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post #1 of 34 Old 04-21-2020, 09:21 AM - Thread Starter
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Building a New Home Please Help with AV!!!!!!!

I'm building a new House and Need Help!!!
hello All

I will be building a new home this summer. We are just finalizing the plans now...
10-15 years ago I was a huge tech guy. Had a beautiful home theatre, multiple receivers, Gaming computers, ....

But marriage, wife, kids.... I haven't done anything tech in 10 years.

Soooooooo.

What are the must haves in a new house design???

My basic ideas are

For internet main modem in basement - then Ill use 3 wired routers 1 on each floor for wifi. WIFI only for phones and laptops everything else wired.

2 Coax and 2 Cat 6 to every TV going to a media room in the basement.

Speakers in every room so we can stream (my brother just built he has Dayton Audio any good? He has displays / switches on his walls next to his light switches)

Pre wire for cameras outside

Pre wire for alarm system

Pre wire for some speakers outside and in garage

I also want a dedicated home theatre room in the basement. Not sure if I want a projector or just a 85 inch TV but this room will have a receiver, floor speakers, .....

Should I pre wire this room and run everything to the media room or keep the components for this dedicated home theater in the room ? (Rack in the Rear of it?)

What else should I be looking at or thinking about??

I am VERY excited. i have a large budget set aside for this stuff. (Large for a relativley poor person) Maybe 50k??

Thanks!

Any pics / advice would be great.


I will be planning this myself but will have a low voltage company do the wiring for me as I won't have time.
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post #2 of 34 Old 04-21-2020, 11:34 AM
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You put a spreadsheet together of each room and the room's functions and phase ie: Phase 1 - master bedroom: automated lights, whole house audio, 55" TV, touchpanel.
Then you pick out your control system. This will then guide rest of hardware purchases. That will then guide the wiring needs.
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post #3 of 34 Old 04-21-2020, 12:32 PM
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I suggest you go to Blackbox.com and buy a spool of cat6a shielded. Take a lot of pictures when everything is installed but before the Sheetrock goes up. Label your cables. Draw a diagram of your set up. The British house designing and building series Grand Designs is on Netflix and well worth watching but energy and land costs are higher in Great Britain.

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Display: LG OLED 65e6p, Player: OPPO UDP-203, AVR:Yamaha TSR 7810, Streaming: Comcast 60Mbps RG6 to Cat6a, Speakers: Mains Vandersteen IIC, Center, Surrounds, Rears Klipsch
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post #4 of 34 Old 04-21-2020, 04:45 PM - Thread Starter
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thanks guys.

what else should I do!?
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post #5 of 34 Old 04-21-2020, 06:45 PM
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Don't buy routers for each floor. Get one Unifi USG or USG Pro, three Unifi access points, and switches as needed. Run all the ethernet to a central location. Leave room in the design for a big 19" rack for all the networking gear and media devices. Use POE switches to power the access points remotely. They can be wall or ceiling mounted in out of the way locations, like closets.
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post #6 of 34 Old 04-21-2020, 10:50 PM
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My word of advice is not to get caught up in getting the "best of the best". A lot of my clients have been running wireless the wireless simplisafe alarm system for 10 years without a hiccup. Pre-wiring an actual wire at every window and door location is a lot of work. Also, 99% of the people that come to your house won't be able to tell the difference between $20 ceiling speakers and $500 triad speakers.
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post #7 of 34 Old 04-22-2020, 04:53 AM - Thread Starter
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My word of advice is not to get caught up in getting the "best of the best". A lot of my clients have been running wireless the wireless simplisafe alarm system for 10 years without a hiccup. Pre-wiring an actual wire at every window and door location is a lot of work. Also, 99% of the people that come to your house won't be able to tell the difference between $20 ceiling speakers and $500 triad speakers.
Yes my home audio will be from dayton Audio. They are quite good and affordable.

Alarm - my current alarm is wirelss and it works fine so Ill likely stick with that.

I might even consider a Ring System with a SIM card since I won't have a home phone.
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post #8 of 34 Old 04-22-2020, 08:00 AM
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Run conduit 1.5-2" to a well thought out drop point or two in each relevant room. Think about the most likely set up for each room, display, computer. My best guess is most equipment will be AV over internet protocol in the future-if HDMI fades out. VOIP, like OOMA, is a good home phone solution if you do not want to rely solely on cell phones. I agree use wifi for alarms. I think things like thermometers, lighting, curtains and appliances can be adequately operated manually. A complicated system will just be confusing. Put the internet modem where you can reach it easily as it will need to be restarted from time to time. A 19" rack mount cabinet is a good idea for a grounded patch panel, switches, perhaps an uninterrupted power supply and whatever else you think you will use house wide. I run the long cat6a runs from the patch panel to cat6a jacks in wall plates. Then use I up to 20' manufactured cat 6a patch cables to connect equipment to the wall plates.

Anál nathrach, orth’ bháis’s bethad, do chél dénmha
Display: LG OLED 65e6p, Player: OPPO UDP-203, AVR:Yamaha TSR 7810, Streaming: Comcast 60Mbps RG6 to Cat6a, Speakers: Mains Vandersteen IIC, Center, Surrounds, Rears Klipsch
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post #9 of 34 Old 04-22-2020, 08:12 AM
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you have a solid plan already, as well as lots of good advice has been given. running extra wire while the walls are open, even if you don't plan on using it for a while is great. documentation is key to utility and ease of maintenance and peace of mind. photos, diagrams and notes put into a binder will be a lifesaver / sanity saver years down the line.. an additional conduit, as well as wiring is another future-proofing saver.

I agree with the Ubiquiti Unifi suggestion. It requires some tech-savvy but is legitimately enterprise grade and scale-able and flexible.

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post #10 of 34 Old 04-25-2020, 05:31 PM - Thread Starter
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is sonos an option for whole home audio or am I crazy to consider it for the cost?
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post #11 of 34 Old 04-26-2020, 12:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by themasters78 View Post
is sonos an option for whole home audio or am I crazy to consider it for the cost?
Hard Wire the speakers to a central distribution rack while you can.
DON'T rely on wireless technology (if that is why you bring Sonos into the conversation).

You can always choose wireless for areas you goof up on and wireless is the only way left. But that's Plan C, not Plan A.
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post #12 of 34 Old 04-26-2020, 05:24 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by smoothtlk View Post
Hard Wire the speakers to a central distribution rack while you can.
DON'T rely on wireless technology (if that is why you bring Sonos into the conversation).

You can always choose wireless for areas you goof up on and wireless is the only way left. But that's Plan C, not Plan A.
oh yes. I'm going to have a web of cat 6 all over the house.. tons of it.

I don't really want anything wifi except my phones and laptops. I'm even going to run cat 6 to the garage door openers... Trying to think of everything.
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post #13 of 34 Old 04-27-2020, 11:29 AM
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I meant that you should put speaker wire (not just Cat6) from rack to the individual speaker locations for all zones.
Typically 14 gauge, 12 if long runs.
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post #14 of 34 Old 04-29-2020, 12:46 PM
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Recommendations

My parents built a house in 2006... I can share what I wish they had done differently. Lengthy, but bear with me:

A/V
  • Consolidate your home run in the basement. We have a telephone/network closet and the A/V distribution in separate parts of the basement. Don't do that. Keep it all together to make your life easier.
  • Make sure there is room for 2 full-sized racks and ample power
  • Don't plan on filling up your entire rack. We had equipment all up and down a single rack, and the stuff on the bottom of the rack got ruined in a flood. Now we have two racks...
  • Don't skimp on coax just because you have Cat6A. I read a story today of brand new house with nothing but Cat6A and a single coax run in the basement... We have a bundle with 2 Cat5E and 2 RG6 run from the basement to the back of every TV. Do something similar because you can always use the coax to do things like digital audio and whatnot. Additionally, one day you might decide to mount all your cable boxes on the backs of the TVs instead of home-running them. You'll need coax at each TV to do that.
  • Run a bundle of coax from your attic to your basement on whichever side you would need to put a satellite dish. That way, if you or future owner decides they want satellite one day, you already have it wired.
  • Everywhere you're going to have a computer, or think you could possibly have a computer, run 2 ethernet and 1 coax. These come in handy to plug in networked printers, and we've used some of the floor-level coax to add subwoofers over the years.
  • Run ethernet at floor-level in each room you have a TV. These can be used for remote HDMI wall plates to easily plug in Gaming consoles or laptops.
  • Run speaker wire to every ceiling where you might want speakers (including outside) and pre-wire for surround if you think you might want it in the future.
  • Keypads/Touchpanels - they're not really worth it. We have Sonos and it's worth every penny - so easy that kids can use it. No one wants to get up from their chair to change a song or mute the music when their cell phone rings. They want to be able to control everything from their phone or through Alexa/Google home. 15 years ago, I was gung ho on A/V keypads and touchpanels because I thought they looked cool. In reality, if we had installed them in 2007, they would be horrifically outdated today and it would cost a fortune to rip them all out and replace them with something more modern today. If you think you might want them in the future, run a Cat6A to a double-gang wall box everywhere you think you might want one.
  • ^ along those lines, explore rock-solid URC or RTI brand universal remote controls. They're an awesome alternative to keypad/touchpanels.

    Networking
  • Somewhere along the way, someone had the foresight to put 4 blank wall plates with ethernet behind them around the house high up on the walls. I terminated those and put up Unifi UAP-AC-Pros. Great idea, poor execution. Instead, put one blank wall plate with ethernet behind it on the ceiling dead center of your home on each floor. Ceiling is very important.
  • If I had my way, I'd put one of those plates centered (or close to it, taking into account light fixtures and fans) on the ceiling in every single room in the house. That way, you're futureproofed as far as Wi-Fi goes. The denser your Wi-Fi coverage, the more you can really take advantage of 1+ gbps connections using 80mhz channels of 5G. If one/room is overkill for your house, run 3 spread across each floor.
  • Use Ubiquiti networks products. I've had crappy linksys, TP-link, even commercial-grade Cisco access points in this house. Forget it all. Ubiquiti's UniFi line is the easiest, most powerful and robust network you're going to put in your house. If you want to pay someone to monitor your network and take care of any issues - you can put in whatever they recommend (Meraki, for example). But if you are somewhat network savvy and feel comfortable administering your own network, go the Ubiquiti route. You won't regret it and there is plenty of online support through forums.
  • Run ethernet and power to a centrally-located closet on each floor. You can use this location to add future smart home hubs that may require a central location for best wireless (Z-wave, zigbee, etc.) performance. Lutron Caseta and Liftmaster MyQ come to mind. You can also use this location to hide a networked family printer. That way if your kid needs to print a school project, he doesn't have to come into mom or dad's office to retrieve the papers.
  • Run an ethernet drop outdoors to the center of the back of your house (ideally about 8-10ft up under the eaves for weather protection) so you can add an outdoor access point if your outdoor coverage turns out to be lackluster
    Cameras
  • Run ethernet drops (1-2) to every corner of your home under the eaves for PoE IP cameras
  • Run ethernet and standard doorbell wire to your front and doorbells. This allows you to use a regular doorbell or Ring/Nest (using regular doorbell wiring) or a PoE doorbell in the future.
  • Run ethernet to the top right or left corner above your front door as well. Sometimes those Ring/Nest cams don't catch everything. Having another doorbell cam that constantly records with the rest of the system could be beneficial
  • Spend the extra money for RAB flood lights at every corner or side of your house. They've held up exceptionally well over the last 13 years. Buy the twin head with built in motion sensors, or skip the motion sensors and hook them all up to Lutron Caseta, Smart Things, and your camera system to have the lights trigger whenever motion is detected on the camera. Skip the ones with integrated LEDs unless you need to light up a large area - cheaper to replace a bulb than a fixture if the LEDs die. Go for screw-in with some nice 150W+ equivalent LED bulbs
  • IF you have a large backyard, run power and ethernet to a centrally located point high up on your house. You can use this for an external IR illuminator to light up the yard at night for cameras.

    Other recommendations:
  • Spend the extra money for Lutron dimmer switches. They just work. If you want some lighting automation, get the Lutron Caseta Pro. If you want all home lighting automated with the ability to do cool things like have an "All Off" switch by the door, explore Lutron RadioRA2.
  • Put in step lights by the interior steps and in your hallways to act as built-in night lights. Put 'em on a simple timer switch or Lutron Caseta smart switch.
  • If you can, run all of the aforementioned wiring in conduit with pull string in each box. This makes it super easy to upgrade wiring in the future. You'll need decently sized conduits for the cable bundles to each room. Regular-sized conduit will do for single runs for cameras and APs. We didn't do any of this and all of our low-voltage wiring is stapled to walls, making it next to impossible to pull Cat6A today.
  • If you can't do that, pick a few places and run PVC pipe basement to attic to make it easier to pull whatever cables you need later.
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post #15 of 34 Old 04-29-2020, 01:15 PM
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I am in the same boat as themasters78 and following this thread. Building a new home, doing my second dedicated home theater but I don't want to pay the mark ups the builders contracted company charges ie $295 for 6' HDMI cable when I am capable of doing things myself.
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post #16 of 34 Old 04-29-2020, 02:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amargolis View Post
My parents built a house in 2006... I can share what I wish they had done differently. Lengthy, but bear with me:

A/V
  • Consolidate your home run in the basement. We have a telephone/network closet and the A/V distribution in separate parts of the basement. Don't do that. Keep it all together to make your life easier.
  • Make sure there is room for 2 full-sized racks and ample power
  • Don't plan on filling up your entire rack. We had equipment all up and down a single rack, and the stuff on the bottom of the rack got ruined in a flood. Now we have two racks...
  • Don't skimp on coax just because you have Cat6A. I read a story today of brand new house with nothing but Cat6A and a single coax run in the basement... We have a bundle with 2 Cat5E and 2 RG6 run from the basement to the back of every TV. Do something similar because you can always use the coax to do things like digital audio and whatnot. Additionally, one day you might decide to mount all your cable boxes on the backs of the TVs instead of home-running them. You'll need coax at each TV to do that.
  • Run a bundle of coax from your attic to your basement on whichever side you would need to put a satellite dish. That way, if you or future owner decides they want satellite one day, you already have it wired.
  • Everywhere you're going to have a computer, or think you could possibly have a computer, run 2 ethernet and 1 coax. These come in handy to plug in networked printers, and we've used some of the floor-level coax to add subwoofers over the years.
  • Run ethernet at floor-level in each room you have a TV. These can be used for remote HDMI wall plates to easily plug in Gaming consoles or laptops.
  • Run speaker wire to every ceiling where you might want speakers (including outside) and pre-wire for surround if you think you might want it in the future.
  • Keypads/Touchpanels - they're not really worth it. We have Sonos and it's worth every penny - so easy that kids can use it. No one wants to get up from their chair to change a song or mute the music when their cell phone rings. They want to be able to control everything from their phone or through Alexa/Google home. 15 years ago, I was gung ho on A/V keypads and touchpanels because I thought they looked cool. In reality, if we had installed them in 2007, they would be horrifically outdated today and it would cost a fortune to rip them all out and replace them with something more modern today. If you think you might want them in the future, run a Cat6A to a double-gang wall box everywhere you think you might want one.
  • ^ along those lines, explore rock-solid URC or RTI brand universal remote controls. They're an awesome alternative to keypad/touchpanels.

    Networking
  • Somewhere along the way, someone had the foresight to put 4 blank wall plates with ethernet behind them around the house high up on the walls. I terminated those and put up Unifi UAP-AC-Pros. Great idea, poor execution. Instead, put one blank wall plate with ethernet behind it on the ceiling dead center of your home on each floor. Ceiling is very important.
  • If I had my way, I'd put one of those plates centered (or close to it, taking into account light fixtures and fans) on the ceiling in every single room in the house. That way, you're futureproofed as far as Wi-Fi goes. The denser your Wi-Fi coverage, the more you can really take advantage of 1+ gbps connections using 80mhz channels of 5G. If one/room is overkill for your house, run 3 spread across each floor.
  • Use Ubiquiti networks products. I've had crappy linksys, TP-link, even commercial-grade Cisco access points in this house. Forget it all. Ubiquiti's UniFi line is the easiest, most powerful and robust network you're going to put in your house. If you want to pay someone to monitor your network and take care of any issues - you can put in whatever they recommend (Meraki, for example). But if you are somewhat network savvy and feel comfortable administering your own network, go the Ubiquiti route. You won't regret it and there is plenty of online support through forums.
  • Run ethernet and power to a centrally-located closet on each floor. You can use this location to add future smart home hubs that may require a central location for best wireless (Z-wave, zigbee, etc.) performance. Lutron Caseta and Liftmaster MyQ come to mind. You can also use this location to hide a networked family printer. That way if your kid needs to print a school project, he doesn't have to come into mom or dad's office to retrieve the papers.
  • Run an ethernet drop outdoors to the center of the back of your house (ideally about 8-10ft up under the eaves for weather protection) so you can add an outdoor access point if your outdoor coverage turns out to be lackluster
    Cameras
  • Run ethernet drops (1-2) to every corner of your home under the eaves for PoE IP cameras
  • Run ethernet and standard doorbell wire to your front and doorbells. This allows you to use a regular doorbell or Ring/Nest (using regular doorbell wiring) or a PoE doorbell in the future.
  • Run ethernet to the top right or left corner above your front door as well. Sometimes those Ring/Nest cams don't catch everything. Having another doorbell cam that constantly records with the rest of the system could be beneficial
  • Spend the extra money for RAB flood lights at every corner or side of your house. They've held up exceptionally well over the last 13 years. Buy the twin head with built in motion sensors, or skip the motion sensors and hook them all up to Lutron Caseta, Smart Things, and your camera system to have the lights trigger whenever motion is detected on the camera. Skip the ones with integrated LEDs unless you need to light up a large area - cheaper to replace a bulb than a fixture if the LEDs die. Go for screw-in with some nice 150W+ equivalent LED bulbs
  • IF you have a large backyard, run power and ethernet to a centrally located point high up on your house. You can use this for an external IR illuminator to light up the yard at night for cameras.

    Other recommendations:
  • Spend the extra money for Lutron dimmer switches. They just work. If you want some lighting automation, get the Lutron Caseta Pro. If you want all home lighting automated with the ability to do cool things like have an "All Off" switch by the door, explore Lutron RadioRA2.
  • Put in step lights by the interior steps and in your hallways to act as built-in night lights. Put 'em on a simple timer switch or Lutron Caseta smart switch.
  • If you can, run all of the aforementioned wiring in conduit with pull string in each box. This makes it super easy to upgrade wiring in the future. You'll need decently sized conduits for the cable bundles to each room. Regular-sized conduit will do for single runs for cameras and APs. We didn't do any of this and all of our low-voltage wiring is stapled to walls, making it next to impossible to pull Cat6A today.
  • If you can't do that, pick a few places and run PVC pipe basement to attic to make it easier to pull whatever cables you need later.

great advice! I'm looking for as many as these posts as possible to finalize my Low Voltage plan.
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post #17 of 34 Old 04-29-2020, 03:10 PM
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great advice! I'm looking for as many as these posts as possible to finalize my Low Voltage plan.
no problem. sorry it's so wordy!
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post #18 of 34 Old 04-29-2020, 07:49 PM
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How many rooms arE you looking to do? Search my user name for a very similar question for when we built ~5 years ago. I ran ~8000’ of low voltage between cat 6, speaker and RG6. My whole home audio is all Sonos. Feed into 2 12 channel amps.

Here’s my setup for whole home audio
9 centrally located Sonos Connects (still supported abs can get on eBay for ~$150/unit)
12 channel episode amp x2 (can get on eBay for ~$400/ amp).
15 8” in ceiling speakers from htd.com ($100/ pair)

For ~$3k you can have close 10 zones for whole home.

If you want to control thermostats, lights, cameras then a control4 setup would be better. I don’t have any app controlled lighting or security.

The bottom of my rack you will see my internet
24 port Linksys gig speed up managed switch x 2 (~$75 each on eBay)
48 port patch panel from Monoprice (~$100)
3 Apple AirPort Extremes throughout house create mesh WiFi ( $75 each eBay or Craigslist)

Couple of tips.
Run rg6 (to use as RCA jacks) or optical Cable for a main TV to allow for sound to come out of in ceiling speakers in rooms adjacent to room with TV. We have a tv in our living room but everyday I play sound from this TV in my kitchen. Works awesome and I couldn’t imagine not having this.

I also put in at least 4 cat 6 jacks at HT/ high use point to be able to hardwire anything that I could.

Run an RG6 to the attic so you can put in a OTA antenna. I ditched cable and now get my local from OTA hooked up to a Tablo DVR with 4K Apple TV at each TV. Works slick as can be and don’t have to mess with distribute video which is mega $$$ and tough(er) to get high quality 4K.

Home theater
I have 2 local home theater surround setups. I didn’t route this back to central rack save for amp that powers sub for basement setup.
Run wires for in ceiling Atmos.
Follow Dolby Atmos guide for speaker location.
One is a 5.1 system as didn’t know about Atmos in 2014
Other is a 5.4.2 system with IB sub setup
IB= infinity baffle and is killer performance for low price and highest WAF of any sub setup. I have 4 18” woofers and only thing visible in the room are 2 grates in the wall. 5hz level for less than $1500 - nuts!
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post #19 of 34 Old 05-08-2020, 07:54 PM - Thread Starter
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are you guys mounting your Cable or Direct TV Boxes behind your TVs or all in the basement?

I don't want to then them all downstairs to the Media room. the IR repeaters always have issues in every setup I've seen.
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post #20 of 34 Old 05-09-2020, 10:26 AM
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are you guys mounting your Cable or Direct TV Boxes behind your TVs or all in the basement?

I don't want to then them all downstairs to the Media room. the IR repeaters always have issues in every setup I've seen.
You should not be designing the system to use IR at all if you are looking at a quality implementation. RS232 or TCP devices. The exception is cable boxes which "must" be IR. DirecTV is IP.

To enable that, you need to choose a control system BEFORE you choose any devices. The control system will provide the short list of what to implement. That then points to what to wire.
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post #21 of 34 Old 05-09-2020, 10:42 AM
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We did new home, this is how I did it... (sounds like we have similar goals)

I just built a home last year and like you added a theater and smart devices, wiring, etc

1. Sonance speakers
2. Lutron Radio Ra2 lights, shades, thermostats, motion / vacancy sensors.
3. Chamberlain Jack Shaft MyQ Garage door openers (app based - sweet)!
4. 3 cat 6 / 6a to each TV and coax and utility box for Xfinity box, Apple TV, etc behind larger TVs
5. Cat 6 and 6a to UniFi controller and 6 Ubiquiti access points (1 for outdoor)
6. Hard wired alarm (Honeywell)
7. Finally settled on Crestron Home control.
8. Ran all to equipment room in basement.
9. Hikvision NVR and cameras.


Of everything I added and spent money on, the highest value and most used are the Lutron lights. Bulletproof functionality (came from Z Wave), look great and with motions, we hardly touch a switch at any one time.

At each TV:


Lutron Radio Ra2


Sonance speakers, Sonos sound bar and Lutron shades
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Goodbye to a great audio and video genius and writer... JOHN GANNON. I enjoyed your friendship, wit and a nice long run we took around Indianapolis at CEDIA years back... and for buying my Runco 980 Ultra years back... you saved my ass! Rest in peace.
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post #22 of 34 Old 05-13-2020, 03:38 PM - Thread Starter
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I just built a home last year and like you added a theater and smart devices, wiring, etc

1. Sonance speakers
2. Lutron Radio Ra2 lights, shades, thermostats, motion / vacancy sensors.
3. Chamberlain Jack Shaft MyQ Garage door openers (app based - sweet)!
4. 3 cat 6 / 6a to each TV and coax and utility box for Xfinity box, Apple TV, etc behind larger TVs
5. Cat 6 and 6a to UniFi controller and 6 Ubiquiti access points (1 for outdoor)
6. Hard wired alarm (Honeywell)
7. Finally settled on Crestron Home control.
8. Ran all to equipment room in basement.
9. Hikvision NVR and cameras.


Of everything I added and spent money on, the highest value and most used are the Lutron lights. Bulletproof functionality (came from Z Wave), look great and with motions, we hardly touch a switch at any one time.

At each TV:


Lutron Radio Ra2


Sonance speakers, Sonos sound bar and Lutron shades
very nice.
can you post a pic of your equipment room please?
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post #23 of 34 Old 05-13-2020, 08:04 PM - Thread Starter
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should i be considering a video matrix system?
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post #24 of 34 Old 05-13-2020, 08:53 PM
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HDMI matrix system

It would be more perfect if there is an HDMI matrix system.
It is better to lay a few more cat6 cable for backup. shield cable would be better.
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post #25 of 34 Old 05-14-2020, 07:18 AM
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Quote:
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should i be considering a video matrix system?
Yes. For the most flexibility and ease of implementing a quality control system.

But....you should be thinking of the control system FIRST. Not the wiring.

Control system then Devices to control, then the wiring that supports those devices. Add a few more wires as backup and expansion. Add an EMPTY conduit to key areas to pull a new not thought about cable. The Control system will determine the short list of compatible devices. No control system works with everything. Stay AWAY from any infrared equipment if you want a reliable system. That's not to say ignore IR - you should put Cat cable in for future proofing on IR but don't intend to use it.

Equipment should be in a centrally located equipment rack that has cooling and electrical service.

Prewire each room for speakers. One wire per speaker to the equipment rack.

UPS / power conditioner / remote cycle hardware at the base of the equipment rack.

Internet and cable / Sat dish and phone systems wired to the equipment closet from the utilities.
Dish heater wires to the roof if in northern climates.
OTA antenna and rotator wires to the rooftop if you are near OTA sources.
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post #26 of 34 Old 05-14-2020, 08:22 PM - Thread Starter
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If I were to get a control 4 video matrix or another matrix, how would my direct tv or cable box remotes work?

Would they be IR? Like IR Repeater from TV To the equipment room for each directv, apple tv, .....
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post #27 of 34 Old 05-14-2020, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by themasters78 View Post
If I were to get a control 4 video matrix or another matrix, how would my direct tv or cable box remotes work?

Would they be IR? Like IR Repeater from TV To the equipment room for each directv, apple tv, .....
They would be IP control if possible, otherwise IR would be delivered to the TV via the HDBaseT baluns the C4 matrix uses and to the components from the matrix, most likely in the same rack. Then of course you'd use the C4 remote for all control.

C4 Remote --> C4 Controller --> C4 Matrix --(IR/IP)--> Cable box/Apple etc

Last edited by tcramer; 05-14-2020 at 09:00 PM.
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post #28 of 34 Old 05-14-2020, 09:26 PM
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I would not bother with putting ceiling speakers all over the house. By the time you are done, it will be cheaper and far easier to do whole house audio with individual (or stereo paired) Sonos speakers in the rooms where you want them. If you don't want to go Sonos, the Echo Studios are another option.
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post #29 of 34 Old 05-16-2020, 06:46 AM
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I would not bother with putting ceiling speakers all over the house. By the time you are done, it will be cheaper and far easier to do whole house audio with individual (or stereo paired) Sonos speakers in the rooms where you want them. If you don't want to go Sonos, the Echo Studios are another option.
I am in the large never use ceiling speakers faction. They sound seems artificial and there is no sense of a sound stage...elevator music.

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I was thinking about ditching the ceiling speakers as well.

I throw 5-6 sonos systems all over the house inc arcs under each tv and call it a day.
Add a sub in my main tv watching area downstairs.

Ive been doing some research on a matrix and it looks like the way to go. 8 x 8 maybe - throw each cable box down there. Tvs will have apple (Samsung) or google (Sony) depends on what I get so not sure I need the matrix I don't know so many options!!

Sonos is just so easy rather than whole home audio and they look great. But im not crazy about having them plugged in.
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