PJ and Screen suggestions for a visually impaired bright room. - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 9 Old 03-16-2018, 10:31 AM - Thread Starter
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PJ and Screen suggestions for a visually impaired bright room.

Hi,
I'm looking to upgrade my fathers tv watching setup since he's sitting about 7 feet from a 55" tv right now and he's having a hard time seeing the screen. He's 80 years old. Has macular degeneration and is colorblind.

I think contrast is fairly important for him because of his colorblindness but i don't know exactly which color's he has the most difficulty with.

His overall room size is about 15' wide x about 24' long. With 4 large windows on the 24' side. He likes the room bright so he can see the buttons on the remote etc...

I was think i probably have to get him a light cannon in the 3000" lumens range but i'm not sure which ones provide decent contrast. His viewing source is primarily a satellite hd pvr of which he watches mostly SD content still.

We dont' have a specific budget but being he's old school he'll have a hard time letting me spend more than 3 or 4k on screen and projector.

One last detail is i live in Canada so need to find places that either ship here or are located in Canada for the devices. I'll be connecting this all with a harmony hub and goole home for basic voice control (on off volume etc.)

Dan M
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post #2 of 9 Old 03-16-2018, 12:00 PM
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Hi Dan

My mom had macular and all that goes with it. Around the same age in fact. First thing I will say is don’t think in terms of what your vision is like and don’t plan on calibration anything close to what you might think is correct. I painted the buttons on her remotes white and stuck big stickers on her player guiding her to the right button, been there done all that. Why is everything black with black buttons and black text on top of that?

As to a display. I tried everything and every size what I found worked best for her was a 19” flat panel TV with her face about a foot from the screen. I would adjust it to her liking and it was super over saturated to the point of being impossible for a person with normal vision to watch. The bigger the image the worse it was it seemed as with macular what you are watching is in your peripheral vision.

We would watch TV together but I would watch the bigger set properly adjusted and she would watch hers.

My sister and brother in law would go visit her and he would sit and watch her TV when they would be in the other room. He always adjusted it back to normal and then leave. I would get a call at 11 at night saying my TV is B&W and I cant watch it. I had work in the morning but didn’t want to think of her going all day with no TV so I would go over and crank the colors to the max.

Not sure how bad your dads eyes are at this point but have him see a projector before you get one is my opinion. They also seem to like a lot of ambient light when viewing and projectors are at their worse with lights on. Take him to a movie theater and see what he says.
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post #3 of 9 Old 03-16-2018, 12:08 PM
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In a well lit room you will lose a lot of contrast with a projector and screen. You can get a pretty nice 75" TV which will more than likely provide better contrast than a projector in that room, and be well under your $4,000 budget.

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post #4 of 9 Old 03-16-2018, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Mercier View Post
Hi,
I'm looking to upgrade my fathers tv watching setup since he's sitting about 7 feet from a 55" tv right now and he's having a hard time seeing the screen. He's 80 years old. Has macular degeneration and is colorblind.

I think contrast is fairly important for him because of his colorblindness but i don't know exactly which color's he has the most difficulty with.

His overall room size is about 15' wide x about 24' long. With 4 large windows on the 24' side. He likes the room bright so he can see the buttons on the remote etc...

I was think i probably have to get him a light cannon in the 3000" lumens range but i'm not sure which ones provide decent contrast. His viewing source is primarily a satellite hd pvr of which he watches mostly SD content still.

We dont' have a specific budget but being he's old school he'll have a hard time letting me spend more than 3 or 4k on screen and projector.

One last detail is i live in Canada so need to find places that either ship here or are located in Canada for the devices. I'll be connecting this all with a harmony hub and goole home for basic voice control (on off volume etc.)

Dan M
Dan,

I would take into consideration the complexities of projector and screen. While it may seem like a simple thing to turn on multiple devices sometimes it's a confusing thing for the elderly. A HDTV with remote (turn on and off, change channels) would be the route I would take. Think about a larger set 65-75". Just a thought.

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post #5 of 9 Old 03-19-2018, 02:30 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the replies.

The vision loss is definitely a challenge and I agree the light he likes in the room is even more of a challenge from a display perspective. His main issue is the guide on his satellite as it is getting harder and harder for him to read. I figured make the whole image much bigger and it'd be better. But 55" to 65" isn't that much of a difference. 55" to 100" with a pj is a big difference.

But maybe a 75" set might be worth while. Although they've been frustrated with having to get warranty work as they live 2.5 hours from any major city. I'll shop around for some 75" units.

Dan M
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post #6 of 9 Old 03-19-2018, 08:00 PM
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would those Macular glass help?
http://www.webrn-maculardegeneration...lasses-12.html
https://maculareyewear.com/

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post #7 of 9 Old 03-21-2018, 08:33 PM
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@Dan Mercier is right. Teaching a front projection system to an elderly person with failing vision is not a great idea. In any case, front projection is just not going to work from a visual point of view in a bright room for someone with poor vision. That's just chasing a unicorn. You really need to get the biggest, brightest LCD TV you can find and perhaps move his chair a foot or two closer to the screen to make it look even bigger. Put the TV in Display (torch) mode like they do when displaying them in big box stores. That will skew the colors but it shouldn't matter to someone who's color blind. There's no front projection system that could come close to that in a bright room for someone with failing vision.

EDIT: Just to add, Costco Canada has 75" TVs for as little as $2,200. A 75" TV will have nearly twice the screen area of his present 55" TV.

Last edited by Dave in Green; 03-21-2018 at 08:39 PM.
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post #8 of 9 Old 02-14-2020, 07:21 AM
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Display for Macular Degeneration, impaired vision, elderly, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Mercier View Post
Thanks for all the replies.

The vision loss is definitely a challenge and I agree the light he likes in the room is even more of a challenge from a display perspective. His main issue is the guide on his satellite as it is getting harder and harder for him to read. I figured make the whole image much bigger and it'd be better. But 55" to 65" isn't that much of a difference. 55" to 100" with a pj is a big difference.

But maybe a 75" set might be worth while. Although they've been frustrated with having to get warranty work as they live 2.5 hours from any major city. I'll shop around for some 75" units.

Dan M
Realizing it's been nearly 2 years since last postings on this thread . . .

Hello to all. If you read this Dan, I was wondering what display you eventually decided on, and if you've been happy with it.

We're currently shopping for an elderly family member with very impaired vision (Macular Degeneration Glaucoma - w/vision basically only in one eye). Budget is approx $550 max; max space for panel is 55"; she watches tv mostly in her bedroom; TV centered w/bed, approx 4' off foot of bed; room typ fairly well lit, with two 3' x 5' windows at each side of her headboard, (i.e. westerly afternoon sunlight shining into room--towards tv); she often leaves the louvered blinds partially open, although blinds can be shut, nevertheless reflections are somewhat of a concern for us. She watches 99% DirecTV (DTV) satellite (news, tv shows, movie) content (so 60i feed) which I see is handled by the TCL R625. And so wondering if anyone might be able to suggest which TV may be best/better for someone in her type of situation with severely impaired vision?

From what I've read, possibly the three most important factors are:

1) High contrast (according to an MIT Technology Review article re: research on "TV for the visually impaired" conducted by Schepens Eye Research Institute)
2) High brightness levels
3) decent reflection handling (which has us skeptical about the TCL R625, as it's rated as having the worst reflection handling by rtings .com)

Thanks to everyone with any suggestions.
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post #9 of 9 Old 02-14-2020, 08:00 AM
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Forgot to mention, we are currently trying to decide between: TCL R625 vs. Vizio M558-G1 ??
After deciding to return an un-opened LG 50UM7300 we purchased a few days ago.

rtings .com/tv/tools/compare/vizio-m-series-quantum-2019-vs-tcl-r625/845/1591

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilga View Post
Realizing it's been nearly 2 years since last postings on this thread . . .

Hello to all. If you read this Dan, I was wondering what display you eventually decided on, and if you've been happy with it.

We're currently shopping for an elderly family member with very impaired vision (Macular Degeneration Glaucoma - w/vision basically only in one eye). Budget is approx $550 max; max space for panel is 55"; she watches tv mostly in her bedroom; TV centered w/bed, approx 4' off foot of bed; room typ fairly well lit, with two 3' x 5' windows at each side of her headboard, (i.e. westerly afternoon sunlight shining into room--towards tv); she often leaves the louvered blinds partially open, although blinds can be shut, nevertheless reflections are somewhat of a concern for us. She watches 99% DirecTV (DTV) satellite (news, tv shows, movie) content (so 60i feed) which I see is handled by the TCL R625. And so wondering if anyone might be able to suggest which TV may be best/better for someone in her type of situation with severely impaired vision?

From what I've read, possibly the three most important factors are:

1) High contrast (according to an MIT Technology Review article re: research on "TV for the visually impaired" conducted by Schepens Eye Research Institute)
2) High brightness levels
3) Decent reflection handling (which has us skeptical about the TCL R625, as it's rated as having the worst reflection handling by rtings .com)

Thanks to everyone with any suggestions.
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