Why is a flat frequency response desired for speakers but not headphones? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 4 Old 12-25-2019, 07:51 PM - Thread Starter
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Why is a flat frequency response desired for speakers but not headphones?

Exactly as the title asks. I know for speakers, there are a standard set of measurements which correlate highly with sound quality and a flat an-echoic on-axis frequency response is one of them.

Why don't headphones follow the same standard?

For example, a long time standard for headphone neutrality would be the Sennheiser HD600 but the frequency response is anything but flat: https://www.rtings.com/headphones/1-3-1/graph#325/3182

Can anyone explain why this is?
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post #2 of 4 Old 12-25-2019, 07:55 PM
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Basically, because they sit so close to your ear, the proximity/geometry of the ear changes the way your ear handles certain frequencies. In order to achieve neutral response that close to your ear, a completely different frequency response curve is needed. The curve is not flat, but when it's on your head, it can sound flat.

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post #3 of 4 Old 12-25-2019, 08:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue 72 View Post
Basically, because they sit so close to your ear, the proximity/geometry of the ear changes the way your ear handles certain frequencies. In order to achieve neutral response that close to your ear, a completely different frequency response curve is needed. The curve is not flat, but when it's on your head, it can sound flat.
Thanks for the response! That makes sense. So because everyone's ears are a little different does this imply that different headphones may sound more neutral to each individual?
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post #4 of 4 Old 12-26-2019, 04:25 PM
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Start here:
https://www.innerfidelity.com/headph...ents-explained

TCL R615 | Sony UBP-X700 | Integra DTR-7.8 | Front = Klipsch KLF-20 | Center & Surrounds = Klipsch KG 5.5 | Subwoofers = 2x sealed Velodyne ULD-15 and 6x ported subs with miniDSP 2x4
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