BenQ Officially Announces HT2550 4K HDR DLP Projector - Page 28 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #811 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 01:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 3DBob View Post
BattleAxeVR: He's talking about a 1920x1080 .67 chip compared to a .47 1920x1080 chip used for 4K saying that contrast is always better on a bigger 1920x1080 chip--my read. Which is probably true. But in the eshift 4K world, it's a toss up between the .66 chip and the .47 chip since they both have the same mirror size.
Right but my point is that his comparison image is somewhat irrelevant, what matters today is that you can get perfectly acceptable contrast (or comparable to DC3 1080p DLP contrast) at 4K with 5.4 micron tilt and roll mirrors by buying an XPR 0.66 model.

Put it this way, there is a wide range of contrast ratios for 0.66 XPR projectors from around 700-800:1 (older BenQs) to 1900:1 (Acer VL7860), so the Tilt and Roll 5.4 micron chips can do it, and there's no reason they couldn't deliver 1900:1 on a 0.47 DMD if they used appropriate light path and masking.

I think we're jumping to conclusions based on one reference design. I would buy the 0.66 XPR model in a heart beat if they offered 3D and input at the native resolution. Some 0.66 XPRs actually do support 120hz input at 1080p which surprised me, but unfortunately it gets upscaled. It might be ok looking for some games but the input lag needs work too.

But if you want 3D and are ok with using interpolation on a PC, you could get a 0.66 inch model with 1900:1 native contrast, set it to 120hz 1080p, and use your PC to sync to LCD shutter glasses at 120hz. I would do this myself but I need lower input lag so I have to wait anyway. I am also considering the 5040 replacement in September if there is one, with full 18 gbps inputs and frame interpolation at 4K.
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post #812 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 02:28 PM
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@BattleAxeVR ; As others have discussed, the .66 has better contrast because it does less eshifts. The additional eshifts on the .47 chip causes the decrease in contrast, not the chip itself or lack of masking, etc. Also, I didn't understand the 3D reference to get a .66 model to do 3D through use of 120hz. Even if that were possible, the image would be smaller since the .66 chip is bigger. If it doesn't eshift, sending 1920x1080 through it would mean you'd have to zoom in to see 3D. But as they say, "I'm willing to learn." So has anyone tried sending a 3D PC signal to an Optoma UHD60 or 65????
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post #813 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 03:00 PM
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I've posted my review. For everyone who has messaged me with encouragement I want to say thank you and I appreciate your patience. I hope this review is helpful.

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/68-dig...l#post55739562
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post #814 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Brajesh View Post
@kraine , excellent & honest review, thanks. As I got 3D to work well w/my Epson 5040UB, decided to stick w/it. Even when I briefly compared it and BenQ HT2550 when I had it, the colors, black levels & contrast were all noticeably better on Epson.
Did you try any others or just these two
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post #815 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 04:49 PM
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Can you give me a couple models to research, preferably under 1k if they are only 1080p. Would be nice to have a faster refresh rate too for xbox gaming. Thanks.
Should start a thread with all the details of your setup and wants/needs
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post #816 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by 3DBob View Post
@BattleAxeVR ; As others have discussed, the .66 has better contrast because it does less eshifts. The additional eshifts on the .47 chip causes the decrease in contrast, not the chip itself or lack of masking, etc. ...
Does this image illustrate the point you're making about the extra shifts resulting in greater pixel overlap and therefore decreased contrast?

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post #817 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Calibratedlumens View Post
Did you try any others or just these two
Just these two. Don't want a dual PJ setup, otherwise I might've gone Vivitek HK2288 + BenQ 2050. Considered JVC 420/440, but didn't seem worth the price premium over Epson.

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post #818 of 1064 Old 02-22-2018, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Brajesh View Post
Just these two. Don't want a dual PJ setup, otherwise I might've gone Vivitek HK2288 + BenQ 2050. Considered JVC 420/440, but didn't seem worth the price premium over Epson.


Don’t let any of the JVC guys hear you say that! Lol!
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post #819 of 1064 Old 02-23-2018, 08:45 AM
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I was asked to post the text of my review here as well so I'm going to do that as I realize many people are following this thread and won't see the new post. To be clear: I started a new thread as we needed an owners thread and for the increased visibility that a new thread provides for searches. Plus there are many pages of speculation here before the projector was actually released.


I'm going to be honest: I did not expect my opinion to be this controversial. Shockingly, I found some things about this projector I actually liked.
After seeing Kraine's assessment I went back for two days to revisit this projector (I had already moved on to my next review and was working off notes at that point). I stand by my review. I am not a pro reviewer and have always been honest that these are amateur assessments based on what my eyes see and the test patterns I have access to. I've been an active member on this forum for over 10 years and an AV enthusiast for 20. This is not my first rodeo and those that have been around long enough will remember my famous (or infamous) upconverting DVD player shootout where I, frankly, abused Best Buy's return policy by purchasing over a half dozen players all at once. Lol! I am not paid by BenQ and I agreed to review these models as, honestly, it's a lot of fun and I thought my voice could be helpful to others here. I thought my reputation was strong but while I have received a ton of encouragement and positive feed back I've also had my integrity challenged more times than I can count. These are my opinions. You are free to disagree with me and you are free to challenge me but let's please be civil. Thanks.


Thanks to BenQ for sending me a review sample of their brand new HT2550 4K HDR Home Cinema Projector. Here is my review.



Affordable 4K projection comes home.



I'm going to be honest with you, I didn't see this coming. Had you told me even 6 months ago that we would be seeing a 4K projector from a respected name brand for less than $1500 this soon I would have told you you were dreaming. Consider this review my official resignation from the prediction business. The recently released BenQ HT2550 brings 4K UHD projection home for the previously unheard of price of $1499. In this case the HT2550 isn't just a new model it represents an entirely new segment as it is the most affordable way to enjoy 4K UHD content in a large format at home. To say that I was excited to receive and begin reviewing this latest projector would be an understatement. I've spent more time with the HT2550 testing a wider variety of content than any previous product I've had the good fortune to review. I hope you find this review useful and informative.



Basics and Setup



The HT2550 is advertised as having a True 4K native resolution of 3840x2160 (more on that in a bit). It has support for HDR10 that BenQ says has been projector-optimized, as well as BenQ's CinematicColor technology which promises over 96% coverage of the Rec. 709 color gamut and delta E errors of less than 3 for a color accurate image right out of the box. The HT2550 does not support an expanded color gamut. Other features are a 2200 ANSI lumen rating, a 1.2x zoom lens and an RGBRGB color wheel-- the latter prized among enthusiasts. BenQ continues to improve on their lamp life and now claims a whopping 10,000 hours in Eco and a still impressive 8000 hours in the popular SmartEco lamp mode. The HT2550 comes standard with an industry leading 3 year warranty.



The HT2550 has a handsome white chassis that, at only 14" wide and less than 11" deep, is by far the most compact of any projector packing 4K resolution. While small for a 4K projector, BenQ's latest is heavier than your average DLP with similar dimensions-- weighing 9.3lbs the HT2550 is 2lbs heavier than my own, comparatively larger, 1080p projector. This weight lends the HT2550 a solid feel and the dark grey faceplate with gold 4K logo completes the look. Around back you'll find two HDMI ports, the first being HDCP 2.2 capable of a full 18Gbps for 4K HDR @ 60 fps, along with a VGA input, RS 232 port, a USB A, USB B and a pair of audio 3.5mm in/out jacks. Picture presets included are Cinema, Vivid, Sport, Bright and a pair of ISF day/night modes.



The HT2550 has a rather conventional throw ratio of 1.47-1.76. To target a 100" screen you'll need around 11 feet of distance lens to screen. The HT2550 lacks any sort of lens shift which means if you are mounting the projector you'll need to use extra care to make sure your projector and screen are aligned. BenQ has equipped the HT2550 with an automatic vertical keystone correction which will automatically square the image if tilting is required but I recommend to avoid this when possible as keystone correction lowers resolution. There is no horizontal correction available. For my review the projector was mounted to my back wall and auto keystone correction was disabled.



For my testing the projector was connected directly to a Sony X800 UHD bluray player for playback of a variety of UHD discs and some limited streaming. I also swapped in a PS4 at one point for some gaming. My screen is a fixed frame 100" Silver Ticket White.



A quick word on True 4K vs Native 4K



The HT2550 debuts a brand new DLP light engine featuring the new .47 DMD utilizing Texas Instruments XPR pixel shifting technology. Pixel shifting has been on the market for a couple of years now in high end 3LCD and LCoS projectors but it so far has been limited to providing an 'enhanced' resolution that essentially doubles those projector's native 1080p resolutions to around 4 million distinct pixels. While the DMD at the core of the HT2550 also has a resolution of 1920x1080p the XPR technology then quadruples it to produce the 8.3 million distinct pixels required to classify it as 'True' 4K UHD. So, essentially, each pixel on the chip is responsible for displaying 4 pixels on the screen. This is distinct from a 'native' solution where each pixel on the chip would be responsible for displaying 1 pixel on the screen. There is a great bit of debate around the internet and especially on this forum as to how shifting solutions stack up to native solutions. Currently, the least expensive native 4K projector on the market is the Sony VPL-VW285ES which retails for $4,999.99-- more than three times the price of the model we are looking at here.



Picture Quality



It's becoming almost cliché to start this section of my review of any BenQ product by reminding my reader of BenQ's penchant for delivering projectors that have excellent color quality right out-of-the-box. Nevertheless, here we are with another BenQ projector that, despite spending a great deal of time fussing over the various picture settings and consuming slide after slide of test patterns, is damn near perfect without having to touch a picture setting. In my darkened room I needed only to change the picture mode to Cinema and move the brightness setting up a single notch to achieve a beautiful image. Besides a tendency of whites to look a little cool, color is accurate without adjustment. Mid tones in particular really shine on this projector with skin tones that look natural and color that is well saturated. Contrast performance is a bit of a mixed bag as the HT2550 suffers from less than stellar black levels. In mixed scenes with a lot of bright highlights the high ANSI contrast of DLP produces an image with a lot of pop but in darker scenes blacks tend more towards grey and the image loses much of it's punch. Despite this, shadow detail remains excellent.



Of course, the party piece of the HT2550 is the 4K resolution and here the projector does not disappoint. The image is impossibly sharp and in my many hours of viewing I noticed no artifacts or instability in the image-- a credit to the XPR design. Similar credit goes to BenQ for equipping the HT2550 with a high quality lens that can render this resolution without issue-- the optics here are excellent. Edges look crisp and there's a fluidity to the image that makes you forget you are watching a fixed pixel display. Honestly, this is THE way to enjoy ultra high resolution content. On smaller screens the resolution advantages of UHD are subtle to non existent as the size of the screen and the average viewing distance eradicate the extra detail the 4K resolution provides. But at the sizes you can achieve with a projector all that extra resolution becomes intoxicating. As I stated my screen is 100" and this is as large as I can make the picture without knocking out a wall (my room is quite narrow) but if you're considering this projector for yourself I would advise a larger screen. While 100" is ideal for 1080p at my seating distance, with 4K that goes out the window. At one point while watching The Martian I just dragged my chair up to be front and center with screen so I could soak up all the extra details evident in the picture. After two weeks with the HT2550, going back to my own 1080p projector, I was surprised at just how accustomed to the extra detail I had become. While I'll stop short of saying 1080p looks soft to me now the extra degree of sharpness and clarity the 4K provides is a tangible advantage in the sizes you can push with a projector.



UHD isn't all about resolution, however, and I took the time to test out it's HDR capabilities. First, let me say that projectors are somewhat limited in their ability to display HDR content and I went in with my expectations in check. Projectors typically cannot reach the nit output required to display HDR properly and don't have the contrast performance of an OLED or FALD LCD. BenQ has implemented their own HDR mapping and in my testing the feature worked well. Now, to be clear, when viewing HDR and SDR material back to back the differences were quite subtle and not nearly as dramatic as what you'd find on the average OLED. But at no point did the implementation create any issues like I've seen on some other projectors. With HDR engaged you get a few brighter highlights and colors seem to have an even greater degree of saturation. Being that the HT2550 does not support an expanded color gamut you're not going to get any advantages there either although the color performance remains accurate to Rec 709.



The Light Border



It's time to talk about it. Anyone who has been following this projector since it's announcement or have read other reviews will have no doubt read about the dreaded 'light border' which appears as a thick strip of grey light that runs around the border of the actual display area. The border is, unfortunately, large enough that my 2.5 inches of felt border that runs around my screen is not large enough to soak it up and I end up with 1-1.5 inches of 'overshoot' that hits my wall. According to BenQ this is a side effect of the .47 DMD design and is caused by a several rows of unused micro mirrors surrounding the active area of the DMD.



First, let me say that the fact that this made it through to the final design of the DMD is surprising to me. That being said: after a couple of days with the projector I all but forgot it was there. Now, It should be said that my front wall is a medium 'mocha' color and that likely has a great deal to do with it not being as distracting as some other reviewers have pointed out. If you are running a thin or zero border screen or your front wall is a white or off white color you may find the issue unacceptable. In either case it's important to plan for this if you are interested in this projector. Additional masking or a dark painted front wall would go a long way towards mitigating the issue.



On a lighter note (pun intended), one unintended consequence of the light border: a recent visitor to my home thought I had installed a subtle back lighting around my screen.



3D Performance



3D is slowly disappearing from consumer displays so when BenQ announced that the HT2550 would support the format 3D fans rejoiced. Unfortunately the first two shipments of HT2550s to the states suffer a bug that causes a sync issue with compatible DLP link glasses making 3D content unwatchable. At the time of this writing BenQ has acknowledged the error and have prepared an updated firmware to address the issue. Unfortunately again this fix will require a full projector replacement. For their part BenQ has promised to "hot swap" by shipping working replacements to customers first so that they will not need to be without their projector for any period of time. In the past I've found BenQ projectors to have excellent 3D performance so I'm looking forward to seeing how well the updated units stack up but at this time I have nothing to report.



Gaming Performance



With an input lag of 47ms the HT2550 is not in the same class as some of BenQ's more recent 1080p offerings such as the TH671ST, HT2050A and HT2150ST which all feature a 'fast mode' that reduces input lag to a blazing 16ms. While competitive gamers or those sensitive to input latency will probably want to stick to one of those 1080p offerings, those looking to experience their PS4 PRO or Xbox One X with the highest resolution possible will not be disappointed. The recently remade Shadow of the Colossus by BluePoint Games is an absolute master work and on PS4 PRO running in it's 'Cinematic' mode is one of the most breath taking experiences I've had as a gamer. Running in a native 1440p the HT2550 renders the vast plains and enormous Colossi of this world with a clarity I could only imagine when I first played the original on my PS2 over 10 years ago. Here again, the sheer size of the image brings out details one can only squint at with a traditional display. And DLP's inherently excellent motion resolution means no blur or other motion artifacts. While controller inputs are not as right-now-snappy as what you'd experience with a lower latency display I never felt the input lag as an obstacle to my enjoyment. The responsiveness here will likely be sufficient for the vast majority of gamers.



Value and Final Thoughts



It's hard to judge value of a completely new product in a completely new segment and, really, that's what the HT2550 is. On one end this is absolutely the most economical way to experience 4K in a large format at home and I feel BenQ has done a good job equipping the HT2550 with the image quality performance and features necessary to make this a very complete product and a worthy addition to anyone's home theater. That being said, while $1500 is a new threshold for affordability in 4K projection it's still, well, $1500. While it's difficult to compare this new projector to 1080p projectors as they inhabit two distinct segments of the market I feel it's necessary to mention as I've found many people start with a budget first and then see how far that budget will take them. $1500 dollars will buy you quite a bit of projector these days, albeit in 1080p only. 1080p projectors in the $1500 range will typically have greater placement flexibility thanks to generous amounts of lens shift, better contrast performance, even more features and larger, more refined chassis designs. In fact, BenQ will sell you their HT2050A (a model I'm also reviewing) with similarly excellent color performance, better contrast and black levels, and more features including vertical lens shift and 16ms of input lag-- for exactly half the price. But none of these models will accept a 4K source and none of them will render that source with such breath taking detail and sharpness as the HT2550.



So do I recommend the HT2550? Yes I do. Obviously, if you have absolutely no interest in 4K than your money will go further with a 1080p projector. But 4K is here NOW and for many, many people who are looking for the best way to enjoy that content today and don't want to break the bank to do it the BenQ HT2550 represents an amazing value.



Pros:

Incredibly sharp 4K image

Affordable price

Color accuracy out-of-the-box



Cons:

No lens shift limits placement flexibility

Middling contrast

Light border could be an issue for some
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post #820 of 1064 Old 02-23-2018, 08:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3DBob View Post
@BattleAxeVR ; As others have discussed, the .66 has better contrast because it does less eshifts. The additional eshifts on the .47 chip causes the decrease in contrast, not the chip itself or lack of masking, etc. Also, I didn't understand the 3D reference to get a .66 model to do 3D through use of 120hz. Even if that were possible, the image would be smaller since the .66 chip is bigger. If it doesn't eshift, sending 1920x1080 through it would mean you'd have to zoom in to see 3D. But as they say, "I'm willing to learn." So has anyone tried sending a 3D PC signal to an Optoma UHD60 or 65????
I would be very surprised if it were the additional eshifts causing the contrast drop. In any case, it's easy to confirm either way: set the projector to 1080p60, the XPR module will be off, and measure the contrast again to compare.

It is an interesting experiment, but I honestly doubt it's why the contrast sucks here.

You can also turn off XPR on the 0.66 models too (Silent Mode), but to my knowledge no one has measured contrast between Silent and XPR mode.

Your comment about the image being smaller since the 0.66 chip being bigger has no bearing on 3D or not. It's actually kind of a non sequitur actually, since there's no reason for the projected image to be any bigger or smaller due to the chip size alone, that depends on a variety of factors like the lenses and zoom factor. Sure, if you used the same exact optics on a 0.47 as on a 0.66 the active image would be bigger, but that's comparing apples to oranges and has no bearing on the fact that both the 0.47 and 0.66 projectors have the same pixel pitch. If you zoom them to the same final screen size you'll have more pixels on the 0.66 version hence more sharpness, but I don't see how that directly means it would have more contrast. If anything, it would have worse on/off than the 0.47 models, by the same argument posited by Kraine in the image. Think about it. You have more pixels per the same final screen size, and if those individual pixels have the same black floor, then the 0.66 models would have 1 / 1.4 the contrast of the 0.47 chips. Which isn't the case. The Acer VL 7860 and Optoma UHZ65 have three times more native on/off.

Any display that can do 120hz, a CRT, an LCD, or a projector can do 3D in frame sequential mode using synced 3D glasses. This has been around since the 90s, if not earlier. I've used 3D shutter glasses with my 120hz CRT back when I was in high school.

I checked the manuals for all the XPR projectors and the only ones that so far mention 1080p 120hz input support are: Acer VL7860 and BenQ HT 2550 / W1700. There's no reason the others can't function at 120hz, especially the Viewsonic which from what I can tell is more or less based on the BenQ.

What would be a godsend to gamers would be BenQ opening up 240hz at 1080p. Which HDMI 2.0 can do (in 8-bit RGB only). In 10-bit you could do 192hz at 1080p. And there's a slight possibility that 144hz native would work too, for frame sequential 72hz per eye 3D. Which would offer basically the same thing as DLP Link triple flash but you'd have to do it with LCD shutter glasses and IR transmitters instead of red flash from the projector itself.

True 120hz support is all that's required for a display to be considered "3D Ready".

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post #821 of 1064 Old 02-23-2018, 09:57 AM
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I would be very surprised if it were the additional eshifts causing the contrast drop. In any case, it's easy to confirm either way: set the projector to 1080p60, the XPR module will be off, and measure the contrast again to compare.



It is an interesting experiment, but I honestly doubt it's why the contrast sucks here.



You can also turn off XPR on the 0.66 models too (Silent Mode), but to my knowledge no one has measured contrast between Silent and XPR mode.



Your comment about the image being smaller since the 0.66 chip being bigger has no bearing on 3D or not. It's actually kind of a non sequitur actually, since there's no reason for the projected image to be any bigger or smaller due to the chip size alone, that depends on a variety of factors like the lenses and zoom factor. Sure, if you used the same exact optics on a 0.47 as on a 0.66 the active image would be bigger, but that's comparing apples to oranges and has no bearing on the fact that both the 0.47 and 0.66 projectors have the same pixel pitch. If you zoom them to the same final screen size you'll have more pixels on the 0.66 version hence more sharpness, but I don't see how that directly means it would have more contrast. If anything, it would have worse on/off than the 0.47 models, by the same argument posited by Kraine in the image. Think about it. You have more pixels per the same final screen size, and if those individual pixels have the same black floor, then the 0.66 models would have 1 / 1.4 the contrast of the 0.47 chips. Which isn't the case. The Acer VL 7860 and Optoma UHZ65 have three times more native on/off.



Any display that can do 120hz, a CRT, an LCD, or a projector can do 3D in frame sequential mode using synced 3D glasses. This has been around since the 90s, if not earlier. I've used 3D shutter glasses with my 120hz CRT back when I was in high school.



I checked the manuals for all the XPR projectors and the only ones that so far mention 1080p 120hz input support are: Acer VL7860 and BenQ HT 2550 / W1700. There's no reason the others can't function at 120hz, especially the Viewsonic which from what I can tell is more or less based on the BenQ.



What would be a godsend to gamers would be BenQ opening up 240hz at 1080p. Which HDMI 2.0 can do (in 8-bit RGB only). In 10-bit you could do 192hz at 1080p. And there's a slight possibility that 144hz native would work too, for frame sequential 72hz per eye 3D. Which would offer basically the same thing as DLP Link triple flash but you'd have to do it with LCD shutter glasses and IR transmitters instead of red flash from the projector itself.



True 120hz support is all that's required for a display to be considered "3D Ready".


One thing I want to mention here is you should only consider contrast measurement between projectors when the measurement is performed by the same individual in the same room. I’ve seen wildly differing contrast measurements for the same model over the years.
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post #822 of 1064 Old 02-23-2018, 09:59 AM
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sage11x I appreciated your work here. I figured a like is not enough. It is not easy to put your self and your words out there in a review. Thanks for doing this for us.
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sage11x I appreciated your work here. I figured a like is not enough. It is not easy to put your self and your words out there in a review. Thanks for doing this for us.


Thanks xpostal. I appreciate that.

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I also appreciate your words and reading reviews even if they convince me not to buy a product. If this model measured like the 0.66 XPR projectors I would already have ordered one, light border or no. Frankly, I consider that a minor nuisance except for the fact that it likely is responsible for killing the contrast ratio in the active area. The inactive area I don't care, that's what ten dollars worth of masking material is for and if your theater room isn't already black then you're not really serious about contrast anyway. Worse comes to worse I could DIY mod it.

What I'm hoping for now is a 0.66 XPR shifter that accepts 120hz, allows you to turn XPR off at its native resolution, and has a 1900:1 contrast for a reasonable price and with acceptable input lag when FI is disabled. It's unacceptable that FI being turned off still results in 80ms of input lag. I just don't understand it.
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No lens shift is always going to be a deal breaker for me.

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BenQ Officially Announces HT2550 4K HDR DLP Projector

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Originally Posted by BattleAxeVR View Post
I also appreciate your words and reading reviews even if they convince me not to buy a product. If this model measured like the 0.66 XPR projectors I would already have ordered one, light border or no. Frankly, I consider that a minor nuisance except for the fact that it likely is responsible for killing the contrast ratio in the active area. The inactive area I don't care, that's what ten dollars worth of masking material is for and if your theater room isn't already black then you're not really serious about contrast anyway. Worse comes to worse I could DIY mod it.



What I'm hoping for now is a 0.66 XPR shifter that accepts 120hz, allows you to turn XPR off at its native resolution, and has a 1900:1 contrast for a reasonable price and with acceptable input lag when FI is disabled. It's unacceptable that FI being turned off still results in 80ms of input lag. I just don't understand it.


Thanks BattleAxe.

Yes, the contrast is easily the weakest point of the HT2550. Some scenes, especially with bright highlights, look absolutely gorgeous on this projector. It’s really when the material gets dark that the image looks flat. But I want to stress: at no point would I describe this as “washed out”. DRaven posted pictures and they simply don’t look like the same model I reviewed. (You can find pictures in my new thread). Now he DID say that he was having trouble with handshake and his HDR was giving him problems so perhaps he was having issues with his cable. I don’t know. I had a difficult time getting a good cable and I finally just put my X800 below the ht2550 so I could run a 6 foot hdmi. Never had any issues after that.

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post #827 of 1064 Old 02-23-2018, 04:41 PM
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BenQ Officially Announces HT2550 4K HDR DLP Projector

BenQ has just announced a high brightness version of the HT2550: the TK800.

https://www.benq.com/en/projector/ho...ent/tk800.html

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post #828 of 1064 Old 02-24-2018, 06:31 AM
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The TK800 has a 4 segment color wheel, RGBW to get the extra brightness, which would be great for a very large screen. However, my guess is the rainbow issue would be very bad unless the wheel goes at double the normal speed.
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post #829 of 1064 Old 02-24-2018, 09:20 AM
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The TK800 has a 4 segment color wheel, RGBW to get the extra brightness, which would be great for a very large screen. However, my guess is the rainbow issue would be very bad unless the wheel goes at double the normal speed.
It's very possible. I think I'll have a chance to get an early look at the model in a couple of weeks time so I'll report back. In either case this is certainly not going to help in the black level / contrast department which is the chief complaint about the HT2550. Still, if you're more interested in a bright room model (which is clearly the intended use) it might not be of large concern.

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Quote:
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Does this image illustrate the point you're making about the extra shifts resulting in greater pixel overlap and therefore decreased contrast?

Maybe. I could be totally wrong. I'm not sure, but since shifting is a lateral operation on pixels, yes it would ruin local contrast for 1-pixel wide 2160p content but not across the entire scene, and certainly not for full on / full off contrast measurements. Surely not. Anyway it's easy enough to test either way.
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post #831 of 1064 Old 02-24-2018, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sage11x View Post
BenQ has just announced a high brightness version of the HT2550: the TK800.

https://www.benq.com/en/projector/ho...ent/tk800.html
same throw, though, right?
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post #832 of 1064 Old 02-24-2018, 11:04 AM
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same throw, though, right?
Yes.


Anyone else notice how BenQ is advertising the native resolution spec?


4K 2K with 4-way XPR
(1920 x 1080)


I like it! Hopefully this calms the 'Faux' K argument down a little bit.
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post #833 of 1064 Old 02-24-2018, 05:38 PM
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Another point to note with the TK800 is that the specs say Rec.709 Coverage >92% vs. >96% for the HT2550, so it's trading less color accuracy for more lumens like business projectors.
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post #834 of 1064 Old 02-26-2018, 12:21 PM
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Optoma UHD50 early adopters are complaining about a buzzing noise - any similar experiences with the HT2550?


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post #835 of 1064 Old 02-26-2018, 12:56 PM
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Optoma UHD50 early adopters are complaining about a buzzing noise - any similar experiences with the HT2550?


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No problems with my review sample. In fact it's quieter than my HT2050 and the HT2050A I just received.

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We hear a high buzzing noise when it’s in 4K mode. Sounds like a spinning unbalanced wheel? In Silent mode, however, the W1700 is very quiet. But in Silent it’s only 1080p, of course.
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post #837 of 1064 Old 02-28-2018, 04:16 PM
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Did benq say they had a solve for the light border and have they said anything new on that?


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post #838 of 1064 Old 02-28-2018, 08:08 PM
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Quote:
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Did benq say they had a solve for the light border and have they said anything new on that?


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JRock there is no solution for the light border. It’s baked into the design of the DMD. Every projector that will feature this DMD is going to have the light border issue and, for that matter, the limited contrast. Sorry my friend but if you want to avoid it you’re going to have to look to one of the .67 DMD projectors. Hopefully BenQ will have a competitor on that front soon (technically they have the HT8050/9050 but they cost a mint).
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post #839 of 1064 Old 02-28-2018, 08:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
Another point to note with the TK800 is that the specs say Rec.709 Coverage >92% vs. >96% for the HT2550, so it's trading less color accuracy for more lumens like business projectors.


Question re: this... is the 3000 claimed lumens going to help in color scenes or only on white images? When there is a white slice in the color wheel this typically means that calibrated color lumens do not benefit.

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It's a known issue. BenQ will need to replace your unit w/a new one, apparently a new circuit board and firmware. BenQ rep admitted it in response to my comment on Amazon.com for HT2550, yes same PJ as W1700.
I get the message yesterday to ask me ship back my W1700 for firmware update. It seems the new firmware is ready to go & not swap the old unit. Benq will suffer the shipping cost, but I will bring my unit from Hong Kong to Shenzhen's service center by this week end. Then they will send it to Guangzhou for the firmware update.
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