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post #1 of 37 Old 03-23-2017, 07:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Yet another first projector question

Hi, Sorry about starting a new thread ... Yes, I did read the other threads asking for advice on a new projector.

1. My AV experience: Not an Audio/Video phile: Current TV is a 46" Sony 1080P LCD TV, about 10 years old. It is in the living room and my normal viewing distance is 11' to 14'. Audio is a 20 year old Sony receiver (5 speaker surround sound) set up. That is the largest (size wise) TV I have ever owned. No 3D experience.

2. What we view: Movies (60%), Sports (40%). My son (teenager) plays games on the same TV - but only when school is off (i.e. summer break). Almost all viewing these days is streamed content (Vudu, Netflix, Amazon Video, Sling), over a Roku 3. Occasionally I do rent BD. My son has Xbox One, PS3, Nintendo WiiU. Most of my personal movie collection is DVD with some BD.

3. The plan: I would like to try a projector in the upstairs landing area/room. It is a fairly large area meant as a gaming/pool room (23' X 15'). I would like to try the projector with minimum investment in any modification of the room - i.e. start off with bits and pieces and build on it if I like it. The image size I can project is about 126" diagonal (110"W X 62"H), viewing distance 12'-14'. Light control DOES NOT exist. There is a large/long window (pretty much runs along the 23' side of the room and about 5' tall) and the other side of the wall is the barrister to the stairs - i.e. open. So late evening/night viewing is my goal ... movies mostly and would like to try 3D.

- Start with the projector (project on wall to start with, table mounted)
- Add a screen
- Add sound system
- Try some options for light control

4. Budget: No particular limit (below $3k for sure). I would hate the idea of having invested in a nice projector, but not using it because I didn't like the experience. At the same time, I don't want to skimp on spending a decent amount and losing out on the experience. I would like to try out a decent projector.

5. Choices I am torn about:

- I can go low end, and I am torn between Benq HT2050 (about ~$799) and the Epson 3700 ($1300). I don't know if I will be affected by the DLP rainbow effect yet, and not sure if I'll need the high lumens of the Epson (if I am viewing movies at night mostly). However, I do like the idea of the Epson allowing me to experiment viewing with higher ambient light condition - perhaps a soccer/tennis/basketball game.

- Mid/higher end: Though I realize that projectors costing much more exist, I do see that the Sony 45ES is available at a discount at present ($1798), Epson 5040 ($2500), and a JVC 400 (B stock deal from AV Science) and these seem to be very highly regarded here. The latter I think is overkill for what I am trying to do, but the Sony is tempting for sure .... which is not much more than the Epson 3700.

Any thoughts or suggestions ?? Thanks and sorry for the long post.
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post #2 of 37 Old 03-23-2017, 07:44 PM
 
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Don't spend more than the 45ES if you can't treat the room or have light control. Saying you'll only watch late at night is all well and good but also very limiting and IMO you won't see the benefit of anything more expensive in your environment. Having said that a 45ES is a hell of a projector at that price point.

My room is smaller (18x14) but also opens on to the stairs. I have a rail attached to the ceiling and a floor length room dividing curtain to block light from that area and it stacks/ drapes neatly in a corner when not in use. I also have dark walls and ceiling a dark rug and blackout shades on all the windows. I wanted to be able to use the projector any time day or night.

You could always consider an ambient light rejecting screen but they are expensive and I still prefer watching movies in a cave...

Good luck with your theater.
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post #3 of 37 Old 03-23-2017, 08:22 PM
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My recommendation to first time projector users is go 1080p entry level with the BenQ 2050 at the top of the list. It's an excellent first choice unless you are building a dedicated home theater then the upper level projectors like the Sony, Epson 5040 and especially the JVC RS400/420 are better choices. As far as the RBE issue buy with a decent return policy and don't try to see rainbows just watch the picture as you can actually train your self to see them then you will always see them. Even if you keep it beyond the return window the resale is very good with only a $100 or so loss if you either decide to forget projection or love it so much have an itch to upgrade.

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post #4 of 37 Old 03-23-2017, 08:28 PM
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3100 is probably the best value for no light control.
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post #5 of 37 Old 03-23-2017, 08:34 PM
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You've pretty much named all the most recommended projectors at various price points. It's simply a matter of prioritizing which types of viewing are most important to you and picking the model that does best what you want most. For example, if you ever want to watch in the daytime with uncovered windows the 3700 is the best choice, but you may find that even it can't produce an image that's satisfying to you in a room full of windows. On the other hand the HW45ES will produce a better image at night in the dark but can't handle much ambient light with a big screen. Ideally if you ever want to have a good image day or night you'd need window coverings.

For a first projector if in doubt the HT2050 makes a lot of sense because it's very good for the price and leaves you cash in the bank for an upgrade in a couple of years if you decide to put a higher priority on front projection viewing. Going for a more expensive first projector without really knowing how much you will get into watching it can be risky.
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post #6 of 37 Old 03-24-2017, 12:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks folks - I appreciate your insight and I am going to go with entry level and see how it works out for me. That narrows it to two choices. One more question:

1. Benq HT2050: It is on Amazon for $770 ... I know I have to pay tax. There is a refurbished model for less, about $ 650. But the lamp prices are quite high ... ~$250.

2. Epson 2040: It is about $650 new with the refurbished 2045 model is about the same as well on Amazon. The lamp price on these are less ... ~ $75.

For my trial purposes, it seems like the Epson 2040 /45 would be the best bet?

Thanks
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post #7 of 37 Old 03-24-2017, 03:39 PM
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Unless you plan on viewing 8 hours a day, it's unlikely you should really take lamp price into consideration over image quality. The HT2050 is a better looking model.

I might throw out that you may want to consider the W1070 from BenQ which can be had for $500 right now as it is being closed out completely. This is very comparable to the HT2050.

You can get the image you want, you can see if you are RBE sensitive, you can get great gaming, sports, and the rest. Good 3D, etc.

If you don't like it or are RBE sensitive, or whatever, then you should have no issue selling it for $400 or so. You may also be able to purchase it from a place with a good return policy.

It's a heck of a deal right now, and leads you in nicely to one of the most entertaining ways to see movies that is possible.

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post #8 of 37 Old 03-24-2017, 05:58 PM
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As AV_Integrated says, do the math on replacement lamps. For example, estimated lamp life for the HT2050 in eco (low lamp) mode is 6,000 hours. If you watched 6 hours a day every day the original lamp will last 1,000 days or nearly 3 years. If you average 3 hours a day every single day it will last for more than 5 years. You may want to upgrade to a newer, higher performance projector before the lamp needs replacing.

Don't get me wrong. I really appreciate Epson's leadership in providing genuine OEM replacement lamps for a fraction of the cost of other projector companies. But unless you use your projector like a TV and have it on all the time it can make sense to go with a projector with more expensive replacement lamps that has other performance advantages.
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post #9 of 37 Old 03-24-2017, 07:20 PM - Thread Starter
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I was thinking along the lines of premature lamp failure - a couple if negative reviews I saw for the Benq 2050 alluded to this.

I hadn't paid attention to the W1070 before - the price is indeed very attractive. Thanks for the pointer - I am planning to buy from Amazon.

Update: Order placed for the W1070 ....

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post #10 of 37 Old 03-24-2017, 08:37 PM
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I wouldn't worry about premature lamp failures on any particular model. You tend to see more reports of lamp failures on more popular projectors simply because there are more of them out there. In reality the percentage is small for any single model.

The W1070 is a smart buy at the current price for a first projector. It's been well-proven over the years.
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post #11 of 37 Old 03-24-2017, 10:47 PM
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Ok speaking about lamp failures, would Laser DLP or LED projectors be a smart choice for home theatre?

around the same price range:

say a CasioXJ-V2 Vs. Benq TH670

Which would be better?

Also Casio says lamp free, is this to be taken literal? as in there is NO lamp to ever replace?

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post #12 of 37 Old 03-25-2017, 07:20 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Googi View Post
Ok speaking about lamp failures, would Laser DLP or LED projectors be a smart choice for home theatre?

around the same price range:

say a CasioXJ-V2 Vs. Benq TH670

Which would be better?

Also Casio says lamp free, is this to be taken literal? as in there is NO lamp to ever replace?
I don't think the Casio model is HD (1920 x 1080) capable.
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post #13 of 37 Old 03-25-2017, 07:44 AM
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Room placement will dictate whether you can use the BenQ2050, as it has no lens shift and a short throw. I own one and really like it, but an Epson 3100-3700 is a better home theater projector overall (that's why they cost more). If your placement allows it then the 2050 is a great deal since it's not worth spending thousands on a projector today until 4k catches up. All models have reports of early bulb failure, it's just the nature of the beast. An Epson 3100-3700 would be my first choice though.
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post #14 of 37 Old 03-25-2017, 10:25 AM
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@Googi , when they say "lamp free" they mean "traditional UHP lamp free." LED and laser are also considered to be lamps for the purpose of projector illumination. You can consider LED and laser projectors to be "lamp replacement free" because their illumination systems are not meant to be replaced when they die. They expect you to replace the whole projector at the end of the LED/laser life cycle.

The main issue with LED and laser is that the ones in the same price range as models with traditional UHP lamps are significantly dimmer. For the same level of brightness you need to move up to more expensive LED and laser models. So lower cost LED and laser projectors make the most sense for those whose viewing environment and preferences can tolerate lower lumens and a dimmer image than comparably priced UHP lamp models.
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post #15 of 37 Old 03-25-2017, 10:33 AM
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I just picked up the Epson 3700 yesterday. This too is my first projector and so far I am impressed. Out of the box the pic quality is better than expected, matter of fact, it is damn good. I have a Sammy 4K with over 100 UHD BD's and understand that this projector won't work with those but the BD's that I have sampled,,,are simply stellar. Plenty bright in eco mode, fan is absolutely silent and colors really pop. I'm projecting onto a simple 4x8 sheet of sanded plywood painted with HD silverscreen paint. Once this unit is calibrated I have no doubt I'll be enjoyinh it until a true 4k projector is priced for the working man.
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post #16 of 37 Old 03-25-2017, 12:47 PM
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Ok so these laser projectors are like electric cars. You don't have to fill them with gas, but at the end of the life cycle you have to replace the whole thing and it will end up being more expensive and harmful to the environment. Hmmm I'll stick to my benq then.

Secondly, buying an Epson as a first projector means you went for 3LCD. Back when I bought my first projector, DLP was superior. Is this the case these days?
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post #17 of 37 Old 03-26-2017, 07:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Googi View Post
Ok so these laser projectors are like electric cars. You don't have to fill them with gas, but at the end of the life cycle you have to replace the whole thing and it will end up being more expensive and harmful to the environment. Hmmm I'll stick to my benq then.

Secondly, buying an Epson as a first projector means you went for 3LCD. Back when I bought my first projector, DLP was superior. Is this the case these days?
There are different levels of LCD models out there, but at the entry level (under $1,000) DLP tends to have the best image. LCD is no slouch in quality, but typically can't hit the black levels of DLP for the money. Throw in an iris, and the LCD models start looking better. So, the 3700 is a nice model.

But, the big thing about the Epson 3700 is that the lens offers a ton of placement flexibility. It has a good deal of zoom range and a ton of lens shift. This is ideal for people with pesky room setups.

Kind of a headache, IMO, is that DLP hasn't advanced their chip in years and the chip in the DLP projectors today, is the same that was in there 5+ years ago. So the new HT2050 uses the exact same chip as the W1070, and many projectors for years before it. So, it has been a fairly stagnant technology.

LCD really advanced, especially with their better models, to deliver more at the upper mid end in their 3700, and still moreso in their $3,000 5040 model. But, LCoS reigns king for contrast. Sony delivers more native contrast than LCD or DLP can hope to deliver in the price range with their HW45ES around $2,000. Then the JVC models which are all over $3,000 just tend to trounce the rest with true native contrast above 20,000:1.

Anyway, DLP or LCD are both very solid with the edge generally going to DLP, and unless they are side by side, you are unlikely to really notice a tremendous difference between them. But, once you go to a good dedicated theater space, then I would strongly encourage LCoS as the projection system of choice.

As for laser drive projectors, they are likely the future. Casio doesn't build around home theater, so their stuff, while it has improved, is still not home theater worthy. There are discussions elsewhere of more home theater based models which, like flat panels, should last most people 10+ years and then be tossed. I expect you COULD send it in and have the light engine replaced, but by then, you would just toss it and get a new one. I'm not sure it's any more or less harmful to the environment than televisions or the lamps used in typical projectors really. There is certainly a premium at this point for those solid state light engines, except for the LED models which tend to be far too dim for most serous home theater setups. Nice for more casual enthusiasts. Look at the PF1500 from LG for a nice LED based model to read about.
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post #18 of 37 Old 03-26-2017, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated View Post
There are different levels of LCD models out there, but at the entry level (under $1,000) DLP tends to have the best image. LCD is no slouch in quality, but typically can't hit the black levels of DLP for the money. Throw in an iris, and the LCD models start looking better. So, the 3700 is a nice model.

But, the big thing about the Epson 3700 is that the lens offers a ton of placement flexibility. It has a good deal of zoom range and a ton of lens shift. This is ideal for people with pesky room setups.

Kind of a headache, IMO, is that DLP hasn't advanced their chip in years and the chip in the DLP projectors today, is the same that was in there 5+ years ago. So the new HT2050 uses the exact same chip as the W1070, and many projectors for years before it. So, it has been a fairly stagnant technology.

LCD really advanced, especially with their better models, to deliver more at the upper mid end in their 3700, and still moreso in their $3,000 5040 model. But, LCoS reigns king for contrast. Sony delivers more native contrast than LCD or DLP can hope to deliver in the price range with their HW45ES around $2,000. Then the JVC models which are all over $3,000 just tend to trounce the rest with true native contrast above 20,000:1.

Anyway, DLP or LCD are both very solid with the edge generally going to DLP, and unless they are side by side, you are unlikely to really notice a tremendous difference between them. But, once you go to a good dedicated theater space, then I would strongly encourage LCoS as the projection system of choice.

As for laser drive projectors, they are likely the future. Casio doesn't build around home theater, so their stuff, while it has improved, is still not home theater worthy. There are discussions elsewhere of more home theater based models which, like flat panels, should last most people 10+ years and then be tossed. I expect you COULD send it in and have the light engine replaced, but by then, you would just toss it and get a new one. I'm not sure it's any more or less harmful to the environment than televisions or the lamps used in typical projectors really. There is certainly a premium at this point for those solid state light engines, except for the LED models which tend to be far too dim for most serous home theater setups. Nice for more casual enthusiasts. Look at the PF1500 from LG for a nice LED based model to read about.
This really sums things up perfectly. To add to it, room treatment is far more important after something like a Sony hw45. Years ago I got a JVC RS40 and was very disappointed by the black level thinking they weren't any better than my DLP's. Then I treated the room with black velvet and the difference was beyond night and day. You would be surprised how much light bounces off even a dark colored wall. Also, I would stay away from SXRD for the time being. They still have major issues with contrast degradation. If I was you I would pick up an Epson 3700. You will appreciate the brightness and the native contrast ratio will be better than the DLP.
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post #19 of 37 Old 03-28-2017, 10:04 PM
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My recommendation to first time projector users is go 1080p entry level with the BenQ 2050 at the top of the list. It's an excellent first choice unless you are building a dedicated home theater then the upper level projectors like the Sony, Epson 5040 and especially the JVC RS400/420 are better choices. As far as the RBE issue buy with a decent return policy and don't try to see rainbows just watch the picture as you can actually train your self to see them then you will always see them. Even if you keep it beyond the return window the resale is very good with only a $100 or so loss if you either decide to forget projection or love it so much have an itch to upgrade.
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post #20 of 37 Old 03-29-2017, 12:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Googi View Post
Ok speaking about lamp failures, would Laser DLP or LED projectors be a smart choice for home theatre?

around the same price range:

say a CasioXJ-V2 Vs. Benq TH670

Which would be better?

Also Casio says lamp free, is this to be taken literal? as in there is NO lamp to ever replace?
We would all love to have bright LED projectors that really lasted at full brightness for 20,000 hours the way they claim. Unfortunately, being unable to replace the LED means that when it does finally fail, you must replace the entire projector. At my own 2,500 hours per year usage, such a projector would last me 8 years and I would then buy a newer model.

Unfortunately, there is no real-life proof of that 20,000 hours claim, and none of the LED models available comes anywhere close to providing the lumens they claim or being adequate for larger screens.

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post #21 of 37 Old 03-29-2017, 12:29 AM
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Quote:
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Ok so these laser projectors are like electric cars. You don't have to fill them with gas, but at the end of the life cycle you have to replace the whole thing and it will end up being more expensive and harmful to the environment. Hmmm I'll stick to my benq then.

Secondly, buying an Epson as a first projector means you went for 3LCD. Back when I bought my first projector, DLP was superior. Is this the case these days?
OT, but wherever did you get the idea that electric cars must be simply thrown away at the end of their any one component's life cycle ? Electric cars have battery packs that are entirely replaceable. The Tesla Model S had a plan to swap battery packs as an alternative to recharging them. In 3 minutes, a supercharger station could robotically swap out the entire 1,000 pound battery pack with a fully charged one. Although a battery pack might only have a 200,000 mile lifetime, there is nothing stopping an owner from replacing it with new ones for a vehicle lifetime of a million miles.


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post #22 of 37 Old 03-29-2017, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by *UFO* View Post
This really sums things up perfectly. To add to it, room treatment is far more important after something like a Sony hw45. Years ago I got a JVC RS40 and was very disappointed by the black level thinking they weren't any better than my DLP's. Then I treated the room with black velvet and the difference was beyond night and day. You would be surprised how much light bounces off even a dark colored wall. Also, I would stay away from SXRD for the time being. They still have major issues with contrast degradation. If I was you I would pick up an Epson 3700. You will appreciate the brightness and the native contrast ratio will be better than the DLP.


The issue with the panel degradation is the biggest reason I haven't jumped on the current sale on the 45ES.


One thing I would mention: according to Secrets the native contrast of the Epson 3700 is pretty much identical to the BenQ. The big difference is the Epson has that trick iris that can vastly improve dynamic contrast/black level.

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post #23 of 37 Old 03-29-2017, 08:08 PM - Thread Starter
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My order (Benq w1070) arrived from Amazon today. I just put it up and projected on to the wall (about 126" diagonal). Hooked up the Chromecast (early model, 1) and cast several videos to it, from You Tube, Netflix (watched the movie Minions). I tried to hook up my PS3, which hadn't been used in a while - only to discover that it won't power on at all. Really wanted to try the blu-ray. I will try it with the X-box One next time.

I didn't see any rainbows or maybe I was too immersed in what I was watching that I didn't look for them. I am happy so far.

It is quite an experience to watch on such a large area. My wall is textured and is off-white (very light yellow), so not the best for projection. I am hunting for a cheap(er) screen - I'll scout local Craigslist to see if someone is selling one locally. Is it something I can buy from forum members? I would imagine this to be somewhat difficult to ship.

PS: My apologies to those who sent me PMs - I couldn't respond to you as I don't have enough message count to respond.
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post #24 of 37 Old 03-30-2017, 10:43 AM
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We would all love to have bright LED projectors that really lasted at full brightness for 20,000 hours the way they claim. Unfortunately, being unable to replace the LED means that when it does finally fail, you must replace the entire projector. At my own 2,500 hours per year usage, such a projector would last me 8 years and I would then buy a newer model.

Unfortunately, there is no real-life proof of that 20,000 hours claim, and none of the LED models available comes anywhere close to providing the lumens they claim or being adequate for larger screens.
Amen on bright, affordable LED projectors. I hope they're a reality the next time I buy. As far as 20,000 hour LED life, some of the new Epson projectors are coming with UHP lamps estimated to last up to 10,000 hours in low lamp mode with replacement lamp costs of less than $100. So just one inexpensive lamp replacement to reach 20,000 hours. We all benefit from this kind of competition between UHP lamps and LEDs.
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post #25 of 37 Old 03-30-2017, 03:16 PM
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My order (Benq w1070) arrived from Amazon today. I just put it up and projected on to the wall (about 126" diagonal). Hooked up the Chromecast (early model, 1) and cast several videos to it, from You Tube, Netflix (watched the movie Minions). I tried to hook up my PS3, which hadn't been used in a while - only to discover that it won't power on at all. Really wanted to try the blu-ray. I will try it with the X-box One next time.

I didn't see any rainbows or maybe I was too immersed in what I was watching that I didn't look for them. I am happy so far.

It is quite an experience to watch on such a large area. My wall is textured and is off-white (very light yellow), so not the best for projection. I am hunting for a cheap(er) screen - I'll scout local Craigslist to see if someone is selling one locally. Is it something I can buy from forum members? I would imagine this to be somewhat difficult to ship.

PS: My apologies to those who sent me PMs - I couldn't respond to you as I don't have enough message count to respond.
don't look for rainbows, once you start seeing them you won't be able to stop seeing them
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post #26 of 37 Old 03-30-2017, 03:58 PM
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don't look for rainbows, once you start seeing them you won't be able to stop seeing them
I was just going to say this. The moment you go looking for them, they will appear constantly. I remember when I used to think people were crazy for seeing the RBE, and thought nothing of it until one day a forum member posted an image that simulated the effect. Since then its all I see when watching a single chip DLP.
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post #27 of 37 Old 03-30-2017, 05:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by dreamer View Post
We would all love to have bright LED projectors that really lasted at full brightness for 20,000 hours the way they claim. Unfortunately, being unable to replace the LED means that when it does finally fail, you must replace the entire projector. At my own 2,500 hours per year usage, such a projector would last me 8 years and I would then buy a newer model.

Unfortunately, there is no real-life proof of that 20,000 hours claim, and none of the LED models available comes anywhere close to providing the lumens they claim or being adequate for larger screens.
I think that goes for most projectors out there. It's hard to verify their claims on lumens and lamp hours because both usually fall short of expectations whether they're using lamp, laser (unproven) or LED (still testing). I do believe however that LED projectors have shown improvement over a short period of time and will continue to do so. Just remember lamp based projectors once had their humble beginnings as well. The advantages of LEDs are still very clear - they are designed to be brighter, use less energy and last much longer than conventional bulbs. That's why we are all using it for practically everything in TVs, light-emitting devices, houses, motor vehicles, airplanes etc. Everything.

Secondly, it's not true that the entire projector needs to be replaced if its LED bulb goes. Our expectations due to our ever changing requirements has a far shorter lifespan than any LED projector, so the point is kind of moot. I suppose some people may still be trying to resuscitate very old projectors from 8 or 10 years ago but they are very rare cases with probably very little support let alone spare parts available. Which would be the case for current projectors in 8 to 10 years time. There is simply no incentive to keep these projectors going with all the maintenance they require (ie. lamp/housing/fan replacements), and they aren't even expected to last that long which is why LED has more value here.

Also, LED components can be replaced just like traditional projectors. Sony's offer bulb and housing replacements on their own high end projectors, the costs however are very high as you can imagine. Technology, as we would expect, should improve costs and accessibility over time.
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post #28 of 37 Old 04-02-2017, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
Amen on bright, affordable LED projectors. I hope they're a reality the next time I buy. As far as 20,000 hour LED life, some of the new Epson projectors are coming with UHP lamps estimated to last up to 10,000 hours in low lamp mode with replacement lamp costs of less than $100. So just one inexpensive lamp replacement to reach 20,000 hours. We all benefit from this kind of competition between UHP lamps and LEDs.
Lamp estimates for UHP lamps are like contrast ratios, complete fabrications. If you trust the MFR contrast ratios, then by all means trust their lamp ratings. I've gotten 8,000 hours out of lamps rated 2000 hours. I've had lamps rated 5000 hours die at 250 hours.

Just like the fabricated contrast ratios, the general pattern has been for each MFR to keep increasing the lamp ratings, but the tech has not changed. The only difference is the MFR are more aware of being careful about having faulty lamps, but that doesn't change the actual amount of hours you can get out of a good working one.

Besides, unless you start out at 100fL, that lamp is going to be way too dim at 10,000 hours. 90% of the lamps I have to replace are because they are TOO DIM, not because they failed.

That said, it gets risky to run any lamp beyond 4000 hours, as your risk of the lamp exploding starts increasing exponentially, regardless of the rating. I'd say 5000 hours max and change the bulb or risk a kablooe...

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post #29 of 37 Old 04-07-2017, 03:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice, people. I am enjoying the Benq W1070. Still projecting on the wall ... and on the lookout for a screen ...
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post #30 of 37 Old 03-24-2018, 05:41 PM - Thread Starter
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I've been enjoying the projector for almost a year now - it does see regular use, especially the weekends - I enjoy watching movies, Amazon/NetFlix original content.

I am using the projector with a Silver Ticket STR-169120 screen (not projecting on wall). I watch during the night (dark), which is why I haven't paid much attention to lighting ...

What would be a good upgrade for me? I would like to improve my "cinematic experience" ... Projector, screen? Room treatment?
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