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post #1 of 8 Old 04-06-2020, 01:20 PM - Thread Starter
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ARC Confusion

I currently have a 5.1 setup with an old 55" Samsung LCD from 2007 and a newer Onkyo TX-NR646 7.2-Channel Network A/V Receiver. The receiver has HDMI 2.0a/HDCP 2.2 and supports ARC.

I'm looking at getting the LG 65" C9 OLED this year which has HDMI 2.1 and eARC.

I'm also thinking of getting the new Xbox series X when it comes out end of year which also has HDMI 2.1.

I would then use the Xbox as my main BR player and retire my OPPO player.

However I really didn't want to have to buy a new receiver and from my research it doesn't seem like many even support HDMI 2.1 yet. So during my research I discovered ARC. My understanding was that instead of plugging everything into my receiver I would plug everything into the new TV and allow the sound to go to the receiver through ARC. I assumed that if I plug all my HDMI devices into my 2.0a receiver then I'd lose some of the benefits of 2.1? Also the TV supports eARC yet the receiver is only ARC so not sure if that's any issue.

Just looking for some education. Thanks.

Dan
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post #2 of 8 Old 04-06-2020, 05:09 PM
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^^^^^ eARC is possible with the HDMI 2.0 chipsets but it's up to the mfr if the chips they used were designed for an eARC firmware upgrade. Not all device mfrs will upgrade their devices for eARC, they'd rather have you purchase a newer unit. For eARC to work properly, both HDMI chipsets on source and sink should support it. Otherwise, you'll just get ARC. It also might be useful to find out which HDMI 2.1 option sets your new devices support. HDMI 2.1 doesn't mean that ALL of the HDMI 2.1 option sets are supported. If the device mfr advertises HDMI 2.1, they are supposed to list which options are currently available according to the marketing guidelines set forth by HDMI.org.


ARC/eARC can be a real headache for some so if ARC/eARC is what you want just be prepare.

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post #3 of 8 Old 04-06-2020, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalman2112 View Post
I currently have a 5.1 setup with an old 55" Samsung LCD from 2007 and a newer Onkyo TX-NR646 7.2-Channel Network A/V Receiver. The receiver has HDMI 2.0a/HDCP 2.2 and supports ARC.

I'm looking at getting the LG 65" C9 OLED this year which has HDMI 2.1 and eARC.

I'm also thinking of getting the new Xbox series X when it comes out end of year which also has HDMI 2.1.

I would then use the Xbox as my main BR player and retire my OPPO player.

However I really didn't want to have to buy a new receiver and from my research it doesn't seem like many even support HDMI 2.1 yet. So during my research I discovered ARC. My understanding was that instead of plugging everything into my receiver I would plug everything into the new TV and allow the sound to go to the receiver through ARC.I assumed that if I plug all my HDMI devices into my 2.0a receiver then I'd lose some of the benefits of 2.1? Also the TV supports eARC yet the receiver is only ARC so not sure if that's any issue.

Just looking for some education. Thanks.

Dan
If your receiver does not support eARC then you are left with ARC even though the TV supports the newer standard. As far as audio goes you don't gain anything by feeding all your inputs through the TV first and it's questionable if there would be any benefit to the video. Depending on your cable management you might also end up with an octopus of cables forming a dangling eyesore.

The one benefit you might see is a lower likelihood of problems keeping the audio and the video in sync. All that may come at the cost of unpredictable behavior with the various HDMI components due to inconsistency of ARC implementations between manufacturers. If you search for "ARC" related posts in these forums you will find scores of examples of folks who gave up on ARC and fell back on using Optical to feed the audio back from the TV to the AVR. Most would recommend that you run all your inputs though the AVR and rely on ARC only for audio originating from the TV and its apps.

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post #4 of 8 Old 04-06-2020, 07:45 PM
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The only thing you'll want to plug into the C9 is the Xbox Series X. This is because you'll lose VRR (and most likely ALLM) if you plug it into the receiver. Even the upcoming new receivers may not pass through VRR. But because you're limited to ARC you'll only get Dolby Digital 5.1 back to the AVR. This means you'll lose TrueHD and DTS MA if you play your BRs on the Xbox. I'd play them on the Oppo connected to the AVR.
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post #5 of 8 Old 04-06-2020, 07:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smdelaney View Post
If your receiver does not support eARC then you are left with ARC even though the TV supports the newer standard. As far as audio goes you don't gain anything by feeding all your inputs through the TV first and it's questionable if there would be any benefit to the video.
The Xbox Series X is the only device he'd want to plug into the TV for VRR, ALLM and 4K120. Everything else should go to the AVR as you suggest.
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post #6 of 8 Old 04-06-2020, 07:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalman2112 View Post
I currently have a 5.1 setup with an old 55" Samsung LCD from 2007 and a newer Onkyo TX-NR646 7.2-Channel Network A/V Receiver. The receiver has HDMI 2.0a/HDCP 2.2 and supports ARC.

I'm looking at getting the LG 65" C9 OLED this year which has HDMI 2.1 and eARC.

I'm also thinking of getting the new Xbox series X when it comes out end of year which also has HDMI 2.1.

I would then use the Xbox as my main BR player and retire my OPPO player.

However I really didn't want to have to buy a new receiver and from my research it doesn't seem like many even support HDMI 2.1 yet. So during my research I discovered ARC. My understanding was that instead of plugging everything into my receiver I would plug everything into the new TV and allow the sound to go to the receiver through ARC. I assumed that if I plug all my HDMI devices into my 2.0a receiver then I'd lose some of the benefits of 2.1? Also the TV supports eARC yet the receiver is only ARC so not sure if that's any issue.

Just looking for some education. Thanks.

Dan
I vote for plugging everything into the AVR via native HDMI.
All will work (some optimally, some very good).

Pretty sure ARC requires HDMI-CEC to be enabled (I use Harmony remotes, so I hate CEC).

ARC should allow anything generated from TV (ATSC-tuner, build-in Apps, etc. ) to sounds pretty good and multi-channel. Can't really imagine ARC being helpful anywhere else.

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post #7 of 8 Old 04-07-2020, 04:44 AM - Thread Starter
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The Oppo is only HDMI 1.4. Won't I lose all HDR, etc.?

Quote:
Originally Posted by avernar View Post
The only thing you'll want to plug into the C9 is the Xbox Series X. This is because you'll lose VRR (and most likely ALLM) if you plug it into the receiver. Even the upcoming new receivers may not pass through VRR. But because you're limited to ARC you'll only get Dolby Digital 5.1 back to the AVR. This means you'll lose TrueHD and DTS MA if you play your BRs on the Xbox. I'd play them on the Oppo connected to the AVR.
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post #8 of 8 Old 04-07-2020, 06:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalman2112 View Post
The Oppo is only HDMI 1.4. Won't I lose all HDR, etc.?
That sounds like it's not a UHD player so yeah. You'll be limited to lossy audio formats playing on the Xbox when it's hooked up to the TV.
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