For a very high end video source such as a 5K Kaleidescape movie server, that centralized source can be sent to every TV in the house. If you have 5 TVs in the house that would be 25K to have a movie server for each TV. So in that scenario the cost of the video distribution paid for itself.

Those are a few of the reasons...

Last edited by David Haddad; 05-31-2020 at 12:28 AM.
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post #18 of 24 Old 05-31-2020, 02:45 AM
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I use PVI modulators to send 1080 video to several TV's in a large house: all the modulators have Ethernet GUI so it is easy to set them up: ideal for an older home without Ethernet runs to every room: this works for cable boxes, surveillance, streaming boxes etc

each room has an RTI remote: the remote sends RF signals back to the equipment room to control the source, and IR to control local TV volume

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post #19 of 24 Old 06-09-2020, 01:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingjnod View Post
Although the last post in this string is from 2018, this question is even more useful today. If you have a very strong network with Access Points where you need them for saturation coverage, and hardwired access for every TV, why do you need anything other than cable or satellite feed from your AV closet? You can accomplish that with DirecTV Genie system and Tivo Bolt and Minis, and some cable companies have their own whole house solutions. Even more pertinent, if every TV is a smart TV with streaming apps built in, why do you need anything but the TV and strong network?

I am remodeling and putting in a full Unifi Network with UniFi UAP-AC_IW Pro US and will send everything out from a central closet. With Lutron light switches and a Lutron bridge, I can handle lights, shade, thermostats, security cameras, and doorbells with phone or Alexa devices for voice control.

That only leaves whole house audio and whole house video. I don't think I need Crestron, or Savant, or Control4 to handle the audio, and I don't see the need for the video at all, for the reasons mentioned above.

I am hoping to get some new responses to this or a pointer to another relevant thread.

How many displays do you have? How many sources do you have? How many people stay in the house on a regular basis?

The three most important questions I need to get answers on before I recommend video distribution to anyone. If you only have a handful of displays, and a handful of sources, then more than likely you don't need distribution. But if you've got a dozen displays serving a house of 5 or 6, with nearly 10 sources, then video distribution makes good sense.

However, for example, in my own home I have 9 sources (5 Comcast boxes, Roku, Tivo, Kaleidescape, Oppo BR Player), 10 displays and anywhere from 5 to 6 people in the house at any given time. The last thing I would want is a Comcast box, Roku and K Player at each display. With video distribution, sources are available from any display in the house, which helps me maintain clean installs, and have extended functionality.

Now when it comes to the need for a control solution, some find it easier and more convenient to have a single App control everything. Lighting (both C4 and Lutron), Audio, Video, Thermostats, Security, Shades, etc. all in one, as opposed to an App for this and an App for that. So a C4 or Crestron would make more sense. However, if someone is only concerned with a few systems, then you may not need the robust nature of a complete automation system.
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post #20 of 24 Old 06-09-2020, 03:35 PM
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How many displays do you have? How many sources do you have? How many people stay in the house on a regular basis?

The three most important questions I need to get answers on before I recommend video distribution to anyone. If you only have a handful of displays, and a handful of sources, then more than likely you don't need distribution. But if you've got a dozen displays serving a house of 5 or 6, with nearly 10 sources, then video distribution makes good sense.

However, for example, in my own home I have 9 sources (5 Comcast boxes, Roku, Tivo, Kaleidescape, Oppo BR Player), 10 displays and anywhere from 5 to 6 people in the house at any given time. The last thing I would want is a Comcast box, Roku and K Player at each display. With video distribution, sources are available from any display in the house, which helps me maintain clean installs, and have extended functionality.

Now when it comes to the need for a control solution, some find it easier and more convenient to have a single App control everything. Lighting (both C4 and Lutron), Audio, Video, Thermostats, Security, Shades, etc. all in one, as opposed to an App for this and an App for that. So a C4 or Crestron would make more sense. However, if someone is only concerned with a few systems, then you may not need the robust nature of a complete automation system.
Thank you for that great answer. I really appreciate it. Since I wrote that question I have learned a lot more about system control vs. system automation, and I now am seeing the advantage of a control solution like a crestron, C4, Savant, etc.

I am remodeling a house for eventual sale, and being the "thrifty" person that I am, I want to prewire to make it smart-home ready, but not actually pick a system for the next owner. My question is that I don't want to wire CrestNet cables if I don't have to. Can Cat 5e or Cat6 be used instead of CrestNet wiring?
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post #21 of 24 Old 06-09-2020, 08:12 PM
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If you were putting in a Crestron system, then you would be hiring a dealer to prewire Crestnet.
If that's not in the plan, then yes, pre-wire 2 Cat6 to all TV spots, one to in wall / on wall tablet spots, all rooms for speakers, RG6 to TV spots, irrigation control wires, outdoor pool sauna control wires, etc. Lots of posts on prewiring plans.

But you should be putting together a list of functionality for each room, select a control system, that then helps pick the devices in each room and in the equipment rack, that hardware then dictates the proper wiring plan. That's the correct way to pre-wire.

Pulling wire here and there will be hit and miss but often a hit if executed thoughtfully.

Put an empty conduit tube in key media areas for future proofing.
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post #22 of 24 Old 06-09-2020, 09:31 PM
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If you were putting in a Crestron system, then you would be hiring a dealer to prewire Crestnet.
If that's not in the plan, then yes, pre-wire 2 Cat6 to all TV spots, one to in wall / on wall tablet spots, all rooms for speakers, RG6 to TV spots, irrigation control wires, outdoor pool sauna control wires, etc. Lots of posts on prewiring plans.

But you should be putting together a list of functionality for each room, select a control system, that then helps pick the devices in each room and in the equipment rack, that hardware then dictates the proper wiring plan. That's the correct way to pre-wire.

Pulling wire here and there will be hit and miss but often a hit if executed thoughtfully.

Put an empty conduit tube in key media areas for future proofing.
Thanks, I am planning conduit everywhere with pull line in place for future use, and redundant wiring at every drop
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post #23 of 24 Old 06-11-2020, 08:59 AM
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Thank you for that great answer. I really appreciate it. Since I wrote that question I have learned a lot more about system control vs. system automation, and I now am seeing the advantage of a control solution like a crestron, C4, Savant, etc.

I am remodeling a house for eventual sale, and being the "thrifty" person that I am, I want to prewire to make it smart-home ready, but not actually pick a system for the next owner. My question is that I don't want to wire CrestNet cables if I don't have to. Can Cat 5e or Cat6 be used instead of CrestNet wiring?
From what I've read and heard from Real Estate agents, a smart home does not add a ton of value to resale. If you are trying to flip the house, maybe run some wires to key areas in the house, but I wouldn't invest in C4 or Crestron to sell a house. And I am a happy C4 customer and I tell you that advice.
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post #24 of 24 Old 06-11-2020, 09:19 AM
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That is my plan, to make it ready for a system, but to not install the system. Good advice, thanks!
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