Optoma GT1080 vs BenQ W1080ST and W1085ST - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 27 Old 09-03-2014, 09:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Optoma GT1080 vs BenQ W1080ST and W1085ST

Hello,

I'm trying to figure out the differences between the cheap short-throw 1080p projectors. Right now, I have a GT750, and I also have 4 sets of RF 3D glasses for it. If I switched to the BenQ, I'd have to get different glasses (and mine would become useless at that point), so I'm attempting to figure out if the additional cost of the BenQ projectors (and getting different glasses) would be worth it.

I'll list what I think are the big differences between the models, but if I'm missing something obvious, could someone point it out? Thanks!

Optoma GT1080
  • Brightest at 2800 lumens
  • VESA 3D sync port for RF glasses
  • 0.5:1 short throw ratio
  • No Zoom (no optical, digital is 0.8-2.0)
  • Keystone correction: Vertical Only
  • No lens shift
  • 2X speed color wheel

BenQ W1080ST
  • 2000 lumens
  • DLP link glasses
  • 0.69:1 to 0.83:1 short throw ratio
  • 1.2:1 optical zoom
  • Keystone correction: Vertical Only
  • No lens shift
  • 3X speed color wheel

BenQ HT1085ST - same as W1080ST above except:
  • 2200 lumens
  • Keystone correction: Vertical and Horizontal
  • Vertical lens shift
  • 6X speed color wheel

To me, it really seems like the big differences between the three projectors are the speed of the color wheel, brightness, and how flexible the placement is (keystone/zoom/lens shift).

Am I missing any other big differences (I omitted price here on purpose) between these projectors? For example, is the image quality of the BenQ way better than that of the Optoma? Anything else?
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post #2 of 27 Old 09-03-2014, 12:50 PM
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Because your old gt750 also used a 2X colorwheel, if you never had rainbow issues with that, the wheel speeds won't be a big issue..though it's my understanding that both Benq's are capable of 6x speed.

Both benq's use RGBRGB hometheater style colorwheels while both your old and the new Optoma listed use business style RGBCYW colorwheels.
What this ultimately means is those Optoma's will have extra bright whites but much dimmer and unbalanced colors as well as less full-color contrast. The color accuracy can be greatly improved by turning brilliantcolor down, but that also balances white brightness down to the level of its dim colors..so the image becomes balanced but darker.
Leaving brilliantcolor up also adds a grainy-looking video-noise that those Benq's don't have.
Being able to use your old glasses and emitter will save some money and time.

Those RGB Benq's will have roughly twice the full-color brightness and contrast, and also have nearly perfect colors right out of the box. They have less video-noise too.
You'll have to get new glasses, but there are solid performing ones like the G15's that are under $12 each.
The Benq being brighter (in actual measurements) comes with the downfall of running slightly louder. It's not a huge difference, but it IS noticeable enough to consider if you happen to be easily bothered by the fan drone.
If the 1080st is cheaper than the 1085st, don't bother with the 1085..it pretty much adds nothing.

If the 1080st is within close price distance of the gt1080, I'd suggest going for the better picture quality of the Benq.
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post #3 of 27 Old 09-03-2014, 02:11 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ftoast View Post
Because your old gt750 also used a 2X colorwheel, if you never had rainbow issues with that, the wheel speeds won't be a big issue..though it's my understanding that both Benq's are capable of 6x speed.

Both benq's use RGBRGB hometheater style colorwheels while both your old and the new Optoma listed use business style RGBCYW colorwheels.
What this ultimately means is those Optoma's will have extra bright whites but much dimmer and unbalanced colors as well as less full-color contrast. The color accuracy can be greatly improved by turning brilliantcolor down, but that also balances white brightness down to the level of its dim colors..so the image becomes balanced but darker.
Leaving brilliantcolor up also adds a grainy-looking video-noise that those Benq's don't have.
Being able to use your old glasses and emitter will save some money and time.

Those RGB Benq's will have roughly twice the full-color brightness and contrast, and also have nearly perfect colors right out of the box. They have less video-noise too.
You'll have to get new glasses, but there are solid performing ones like the G15's that are under $12 each.
The Benq being brighter (in actual measurements) comes with the downfall of running slightly louder. It's not a huge difference, but it IS noticeable enough to consider if you happen to be easily bothered by the fan drone.
If the 1080st is cheaper than the 1085st, don't bother with the 1085..it pretty much adds nothing.

If the 1080st is within close price distance of the gt1080, I'd suggest going for the better picture quality of the Benq.
Wow, I didn't realize that the glasses were only $12 each for the BenQ. I think I spent around $100 each for the Optoma RF glasses.

From reading your post, it would seem that the Optoma doesn't really have any advantages over the BenQ (other than price). I guess I need to wait and see what the release of the HT1085ST does to the W1080ST prices.

Thanks!
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post #4 of 27 Old 09-03-2014, 02:46 PM
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The Optoma's do have a couple advantages, but they aren't terribly major unless they really matter to you:
The dimmer, lower wattage lamp means the Optoma's can and do run more quietly (less required cooling) AND if it ever comes time to replace a lamp, the Optoma lamps run about $60-80 cheaper.

If your old Optoma was plenty quiet and you think you can handle a slightly louder projector, the noise shouldn't be an issue.
If you used your old Optoma for years without needing a new lamp, the price difference won't be an issue (they also last a very long time).

The RF glasses and emitter combo usually offer higher brightness and contrast over DLP-link like the Benq uses.. However, the Benq having twice the full-color brightness and contrast carries over to 3D as well, so you can afford to lose even twice as much and still end up tied.

If the 1080st has already dropped to around $800-850, I wouldn't expect it to get any lower. It MIGHT however get discontinued (getting replaced afterall) and become harder to find/buy.

Sadly the non-RGB models (like those Optoma short-throws) tend to have better looking specs on paper even though they actually measure much worse in real-life..so the similarly priced better models too often get looked over.

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post #5 of 27 Old 09-23-2014, 02:42 PM
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Optoma GT1080 vs BenQ W1080ST and W1085ST

First published hands-on review of the GT1080/GT1070X is up at projection-homecinema.fr:
http://www.projection-homecinema.fr/...optoma-gt1080/

Google translate:
https://translate.googleusercontent....optoma-gt1080/

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post #6 of 27 Old 09-25-2014, 07:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kreeturez View Post
First published hands-on review of the GT1080/GT1070X is up at projection-homecinema.fr:
http://www.projection-homecinema.fr/...optoma-gt1080/

Google translate:
https://translate.googleusercontent....optoma-gt1080/

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Yikes ! Only 810 lumens ? Judder problems ? That is not a very favorable review at all.

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post #7 of 27 Old 09-25-2014, 10:32 PM
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I think the judder mentioned wasn't meant as a problem, only that it doesn't have frame-interpolation to "soap opera" away the natural judder of 24fps.

The low brightness and low contrast are exactly what anyone looking at a non-RGB projector should expect. It can only use about half the colorwheel for non-office/non-black&white contents. You can have good contrast+brightness or you can have good colors, but you can't have both.
Or you can hunt down an rgbrgb model (like the w1080/1085) and have all at once.

Weird that such a low wattage model is said to be on the louder side though.
Glad to hear about multiple saveable settings.

Maybe Optoma will eventually release an RGB short-throw so they can finally compete against Benq on that front as well.

That 810lumen/780:1CR for this Optoma was measured with brilliantcolor at 2. That'll drop closer to 680lumens/700:1CR if they dropped BC to 1 for most accurate color-balance.
Of course if color-accuracy can be thrown to the wind, you could easily reach ~1600+white-lumens and nearly 2000:1 B&W contrast (deep colors won't get any brighter or higher contrast, but that's just how it is).
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post #8 of 27 Old 09-26-2014, 12:54 AM
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I expected the GT1080 to be essentially a short throw version of the HD131xe and its siblings.

The HD131xe measured 1600 lumen, but that is because Feierman doesn't shut down brilliant color. He toned down cartoonish colors but left brilliant color feature at 10, I assume because he figures people buying a 2500 lumen claimed projector for $650 are no more picky about accurate color than the typical TV buyer. I thought it was bad enough to go from a claimed 2500 to 1600 for a 'watchable' image. He warns in his review that turning brilliant color down to 1 cuts total lumen in half to 750 and he liked it best for movies at about 5 and 1150. I don't mind having a difference between 1600 for TV watching dynamic and 1150 for a more cinema mode. It is the 2500 claimed vs 1600 measured even in brightest dynamic mode discrepancy that really bothers me.

I just can't get over this practice of exaggerating brightness. This is like an automobile manufacturer claiming 40mpg and the car only getting 25mpg. It is unacceptable. My JVC claimed 700 and, calibrated, it measured 700. Going from a $4K projector to a $1K projector shouldn't mean being lied to is acceptable. (The W1070 only falls 15% short, not 40%, which is why I'll probably end up with one if my JVC finally dies. Choose the projector that lies to you least ? That's a hell of a basis for buying any product.)

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post #9 of 27 Old 09-26-2014, 01:29 AM
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I was in Fry's Electronics yesterday (now) afternoon, and discovered their home theater setup was running a W1070! Even with the lights on (though dim), the picture projected was totally watchable--that little guy definitely throws a lot of lumens! More importantly, I couldn't see any RBE (although there wasn't enough brightness in the image to really force it, IMHO) and the colors were awesome! (There was too much light to judge the blacks, which were washed out.) Turning around, I could see the colors from the wheel looking into the edge of light cone as well as the lamp shining out of the front exhaust vent (though the room was too bright to see a spot from it). I was confused for the longest time whether it was the 1070 or 1080ST, but now I'm sure it's the former.

Combined with the far larger amount of inputs and the bad French review of the GT1080, I think that cinches it for the BenQ's. FYI, Fry's has the W1080ST for $929 right now, which is the lowest price I'm seeing online from the big, legitimate sellers, though buying from them means paying sales tax.

Thanks for this thread!

Mike
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post #10 of 27 Old 09-26-2014, 04:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamer View Post
I just can't get over this practice of exaggerating brightness. This is like an automobile manufacturer claiming 40mpg and the car only getting 25mpg. It is unacceptable. My JVC claimed 700 and, calibrated, it measured 700. Going from a $4K projector to a $1K projector shouldn't mean being lied to is acceptable. (The W1070 only falls 15% short, not 40%, which is why I'll probably end up with one if my JVC finally dies. Choose the projector that lies to you least ? That's a hell of a basis for buying any product.)
Off topic I know, but that's part of why I like Aaxa as an LED brand. Their brightest models claim 450-500lumens..and make it ~90% there. They claim 2000:1 contrast, and make it ~50%-60%. When's the last time you saw a display make even 20% of its claimed contrast? Then again they left DLPlink 3D out of everything for no good reason.
But yeah, Optoma could drop an RGBRGB colorwheel into that gt1080 and have a solid machine..instead they chose what they chose because it saved $0. Why? who knows..I think Optoma and BenQ are the only DLP sellers under $3000 that are still using rgb wheels at all..the other cheap manufacturers have all gone to the dark side.

Easy $25 DIY black (or any color) ALR paint +$40-$50sprayer screen mix smooth/clean and very easy to learn spraying with little/no mess.
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post #11 of 27 Old 09-27-2014, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fstanek View Post
Hello,

I'm trying to figure out the differences between the cheap short-throw 1080p projectors. Right now, I have a GT750, and I also have 4 sets of RF 3D glasses for it. If I switched to the BenQ, I'd have to get different glasses (and mine would become useless at that point), so I'm attempting to figure out if the additional cost of the BenQ projectors (and getting different glasses) would be worth it.

I'll list what I think are the big differences between the models, but if I'm missing something obvious, could someone point it out? Thanks!

Optoma GT1080
  • Brightest at 2800 lumens
  • VESA 3D sync port for RF glasses
  • 0.5:1 short throw ratio
  • No Zoom (no optical, digital is 0.8-2.0)
  • Keystone correction: Vertical Only
  • No lens shift
  • 2X speed color wheel

BenQ W1080ST
  • 2000 lumens
  • DLP link glasses
  • 0.69:1 to 0.83:1 short throw ratio
  • 1.2:1 optical zoom
  • Keystone correction: Vertical Only
  • No lens shift
  • 3X speed color wheel

BenQ HT1085ST - same as W1080ST above except:
  • 2200 lumens
  • Keystone correction: Vertical and Horizontal
  • Vertical lens shift
  • 6X speed color wheel

To me, it really seems like the big differences between the three projectors are the speed of the color wheel, brightness, and how flexible the placement is (keystone/zoom/lens shift).

Am I missing any other big differences (I omitted price here on purpose) between these projectors? For example, is the image quality of the BenQ way better than that of the Optoma? Anything else?
The other differences in the Benq HT1085 over the Benq ST1080 is built in MHL compatability, and add on wireless capability. I believe the color wheel speed is unchanged, and the lumen difference if it exists at all will be imperceptible. The only thing I would say is of real benefit for most people is the vertical lens shift and perhaps horizontal keystone correction if you are not using it in a fixed location.
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post #12 of 27 Old 09-27-2014, 08:10 AM
 
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BenQ all the way. I wish I had frame interpolation in 3D though, doesn't the 1085 have that? I have the 1070. Wireless HDMI would be pretty nifty for my cell phone, but IMO it's pretty much a gimmicky feature I think. I'm totally sure you could find some people who'd swear by it, for the convenience especially to show off to guests.
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post #13 of 27 Old 09-28-2014, 05:25 PM
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Optoma GT1080 vs BenQ W1080ST and W1085ST

Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamer View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by kreeturez View Post
First published hands-on review of the GT1080/GT1070X is up at projection-homecinema.fr:
http://www.projection-homecinema.fr/...optoma-gt1080/

Google translate:
https://translate.googleusercontent....optoma-gt1080/


Yikes ! Only 810 lumens ? Judder problems ? That is not a very favorable review at all.

It isn't, unfortunately. The scenario isn't much better with Optoma's latest longer-throw budget option (the HD26; with it's first hands-on review at http://www.avforums.com/review/optom...r-review.10726 ); which again, as expected, loses out significantly in the color-accuracy (as well as RBE) departments due to its color-wheel.

But at least in the case of the longer-throw variants, Optoma's also offering the more-expensive HD50 (with initial reviews looking pretty solid) which does do a pretty good job at color due to a proper RGBRGB wheel. Likewise the upcoming HD36 also looks set to be a nice unit for a similar reason.

But in short-throw territory, there's currently just one option (the W1080ST - and its successor) that'll appease those looking for color accuracy (and those who are RBE-sensitive) on a budget. It certainly is a good unit - and it's pretty well-priced: but competition in any industry is important and it's a pity that this particular Optoma model doesn't really compete.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RLBURNSIDE View Post
BenQ all the way. I wish I had frame interpolation in 3D though, doesn't the 1085 have that? I have the 1070.

The BenQ HT1085 doesn't; though the longer-throw Optoma HD50 does - at a price premium. I don't see any short-throw budget options at present that offer FI; maybe Optoma has something in the pipeline (a short-throw HD50 variant perhaps?) to address this.

But yeah I'd have to agree with you: right now, buyers needing short-throw on a budget should probably stick to the W1080ST.

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post #14 of 27 Old 12-17-2014, 09:49 AM
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Hi, you seem to know a lot about these projectors... I have just a few questions about the projectors in this topic. I currently own the w1080st and I really love it, but I have heard people on Amazon really praising the gt1080 and it's capabilities... one reviewer even said that his roommate has the w1080st but he thinks the gt1080 is better, especially in 3D. But from what I have read on your comments thus far, the w1080st seems superior (although I see that the gt1080 is about $200.00 cheaper despite having a higher contrast ratio and lumens, and was wondering how Optoma pulled that off? but I'm guessing that it's because of the 2X wheel speed...) Well anyway... my questions are, how is the rainbows, blacks and overall image quality of the gt1080 compared to the w1080st? (especially the rainbows, because I see a few on the w1080st and they don't bother me too much, but many reviewers say that the gt1080 has very little rainbow effect for a dlp projector... so I'd like to know if it's less than the w1080st and also if it is, is the reason due to the smaller color wheel?) Also I would like to know if you think it would make sense to buy a gt1080 if one already has a w1080st?

P.s. As a final and additional question... I also find that my eyes get weary much faster when watching 3D content... but I'd like to know if the VESA 3D (which I heard has more brightness and contrast than the dlp) is any easier on the eyes than the DLP Link glasses as far as "weariness" goes? Would appreciate any help I can get on these matters,
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post #15 of 27 Old 12-17-2014, 01:54 PM
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Optoma GT1080 vs BenQ W1080ST and W1085ST

The W1080 offers a 5-6x color wheel (the same as the W1070). Since rainbow visibility is inversely proportional to wheel speed (ie, higher speed yields less RBE), the W1080 has a significant advantage here over the GT1080's much-slower 2-3x wheel.

As for contrast: manufacturer-supplied contrast ratios are unregulated and thus usually severely inflated. Both projectors offer in the ballpark of 1500:1 contrast ratio in real-world measurements. A far cry from either manufacturer's claim.

As for brightness: the W1080 is brighter in its more color-accurate modes; whereas the GT1080 should be brighter in its less color-accurate modes (once again, due to the color wheel). Technically, that means the W1080 has a color-brightness advantage.

As for black levels: the GT1080 has an advantage. Neither is amazing in this department, though.

As for 3D: VESA 3D is superior because it doesn't rob the image of as much contrast when compared to DLP-Link. VESA requires the separate purchase of an emitter.
However, in 3D, both projectors offer the same triple-flash (144hz) sync-rate; which means eye fatigue in 3D compared to 2D (when played from a 24hz source, such as a bluray) should be reasonably low for both projectors.
That said, viewing 3D on an active display such as these projectors (and arguably even on passive displays) is always much more fatiguing than watching 2D.

As for eye strain in general: the W1080 has an advantage since faster color wheels produce less visible color break-up on high-contrast scenes, which makes viewing less fatiguing on the eyes to those who suffer from eye strain/RBE-sensitivity.

All in all, then, moving from your W1080 to a GT1080 wouldn't really be an upgrade.


If you're battling with eye strain, you might try dimming your projector (ECO mode - and/or turning BrilliantColor to 'off'); or viewing it in some ambient light. If you're running a large screen (and/or sitting close), you might also find you experience less fatigue if you drop the size a bit (since your eyes have to do less darting around the screen when it's smaller).
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post #16 of 27 Old 12-17-2014, 03:10 PM
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It might also be worth your while to check out the w1070 3D glasses thread and see if there's a general glasses suggestion that folks find least tiring.
If nothing else, the Estar glasses get high praise, so trying a pair could help.
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Simple $25-40 DIY black/dark-grey ambient-light rejecting screen, grab two things from a local store..mix..roll..done.
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post #17 of 27 Old 12-18-2014, 08:15 AM
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Thanks for all the information and tips! But I have just a few more questions regarding your post... I understand what you're saying about the higher speed color wheels having less RBE... but my question is... is there any other factor on a projector that can cause RBE besides the color wheel? (Reason I'm asking this question is because the only other projector I've owned was a viewsonic PJD5133... I bought this before the w1080st, it had an 800 x 600 res and it cost about $350.00... so I would expect that it had a slow color wheel. The point is when I used this projector this was before I knew anything about RBE, so I would've never looked for it... but if my memory serves me correctly, I don't ever remember seeing any rainbows on it really. But I did my research before I bought the w1080st... so I was really looking out for them, and I saw them... so I always thought that there may be another factor that affects RBE.) Also... about the black levels... you were saying that the optoma has the advantage in that area, while both projectors don't impress in this area generally. But I would still like to know why the optoma has the advantage in this area? (I was thinking it must be the contrast level... but you said both of them would be approximately around the same figure right.)
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post #18 of 27 Old 12-18-2014, 08:46 AM
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I think this is the reason:

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Originally Posted by cbudz View Post
Reason I'm asking this question is because the only other projector I've owned was a viewsonic PJD5133... The point is when I used this projector this was before I knew anything about RBE, so I would've never looked for it

In all likelihood? Ignorance is bliss. Before you researched, you didn't know what it was and thus didn't notice it.

In fact it looks like that Viewsonic - intended for use in data presentations rather than video - used only a 2x color wheel; and one of the only professional reviews on that model explicitly bemoans RBE:

Quote:
The PJD5133's video quality is suitable for short clips as part of a presentation. The main issue I encountered was the rainbow effect, a common artifact in DLP projectors in which people sensitive to the effect see little red-green-blue flashes in still or moving images, most often in bright areas against dark backgrounds. I'd noticed it in data images that tend to bring the effect out, but it was more pronounced in video, a little more apparent than is typical in a DLP data projector. People who are sensitive to it will likely be distracted by it, so it's best to stick to shorter videos with this projector.

As for black levels: the advantage is small enough such that it doesn't have a large resulting effect on contrast ratio. It's mainly due to the use of a dimmer lamp in the Optoma: 190W (vs 240W on the BenQ). The dimmer lamp means less calibrated color-brightness as well lower black levels to go with it (check Kraine's review more detail), which is why calibrated contrast ratio is similar between the two.


The last thing that comes to mind with regards to rainbows: color-wheel speed is dependent on input refresh-rate. The BenQ, for instance, runs at a lower color-wheel speed at 24Hz than either 60Hz or 50Hz (with 50Hz being the fastest). So if you're connected to a PC or even Bluray player, adjusting it to 60Hz or (even better) 50Hz output will help somewhat as well. On Bluray players, it's often a setting described as '24p mode' or the like: switching it off bumps up output refresh rate from 24Hz to 60Hz, speeding the wheel up.
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post #19 of 27 Old 12-18-2014, 01:00 PM
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Thanks again... I understand what you mean about the fact that I never looked out for RBE at the time means I wouldn't have seen them... but I just assumed that the reason some people complained about it was because they noticed them without even knowing about it in the 1st place. Also when some reviewers keep talking about how particular projectors keep the RBE to a minimum they give the impression that they have reviewed other projectors of similar specs that have never been able to achieve that... so I had to ask. I Still have two more questions though... that tip you gave about running the refresh rate at 50hz sounds useful, but I'd like to know why 50hz runs the wheel faster than 60hz? Also in the earlier post you mentioned that running 3D in 24hz is less tiring on the eyes than 50/60hz... but if I'm watching 3D in 24hz will the color wheel still run at a lower speed?
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post #20 of 27 Old 12-18-2014, 01:10 PM
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Optoma GT1080 vs BenQ W1080ST and W1085ST

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Originally Posted by cbudz View Post
I Still have two more questions though... that tip you gave about running the refresh rate at 50hz sounds useful, but I'd like to know why 50hz runs the wheel faster than 60hz? Also in the earlier post you mentioned that running 3D in 24hz is less tiring on the eyes than 50/60hz... but if I'm watching 3D in 24hz will the color wheel still run at a lower speed?

Excellent question. The answer isn't all that logical, though.

Color wheel speed in [email protected] is almost as fast as in [email protected]; so this coupled with the fastest available glasses-sync rate (144Hz) means 3D with a 24Hz source is least fatiguing of all: you're getting both 6x wheel speed and as-fast-as-a-movie-theatre glasses sync.

As for why 60Hz should yield a slower rate than 50Hz? I can't conclusively explain it. But what boggles my mind even more is why 24Hz input in 2D should be so much slower than it is in 3D; or even than 60Hz/50Hz in 2D (weird engineering decision if you ask me!)

See my massively-off-topic, overly-mathematical rant about this here:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/68-dig...l#post24472711

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post #21 of 27 Old 01-21-2015, 05:36 AM
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anyone know which one would be better for gaming? Optoma GT1080 or BenQ ht1085ST? I have been trying to compare these two projectors for a long time but I still haven't figured out which one to go for. I am concerned that the BenQ would not have fast enough response times as the Optoma GT1080 which was advertised to be a gaming projector. And are the RBE between the two really that huge of a difference? I know it should be by color wheel speed/specs wise, but in practical use, are they noticably different?
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post #22 of 27 Old 01-21-2015, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by renegadeavenger View Post
I am concerned that the BenQ would not have fast enough response times as the Optoma GT1080 which was advertised to be a gaming projector. And are the RBE between the two really that huge of a difference? I know it should be by color wheel speed/specs wise, but in practical use, are they noticably different?

You could be right. The HT1085/HT1075 tend to be measured at around 50ms or so.

The older W1070/W1080 measures a better 20-30ms or so. ProjectorCentral measured a similar figure for the GT1080.

In your position (particularly if you're RBE sensitive - the wheel speed makes a huge difference here), I'd lean towards the W1080ST, then.

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post #23 of 27 Old 01-21-2015, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kreeturez View Post
You could be right. The HT1085/HT1075 tend to be measured at around 50ms or so.

The older W1070/W1080 measures a better 20-30ms or so. ProjectorCentral measured a similar figure for the GT1080.

In your position (particularly if you're RBE sensitive - the wheel speed makes a huge difference here), I'd lean towards the W1080ST, then.
wow, didn't know that the HT1085ST was worse on the response times... Will have to check back at W1080 too then.
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post #24 of 27 Old 02-13-2015, 02:39 PM
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Does anyone know the input lag measurements for Benq HT1085ST?
unfortunately, i'm found only HT1085 input lag numbers on PJC site.
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post #25 of 27 Old 08-08-2015, 09:30 PM
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Just tested out the Optoma 1080 and BenQ 1085. I'm returning the Optoma.

The BenQ just looked better overall colorwise, brightness and contrast. The Optoma seemed to get colors "right" when in Reference mode. Once you start messing with brightness/contrast and other basic color options, colors started getting weird looking. Almost like pink skin, blown out whites and just didn't look right.

The Benq looked good right out of the box. Colors looks good even when messing with brightness and contrast. Noticed a difference when on the homescreen of the PS4. Optoma felt a little washed out compared to the more colorful reproduction of the BenQ.

Also, as of now I have the projectors either on the floor or table and I need to use keystone adjustment for both the Optoma and Benq. I noticed that the edges of the picture had a slight jaggedness to them on the Optomo while the Benq's edges were sharp.

Due to only vertical keystone adjustment on the Optoma you're limited to placement as opposed to the Benq that I can have off to the side a little more.

The only thing is I have to mount the projector in front of my ceiling fan in my living room and the Optoma I think would produce a larger image than the BenQ at the same distance.

Playing Battlefield 4 on both projectors, i didn't notice any difference with lag.

Another thing I liked on the BenQ is the powered USB port. I can plug the Chromecast's USB cable into the USB port of the BenQ and it powers the Chromecast. No powered USB on the Optoma so you have to plug your streaming stick into a wall or strip.

I'd spend the extra $200 for the BenQ1085 just for the better color reproduction/quality, Powered USB for a streaming stick and keystone adjustments.

Last edited by vice86; 08-08-2015 at 09:34 PM.
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post #26 of 27 Old 04-18-2016, 10:48 PM
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The BenQ HT1085ST Has no Lens shift Feature. First post so can't attach Pic, but look up the manual on ProjectorCentral.com

Please change the info, as people that read this are being mislead!

Thanks.
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post #27 of 27 Old 04-19-2016, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzniak View Post
The BenQ HT1085ST Has no Lens shift Feature. First post so can't attach Pic, but look up the manual on ProjectorCentral.com

Please change the info, as people that read this are being mislead!
You're right; the first post is incorrect.


The post directly above yours is referring to the BenQ HT1085ST having both horizontal and vertical keystone. The older model (W1080) - and it appears the Optoma GT1080 - both have only vertical keystone (no horizontal keystone). Not that keystone is an ideal solution of course, since it degrades image quality somewhat.


I'm not aware of any short-throw projectors in this price bracket that offer full lens shift (probably due to the short throw optics being more complicated than typical longer-throw lenses).
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