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post #2281 of 2298 Old 10-31-2019, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post
.....with the aid of another nephew -- who thinks he is Teddy Roosevelt -- bury them in the basement.
"Teddy, it's time to dig another lock for the canal!"

I think its a wonderful movie, but wifey says not.
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post #2282 of 2298 Old 11-01-2019, 04:30 AM
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Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), directed by Frank Capra.
...
I always enjoy seeing singer Priscilla Lane; she really does have a girl-next-door appeal. A brief filmography but she was in some good ones, such as Walsh's The Roaring Twenties (1939) and Hitchcock's Saboteur (1942). She does a bit of Code-compliant frustration of a bride who wants her wedding night.

Raymond Massey takes over from Boris Karloff who played the Frankenstein brother on the stage. "Looks just like Karloff" is a recurring jibe, probably a self-referential bit in the play.
...
-Bill
If I'm not mistaken, Priscilla Lane is also immortalized in J.D. Salinger's novel, The Catcher in the Rye, where Holden Caulfield seems to be a bit taken by a scene and a line or two exchanged between her and James Cagney in The Roaring Twenties.

Also, if I recall correctly from reading Frank Capra's autobiography, The Name Above the Title, many years ago, the theatrical release of this movie version of Arsenic and Old Lace had been delayed so long for various reasons it turned out Karloff could have finished his Broadway commitment and still appeared in the movie after all. Massey was terrific and scary. But it was a shame not to have had Boris Karloff repeat the role he created on stage and was truly born to play...in a Capra film!

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post #2283 of 2298 Old 11-01-2019, 05:45 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by hitchfan View Post
If I'm not mistaken, Priscilla Lane is also immortalized in J.D. Salinger's novel, The Catcher in the Rye, where Holden Caulfield seems to be a bit taken by a scene and a line or two exchanged between her and James Cagney in The Roaring Twenties.

Also, if I recall correctly from reading Frank Capra's autobiography, The Name Above the Title, many years ago, the theatrical release of this movie version of Arsenic and Old Lace had been delayed so long for various reasons it turned out Karloff could have finished his Broadway commitment and still appeared in the movie after all. Massey was terrific and scary. But it was a shame not to have had Boris Karloff repeat the role he created on stage and was truly born to play...in a Capra film!
This was posted in another forum:

Quote:
-- Frank Capra directed the film for the Warner Bros. Studio just before enlisting in the U.S. Army Signal Corps in 1941 at the outbreak of WW2.

-- His plan was to use the percentage profits to support his family during the war years to come.

-- Warners arrangement for the film rights to ARSENIC was that the picture could only be released after the stage play had finished its Broadway run.

-- Only problem ... the play continued to entertain wartime audiences for another three years, meaning no monies yet for the Capra family until its eventual release in 1944.

__________________________________________________ __________________


-- One evening in 1943, Lt. Col. Capra and his film crew took the night off from their documentary feature work to enjoy a little R&R at a London pub.

-- Also present were several boisterous U.S. flyers from a nearby airfield.

-- One of the airmen got up from his table to use the restroom which was located on the second floor of the pub.

-- As he reached the bottom of the staircase, he sudenly drew out an imaginary sword and ran up the stairs, shouting ... "CHARGE!" to peals of laughter from his table mates.

-- A surprised Capra, recognizing the gesture, went over to the flyers' table and asked where they knew that gag from.

-- They told him that it was a funny scene from a film they had watched on their base the night before.

__________________________________________________ __________________


-- The next day, an angry Capra made a trans-Atlantic call to Hollywood and demanded to know why the movie was in release but that his family was still not receiving any profits.

-- A sheepish Jack Warner admitted that the film was not yet in general release to the American public, but in a patriotic gesture he had petitioned the play's attorneys to allow the picture to be shown at overseas bases only, with no compensation.
-Bill
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post #2284 of 2298 Old 11-01-2019, 01:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post
Raymond Massey takes over from Boris Karloff who played the Frankenstein brother on the stage.
I should add: this may have been Karloff's choice. He was an investor in the stage play and obviously wanted it to do as well as possible. And he was the chief draw for audiences, making it hard to get away.

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post #2285 of 2298 Old 11-03-2019, 12:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Comes a Horseman (1978), directed by Alan J. Pakula.

It opens with a little historical disorientation: cowpokes James Caan and Mark Harmon rise and get their herd moving, then pause to remove their hats for a funeral on the hill. We then see we are in the 20th century, 1945 in fact.

Not much has changed: we still have range wars and a land baron who wants everything he can see. In a nice twist, even he is getting muscled by the oil men who want something else from the land. Bad man though he is we like him better because he wants to the land to stay cattle country.

Rich Jason Robards and struggling rancher Jane Fonda have some history; we don't find out what for a long time. She is hard and hard working, always wearing men's clothes. Her one employee calls her a "banshee".

James Caan is her new partner. Half of the story is their laconic, difficult courtship. The actor may seem more of a city guy, but he had done westerns before. You can be a cowboy if you can ride a horse and don't talk too much.

This was the role that helped get Richard Farnsworth from stunt man and background parts into becoming a known face and even leading man. He was 58 and looked older because of weathering.

The film wants to be respectful of the western and takes both the action and romance parts of the story seriously. Lovely photography with a subdued color palette by Gordon Willis (The Godfather (1972), Klute (1971), Stardust Memories (1980)) and traditional score by Michael Small.

The gear and horse-handling seem nicely authentic, hearkening back to the Budd Boetticher films of the 1950s.

I've seen complaints that the plot goes off the rails in the last act. Maybe, but it has action and violence throughout and an action climax does not seem wrong to me.

Filmed in the Coconino National Forest of AZ. A stuntman was killed during production. They retained the scene where he is dragged by a horse but not the fatality itself.

Available on Blu-ray from Twilight Time. The web page notes:

Quote:

A NOTE ABOUT THE TRANSFER: While Twilight Time believes Comes a Horseman to be a fine, and generally overlooked hidden treasure from the 1970s, and worthy of a second look by Blu-ray aficionados, we recognize it has not survived in the greatest of shape. We hope that those of you who care enough to buy a copy will forgive the unusually high (for a TT release) level of “speckling” (minus density) and general debris that mar the work of master cinematographer, Gordon Willis, in this hi-def presentation.

We have rejected many other titles and transfers for similar reasons, but after some consideration decided this film was too important to let go. In light of this fact, we are offering it at a reduced price ($22.95 SRP) to encourage those on the fence about it.

TT strives always to strike a balance between a duty to preserve the legacy of film history, as well as presenting the very best version of a film in hi-def as possible under the circumstances.
Given that caution I was expecting some sort of video disaster but the Blu-ray is quite watchable. You do see "debris" and marks from time to time.



-Bill
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post #2286 of 2298 Old 11-07-2019, 08:24 AM - Thread Starter
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All Through the Night (1942), directed by Vincent Sherman.

It's gamblers vs nazis in a comedy/action picture! What's not to like? The US was not in the war yet but attitudes were changing and Hollywood had definitely picked a side. Constant snappy patter and the old double chase.

Having just done High Sierra (1941) and The Maltese Falcon (1941), Humphrey Bogart continued moving into leading man roles. Casablanca (1942) followed the same year.

I don't remember noticing Kaaren Verne before. She gets credit for her own singing, including the title song by Johnny Mercer. I don't see any mention of her music talents in the online bio material, but she also gets credit for playing classical piano in Kings Row (1942).

Her nightclub outfit really puts the silver in Silver Screen. Honestly, they had such beautiful images in those days, just tossing them off in every film. This one was photographed by the great Sidney Hickox.

At the action climax nazi bad guy Conrad Veidt plans to ram a battleship with a speedboat full of explosives. For some reason he is taking along his Dachshund:

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Yes, Mr. Donahue. In a few minutes you and I and Hansel will die.
Cut to the dog, watching with a "Wait, what?" expression. I'm afraid that's the last we see of poor little Hansel.

Peter Lorre and Judith Anderson are additional baddies.

Look for cherubic Jackie Gleason at age 25.

Is this the first mention of the Dachau prison camp in film?

Available on DVD with an edited commentary by the director (99 at the time, his last year) and Bogart biographer Eric Lax.



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post #2287 of 2298 Old 11-10-2019, 01:19 PM
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All Through the Night (1942), directed by Vincent Sherman.
Searching for it on a streaming service, I found this publicity pic of Kaaren wearing what is likely that same dress. Silver screen classy, indeed. Kind of amazing what those costume departments rustled up for their stars to wear.

Edit: 20 minutes in. By golly, Bill, this is a regular Nick & Nora yap fest, hilarious dialog. William Demarest, Jackie Gleason, Phil Silvers (the last two looking very young), and a whole raft of Warner Bros' stock players. This one's a winner, bet it all on the nose.
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post #2288 of 2298 Old 11-15-2019, 08:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Anastasia (1956), directed by Anatole Litvak.

£10 million is just sitting in a bank in London with no one to collect it, the entire Romanov royal family -- even the children -- having been executed by the Bolsheviks in 1918. The clever Russian ex-General plans to fix that by creating a convincing impersonator of the youngest daughter: Anastasia. She's good at the job, in fact almost too convincing. Could she really be...?

This is an example of the sort of lush, expensive production Fox could do in the 1950s. CinemaScope 2.55:1, rich costumes and sets, large ballroom crowds. I review it because with a rewatch I realize how my interpretation has changed over the years. The story has always been ambiguous -- is she or isn't she? -- but when young I just presumed she really was the princess, with that delicious irony of the con-men accidentally discovering the real heir.

Now I'm more inclined to think she isn't; she is either deluded or just going along with it. What struck me this time was how much people wanted to believe. In fact: how much they were willing to pretend to believe, to live in a fantasy they knew was not true. The fierce Dowager Empress is finally won over but tells the girl: "If it is not you, don't ever tell me".

Why is the fantasy so attractive? Most people will not get any money from the scam. Anastasia is not going to raise an army and invade Soviet Russia. You can understand the emigrees wanting their old life back. The population of Russian nobles and their retainers living in exile, reduced to driving cabs and running restaurants: that really happened and was often treated in film. See Ronald Colman in The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo (1935).

What about the rest of us? Why do we care? Is the romance of royalty, or of a princess returned from the dead, so appealing? It must be.

In an odd parallel, Ingrid Bergman had been in exile from the US for many years following a scandalous affair and marriage with director Roberto Rossellini. This was her comeback role. And then she had to disentangle herself from the Svengali-like domination of Rossellini, just as her character cannot be controlled by the General.

Has any other actor had a year like Yul Brynner in 1956? This, The Ten Commandments (1956) and The King and I (1956), and he gave dominating performances in all three.

Director Litvak saw the Russian Revolution up close.

Historically there were a lot of Romanov pretenders and persistent rumors that Anastasia had survived. The film is inspired by the case of the most prominent candidate, Anna Anderson, who in life was apparently barking mad. According to the wikipedia, DNA research since the fall of the Soviet Union has proved that Anastasia's bones lie in the same mass graves as the rest of her family.

Alfred Newman score, Jack Hildyard photography.

Available on Blu-ray from Twilight Time. The black levels are just fair. Two commentary tracks.



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post #2289 of 2298 Old 11-18-2019, 11:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post
Village of the Damned (1960), directed by Wolf Rilla.

A sturdy, effective Quatermass-genre plot only 71 minutes long. Everyone in an English village drops unconscious for several hours and no one can get in without also fainting. Afterwards their recovery seems without incident until they find that all women of childbearing age are now pregnant. This obviously causes much consternation, even more so when the implications become clear. Alien force? Mutation? It turns out the same thing has happened elsewhere.

The children, creepy blonde Aryans, are all healthy but grow abnormally quickly, are emotionless and intelligent and reveal dangerous psychic powers. What to do about them, given they can read and control minds and have a lively survival response?

We're still in the classic science fiction era: the heroes are stalwart and the alien menace must be eliminated. The military is smart and efficient. That the menace are children...it gives one pause, but not a lot.

The film largely avoids the complication that parents will naturally feel affection towards the children, no matter how strangely born. With one exception: George Sanders is an older man with a younger wife, and his joy at having a son is mixed with the understanding that he is not the biological father, as well as the fear that the boy is entirely alien and perhaps dangerous.

Many familiar faces from later British film and TV; look for Peter Vaughn as the policeman on a bicycle.

Adapted from John Wyndham's The Midwich Cuckoos. He was a prolific SF author whose work could be mined for more screenplays. And his Day of the Triffids (1962) exists only in a dismal cropped DVD version and needs a good upgrade.

The DVD has commentary track with production details. He points out that it is easy to think of the children as little Nazi supermen infiltrators.
Some additional notes and new thumbnails from the Blu-ray.

  • I read John Wyndham's The Midwich Cuckoos recently and the film is a reasonably faithful adaptation. "Midwich" is the name of the village, and the old-world cuckoo lays its eggs in other birds' nests. The parents raise the alien chicks and their own children are displaced.
  • Wyndham is fun to read; he has an easy-going intelligence, using the formula of putting one element of the fantastic into normal surroundings. His The Day of the Triffids (1962) is still waiting a quality restoration. The Kraken Wakes (undersea invaders come onto land) and The Chrysalids (aka "Re-Birth", post-apocalyptic recovery) are still waiting to be made.
  • The effect of the glowing eyes: this time it seemed to me that this is visible only to the movie audience, not to the people in the story. In the book all the children have strange "golden eyes".
  • The effect was a simple one: they made a negative of each iris and overlaid it onto a still photo.
  • Martin Stephens, who plays the leader of the children, gave another notably unsettling performance in The Innocents (1961) the next year.
  • His own voice was dubbed in for his lines, giving his dialogue a slightly unreal quality.
  • Barbara Shelley, playing his mother, was a noted scream queen for Hammer.
  • Although George Sanders had a trademark caddish personality, he is also good at playing decent characters, as here and in The Seventh Sin (1957).
  • The studio disliked the film and was sure it would flop. Audiences disagreed.
  • Remade by John Carpenter in 1995.

Available on Blu-ray from Warner Archive. The detailed commentary track by Steve Haberman is brought forward from the DVD.



-Bill
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post #2290 of 2298 Old 11-21-2019, 03:13 PM - Thread Starter
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The Boston Strangler (1968), directed by Richard Fleischer.

This was controversial at the time, released just four years after the last of thirteen horrific rape-mutilation-murders. At the time Albert DeSalvo was in prison for other crimes and never tried for the murders themselves. He was paid for his story, something that would not be allowed after the "Son of Sam" killings in the 1970s. He was murdered in prison in 1973.

Quoting Roger Ebert from the wikipedia article:

Quote:
The Boston Strangler requires a judgment not only on the quality of the film (very good), but also on its moral and ethical implications... The events described in Frank's book have been altered considerably in the film. This is essentially a work of fiction 'based' on the real events. And based on them in such a way to entertain us, which it does, but for the wrong reasons, I believe. This film, which was made so well, should not have been made at all.
The first hour is entirely police procedural with a rich set of character actors of that era, including George Kennedy, William Marshall (one of the great voices of the century), William Hickey and introducing Sally Kellerman. Henry Fonda is the academic administrator drafted to lead the task force.

Round up the usual perverts, and we get a view of phone tracing when it meant actually looking at the mechanical switching equipment.

Why do the women keep letting him in? Is it strange he started with old women and moved to young ones? His victims are all white, until they are not.

They actually brought in a famous "psychic detective".

It is an hour before we get to Tony Curtis as DeSalvo and there is no doubt that he is the killer. The confirmation phase of the hunt is particularly exciting: closing in, the times of the crimes keep matching.

Curtis is convincing in the role but it didn't do anything to establish him as a dramatic actor. Despite films like The Defiant Ones (1958) and especially Sweet Smell of Success (1957) he was never taken seriously.

The arrest and questioning are particularly fictionalized. A whole "multiple personality" plot is invented, where the killer is not even aware of his crimes. Nothing like that was ever suggested in the real case. The dramatic flow slows considerably in the last half hour, which is all about working on the prisoner, his dawning realization of what he has done.

This fits with the director's other true-crime pictures -- Compulsion (1959) and 10 Rillington Place (1971) -- where he interested in insanity and the psychological states of the offenders.

Fleischer makes considerable use of the multi-pane screens which we saw in The Thomas Crown Affair (1968). DePalma used the technique for a while but it didn't catch on in feature films. It has its uses: multiple views of the same tense scene, or contrasting juxtapositions, or just a presentation of how much is going on in a busy city at any one time.

At one time we had much speculation that DeSalvo gave a false confession. Later DNA analysis showed he did the final murder. Did he do all the murders attributed to him? Unknown.

Available on Blu-ray from Twilight Time.



-Bill
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post #2291 of 2298 Old 11-26-2019, 11:46 AM - Thread Starter
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The Great Train Robbery (1978), written and directed by Michael Crichton.

Aka The First Great Train Robbery.

The problem with this one is that -- given the title -- we'd like to get to the exciting robbery, but that is not until the last half hour. The first three quarters of the film is taken up with locating and duplicating four keys to the gold bullion safes. This allows much period detail, crime lingo and satirical looks at Victorian England, which can be interesting, but I suspect a lot of viewers were lost or simply bored.

It is a good role for Sean Connery as the master criminal. Donald Sutherland and Lesley-Anne Down (Hanover Street (1979)) are fine as other members of the plot.

The quest for the keys does have clever mission-impossible shenanigans. Historical bits that stuck with me:

  • The scene in the ratting den where men bet on how many rats a dog can kill in three minutes. That terrier looks really eager to get to it and apparently they used real wild rats which the dog really killed. The RSPCA was not pleased.
  • A woman's public hanging at Newgate Prison. The happy crowd chants "Oh! My! I think I'm going to die!"
  • A quick dash through a "penny hang", an establishment where for that price you could drape yourself over a rope rather than sleeping on the floor or in the street.

All train heist films have dangerous climbing around on the outside of the cars. Connery insisted on doing his own stunt work but it was much harder than he expected. The train was running faster than it should have and he was burned by cinders and blinded by smoke, falling for real more than once. Those overpasses really do seem to have only an inch to spare.

Michael Crichton directed his screenplay adapted from his own novel. The story is loosely inspired by the Great Gold Robbery of 1855.

Jerry Goldsmith score. Photographed by Geoffrey Unsworth.

Available on Blu-ray from Kino. Not much hidef detail here; filtered lenses were used to give a soft antique look. No subtitles, but tracks are available online.



-Bill
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post #2292 of 2298 Old 11-26-2019, 12:24 PM
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This allows much period detail, crime lingo and satirical looks at Victorian England, which can be interesting,
I read the book years ago, and one rather disturbing detail that stuck with me was the chapter title "The Necessity of a Fresh" and the following explanation of what that phrase meant.

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post #2293 of 2298 Old 11-26-2019, 12:44 PM - Thread Starter
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I read the book years ago, and one rather disturbing detail that stuck with me was the chapter title "The Necessity of a Fresh" and the following explanation of what that phrase meant.
I had to look that up: the belief that sex with a virgin cures clap. I don't remember the phrase from the film, but the scenario sounds familiar... it's been months.

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post #2294 of 2298 Old 11-26-2019, 02:36 PM
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I had to look that up: the belief that sex with a virgin cures clap.
Not only that, but the disturbing detail that (not a spoiler, but it's pretty gross so I'll put it out of sight in a spoiler box)...

Spoiler!


I forget how that played into the plot of the book.

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post #2295 of 2298 Old 11-28-2019, 02:48 PM
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I'm not sure I've seen it since release, but saw it during multiple matinees at that time, it was that much fun. I mean, Connery was practically Bond-ing it up again, and with panache. Worth the $2.50 matinee ticket.

With this, and Nick Meyer's Seven Per Cent Solution, there were a very few films that actually indulged in some unrosy views towards living in this late Victorian era. I personally enjoyed this film's slow buildup to the robbery, which you accurately attribute to a Mission Impossible (TV series) recipe for suspense. The Sting did the same thing, and did anyone complain about that film's story? (Okay, okay, there was a LOT more intrigues and buildup to that film's climax, but still....)

Connery was almost 50 years old when he did this. That he dared to do much of his own stunt work was pretty damn impressive. We don't have many actors/stars like this anymore IMHO. (I wonder if he finagled to get additional salary for being his own stunt man. He did similar for Zardoz where he saved the production money, but pocketed some, for being his own driver in Ireland. Times were a little hard for him post-Bond before his star rose again.)
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post #2296 of 2298 Old 11-29-2019, 10:40 AM
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The Boston Strangler (1968), directed by Richard Fleischer.
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The Naked Prey (1966), directed by Cornel Wilde.

Pure survival adventure story with very little adulteration, although the Hollywood conventions are torqued a bit. Set "about 100 years ago".

Big game guide Cornel Wilde has an arrogant and stupid client who insults some local African warriors, who then massacre the safari. The survivors are taken back to the village and tortured and killed in all sorts of inventive and festive ways; one is battered and baked up extra crispy.

Because Wilde has been respectful, stoic and uncomplaining, they treat him better: stripped naked, he gets a head start. But when he kills his first pursuer they are really pissed and are no longer playing games. He runs and runs and runs. And fights. And runs and fights some more. This goes on for days.

You know how when watching thrillers everyone yells at the movie in disgust when the feeble good guys don't pick up the villain's gun? Not a problem here. He takes everything they've got. The spears are particularly impressive: like steel broadswords with throwing handles.

Wilde was 54 years old and still impressively buff. He was ill but wouldn't stop production. During the segment when he's supposed to be naked we can see he's wearing flesh-colored briefs.

Exciting African drumming music throughout. Impressive widescreen vistas of the plains.

The Africans in pursuit are all well drawn individuals and show a range of emotions and character, which is unusual in this type of story. They are obviously unhappy that their leader (Ken Gampu) has become obsessed with this chase. They aren't actually villains: the white people have trespassed and now quite properly have to pay. But: you'd think the warriors would know not to step on twigs that make snapping noises at the wrong moment: Mark Twain zinged J. Fenimore Cooper for that one.

A lot of real hunting: elephants shot and butchered, deer stabbed, and also wildlife fighting, killing and devouring each other. This aspect reminds me of Walkabout, although that story is somewhat reversed: the European kids find aid and friendship in the wilderness.

Wilde does have one tender encounter: he rescues a girl from slavers and she saves him later. This is verging on cute but she soon wisely takes off on her own. Both the slave raid and the "we'll give you a head start" motifs were reused in Gibson's Apocalypto.

The story is said to be based on Colter's Run, relocated from the American Plains to southern Africa.

Criterion DVD. The commentary track has quite a lot on race relations and the film's combination of traditional Dark Continent fantasies with new thinking about dignity and respect for non-white people. Wilde receives praise as an innovative director.
Added thumbnails from the Criterion Blu-ray.



-Bill
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Alice's Restaurant (1969), directed by Arthur Penn.

Quote:
Q: What did you get, kid?

A: I didn't get nothing. I had to pay $50 and pick up the garbage.
I saw this about 30 years ago and remembered little about it, apart from the "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" comedy portion I knew earlier as a separate story. I wanted to revisit it because I just learned it is a tradition at some radio stations to put the album on as a loop and send the staff home on Thanksgiving Day. And people tune in and listen to it all day.

Without a traditional plot arc, it is a look at the authentic country hippie of the 1960s: back to the land, lots of babies, playing folk and country and blues music, fascinated with Victorian regalia and Art Nouveau. Taking in the lost and straying, easy going in matters of sex and drugs (alcohol and grass, at least).

Their Eden barely gets started; as always, they bring their serpents with them.

The core is based on the true story of Arlo Guthrie's arrest for littering and later adventures at his Draft Board physical, elaborated to comical effect for his first album.

Made mostly with non-actors and locals from the real location. Police Officer "Obie" and the Judge play themselves, which is sporting of them. Pete Seeger also appears and sings. Spot M. Emmet Walsh in his first credited role as the incomprehensible recruiting sergeant.

Despite the patchwork composition we have quite a lot going on. Decommissioning the church and selling it to Alice and Ray illustrates a passing of a world age: the old giving way to the young, traditional religion replaced by seekers who party all the time, work some of the time. Meditations on health and illness when Arlo visits his father Woody in the hospital. The other young people just can't comprehend how Arlo might have Huntington's Disease, a genetic disorder revealed only with time.

It drags a bit in the soap opera jealousy segments and we have a little subplot of a troubled junkie trying to get clean but failing. His moving funeral scene brings us to...

The Mystery of Tigger Outlaw

I had the soundtrack album before I saw the movie and when I heard "Songs to Aging Children Come" I thought: that is Joni Mitchell.

Here is the clip from the film:


The song credit was to "Tigger Outlaw" and for the longest time I figured that was some sort of joke pseudonym for Mitchell, never admitted. Like the prolific "Kilgore Trout", invented by Kurt Vonnegut as a play on Theodore Sturgeon and used as a pen-name by Philip José Farmer.

Now: Mitchell did write the song and it appears on her album Clouds. She was invited to appear in the movie and perform it but could not work out royalty issues. Tigger Outlaw is said to be married to Geoff Outlaw, long time friend of Arlo, who appears in this film, his only credit in the IMDB. And this must be Tigger singing, although she has no IMDB credits at all:



Although it is performed "Joni Mitchell"-style, Mitchell had a fuller voice and I guess this really is the mysterious Mrs Outlaw. And on the soundtrack album? I don't have it anymore.

Available on Blu-ray from Olive Films. Prominent grain and occasional damage. At 1h50m it may be a longer cut than I saw decades ago. No subtitles, but I found a good track online.



-Bill
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