Which Epson to get? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 4Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 02:53 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Which Epson to get?

Hi everyone,

I am looking for a projector to place under my couch that will project onto an off-white tilted attic ceiling. Both my wife and I can see rainbow effects so we have decided to go for an Epson (LCD). I will mostly project in the dark, near pitch black.

Candidates:

Epson 1060 @ $550
Epson 2150 @ $799
Epson 3700 @ $999

Question:

Since I will be placing the projector under the couch, and projecting onto a tilted wall, how concerned should I be with image quality. Is it worth spending extra on the 2150/3700 considering the subpar placement/no screen? And lastly, how noticeable is the difference in image quality between the three projectors when not used in ideal settings.

Thanks!

Chris
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 03:00 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Dave in Green's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 7,924
Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3578 Post(s)
Liked: 2764
You will get increasingly better performance as you spend more money. It sounds as if your setup will be extremely unorthodox and will require a lot of effort. The Epson 3700 has a significant advantage of having extensive vertical and horizontal lens shift, which will help significantly in getting a proper image in your unusual setup. However, you would have to be careful about putting any projector under a couch as they need space to breathe. If you put a projector in a restricted area like under a couch it could overheat and fail. It would be best to consider different mounting options. Pictures of your room would help a lot.
n84china likes this.
Dave in Green is offline  
post #3 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 03:36 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
You will get increasingly better performance as you spend more money. It sounds as if your setup will be extremely unorthodox and will require a lot of effort. The Epson 3700 has a significant advantage of having extensive vertical and horizontal lens shift, which will help significantly in getting a proper image in your unusual setup. However, you would have to be careful about putting any projector under a couch as they need space to breathe. If you put a projector in a restricted area like under a couch it could overheat and fail. It would be best to consider different mounting options. Pictures of your room would help a lot.
Thanks for the quick reply Dave.

I do come up with some crazy ideas sometimes. I am now obsessed with the idea of hiding away all electronics in the upstairs living room, hence placing the projector under the couch.

Last weekend I borrowed a projector from a friend which I placed both behind and under the couch and it worked fine. "Fine" is of course very subjective and my setup would probably be unacceptable to most people on this forum.

I used a Hitachi with 30 degree keystone correction and 1.5 throw ratio to project the screen onto the ceiling/wall (please see the attached photo for room layout). The keystone correction created a frame of soft light around the projected picture, as it does, which is far from ideal. However, the four of us watching enjoyed the experience and I could accept the "light leak" from the keystone correction.

I think I might need around a 1 - 1.1 throw ratio to throw 120 inches onto the wall from under the couch. I believe the 1060 has a ratio in that range.

Regarding overheating there will be space around the projector for circulation. The 1060 is slimmer than both the 2150 and 3700 which would work in its advantage if placed under the couch... I assume?

What do you think?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0707.jpg
Views:	423
Size:	920.4 KB
ID:	2453778  
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 03:36 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
3DBob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Southeastern Michigan
Posts: 2,393
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1056 Post(s)
Liked: 566
I agree with Dave, putting a projector under a couch, no matter how much gap there is, is a bad thing. Years ago, I made a coffee table that had a shelf underneath with lots of air circulation. I made sure that spilling a drink would also not get to the projector. It made me sit further back, but the weird sensation of not having a TV projector seen was a real crowd pleaser. It also helped keep the projector noise down, but you need air flow in at least one full direction, either side to side, which I had, or front to back. Having the opening from side to side allowed me to not have an opening in the back where the light could leak out, or could be bumped or banged with feet, etc. Cables are another consideration, of course. You can hide them under a stiff rug. Also in this arrangement you can have holes under the projector to increase the air flow up and around the projector. You should always have at least 4 inches of breathing room over the projector--ie. wherever the heat rises too. You can also create a slight "V" baffle over the projector so that heat will naturally flow up and out either side.
3DBob is offline  
post #5 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 03:43 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3DBob View Post
I agree with Dave, putting a projector under a couch, no matter how much gap there is, is a bad thing. Years ago, I made a coffee table that had a shelf underneath with lots of air circulation. I made sure that spilling a drink would also not get to the projector. It made me sit further back, but the weird sensation of not having a TV projector seen was a real crowd pleaser. It also helped keep the projector noise down, but you need air flow in at least one full direction, either side to side, which I had, or front to back. Having the opening from side to side allowed me to not have an opening in the back where the light could leak out, or could be bumped or banged with feet, etc. Cables are another consideration, of course. You can hide them under a stiff rug. Also in this arrangement you can have holes under the projector to increase the air flow up and around the projector. You should always have at least 4 inches of breathing room over the projector--ie. wherever the heat rises too. You can also create a slight "V" baffle over the projector so that heat will naturally flow up and out either side.
Thanks Bob, excellent feedback. If placed under the couch the projector will have plenty of room for air circulation around it but obviously not above or underneath it. You think that would be an issue?
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #6 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 05:06 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Dave in Green's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 7,924
Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3578 Post(s)
Liked: 2764
Projectors don't need space underneath because they are designed to sit on their feet on a flat surface. They do need space above because heat rises and will be somewhat trapped under the couch. It may work OK but there's at least some risk that if the air temperature around the projector gets too high you may get an overheating warning. I suppose you could try it and pay close attention to how hot it gets.

If you were OK viewing an image on another projector with 30 degrees of keystone correction then it sounds as if image quality is not critical to you because with 30 degrees of keystone you are throwing away a lot of resolution. If you feed a 1920x1080 pixel projector 1920x1080 content like Blu-ray you will get much lower than 1920x1080 resolution when using 30 degrees of keystone correction. Many projector owners wouldn't tolerate that much image degradation but some aren't as sensitive to a degraded image. In any case you are never going to get an optimized image with that setup.

If the Epson 1060 has the right throw range to produce the size image you want at the distance you're working with then it might be the best option for you. The 1060 has a shorter throw than the other two Epson models you mentioned and so can throw a larger image from a shorter distance. Picking a projector model with the correct throw range is the most important first step and is determined by the desired image size and the distance between the front of the lens and the surface you're projecting onto.
Dave in Green is offline  
post #7 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 05:15 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
steve1106's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Northern, Va
Posts: 2,118
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 821 Post(s)
Liked: 540
I wouldn't be to concerned about underneath the projector other than having the heat impact your hardwoods. The 3700 would be the easiest to dial in with lens shift and the air comes in on the side and exhausts from the front, but size might be an issue with your couch.


Taking my old HC2000 vs the HC3700 you can see the relative size difference (Thumbs) but the lens shift might make it better suited to you application. Did you try raising the front of the sample projector to match the angle of the wall to see if that reduced the "light box" around the image caused by the keystone? I would want to remove as much as possible absent painting your screen area a nice medium grey.

Another thing to remember is dust is not the friend of a projector, so you might have to replace the filters more often at ground level.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC02044a.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	186.6 KB
ID:	2453802   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC01437a.jpg
Views:	58
Size:	225.6 KB
ID:	2453804   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC00994a.jpg
Views:	61
Size:	101.3 KB
ID:	2453812   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC00996a.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	438.3 KB
ID:	2453816  

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/15-ge...eap-build.html
Epson HC3700/HC2000; Screen - 151.5" 16:9/TV or 143.5" 2.35:1/HT at a seating distance of 12-15 feet; Yamaha RXV675 for 7.4; Speakers - Infinity Primus; Subs - 3 Polk PSW10s, 1 BIC F12; Headphones - 5 JVC wireless; Sony 3D Blu-ray player/six pairs 3D glasses.
steve1106 is offline  
post #8 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 05:44 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
3DBob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Southeastern Michigan
Posts: 2,393
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1056 Post(s)
Liked: 566
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWidstrom View Post
Thanks Bob, excellent feedback. If placed under the couch the projector will have plenty of room for air circulation around it but obviously not above or underneath it. You think that would be an issue?
Yes, but I have seen people hook up small computer fans with a low voltage kit and that works. Heat can be trapped and it will tend to rise into the couch and not move much without forced circulation, thus causing too much heat buildup. Or you could get a small round spiral fan and put it behind the couch. That way it wouldn't make too much noise.
3DBob is offline  
post #9 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 06:42 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
Projectors don't need space underneath because they are designed to sit on their feet on a flat surface. They do need space above because heat rises and will be somewhat trapped under the couch. It may work OK but there's at least some risk that if the air temperature around the projector gets too high you may get an overheating warning. I suppose you could try it and pay close attention to how hot it gets.

If you were OK viewing an image on another projector with 30 degrees of keystone correction then it sounds as if image quality is not critical to you because with 30 degrees of keystone you are throwing away a lot of resolution. If you feed a 1920x1080 pixel projector 1920x1080 content like Blu-ray you will get much lower than 1920x1080 resolution when using 30 degrees of keystone correction. Many projector owners wouldn't tolerate that much image degradation but some aren't as sensitive to a degraded image. In any case you are never going to get an optimized image with that setup.

If the Epson 1060 has the right throw range to produce the size image you want at the distance you're working with then it might be the best option for you. The 1060 has a shorter throw than the other two Epson models you mentioned and so can throw a larger image from a shorter distance. Picking a projector model with the correct throw range is the most important first step and is determined by the desired image size and the distance between the front of the lens and the surface you're projecting onto.
I just checked and there is a decent amount of room between the bottom of the couch and the floor. There will be at least 3 - 4 inches between the top of the projector and the bottom of the couch. But you are right, I will keep a close eye on the temp to avoid overheating.

Your point about keystone correction and image quality makes a lot of sense. That I didn't think about. I think Im leaning more towards the 1060 at this point.

Thanks for the excellent feedback!
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #10 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 07:09 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve1106 View Post
I wouldn't be to concerned about underneath the projector other than having the heat impact your hardwoods. The 3700 would be the easiest to dial in with lens shift and the air comes in on the side and exhausts from the front, but size might be an issue with your couch.


Taking my old HC2000 vs the HC3700 you can see the relative size difference (Thumbs) but the lens shift might make it better suited to you application. Did you try raising the front of the sample projector to match the angle of the wall to see if that reduced the "light box" around the image caused by the keystone? I would want to remove as much as possible absent painting your screen area a nice medium grey.

Another thing to remember is dust is not the friend of a projector, so you might have to replace the filters more often at ground level.
The 3700 is a beast! So you think the lens shift might help mitigate the "light box" if the projector is placed under the couch throwing against the wall? The 3700 will physically fit under the couch but the lens seems to be higher up compared to the 1060 which might be an issue. Another option would be to pull out the projector in front of the couch when watching but then the throw ratio might be a concern for the 3700. The sample projector I used earlier has a throw ratio of 1.5 and worked fine when placed behind the couch. However, when placed under the couch the screen was substantially smaller, I would say around 90 inches compared to 120 when behind the couch.

Excellent point about raising the projector to match the angle of the wall. That could potentially solve some of the keystone issues. That brings me back to my earlier question about the lens shift. Would a 3700 or 2150 in front of the couch, raised to match the angle of the wall + lens shift, fix the keystone light box issue?

Thanks!
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #11 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 07:24 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Dave in Green's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 7,924
Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3578 Post(s)
Liked: 2764
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWidstrom View Post
… Your point about keystone correction and image quality makes a lot of sense. That I didn't think about. I think Im leaning more towards the 1060 at this point. ...
The 1060 will likely require about the same 30 degrees of digital keystone correction as the other projector you tried so you would still have the unwanted "light box" and degraded image. The only way to avoid digital keystone correction would be to have a projector with lens shift like the 3700. With the 3700 you could get full 1920x1080 resolution with no image degradation and no "light box." The Epson 3100 costs less than the 3700 but also has lens shift so it also would not require the use of digital keystone correction.

If you can measure the exact distance from where the front of the projector lens will be to the wall on which it will be throwing the image we can use a projection calculator to determine exactly what size image you can get with any projector model. For example, to throw a 120" diagonal image the Epson 3100 and 3700 require a minimum throw distance of 11' 7". The 1060 can throw a 120" image from as close as 8' 11" and as far as 10' 9".

Raising the front of the projector up will help square it with the angled wall but will cause the image to shift up higher than that angled wall. That's why you need vertical lens shift.
Dave in Green is offline  
post #12 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 07:27 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
The 1060 will likely require about the same 30 degrees of digital keystone correction as the other projector you tried so you would still have the unwanted "light box" and degraded image. The only way to avoid digital keystone correction would be to have a projector with lens shift like the 3700. With the 3700 you could get full 1920x1080 resolution with no image degradation and no "light box." The Epson 3100 costs less than the 3700 but also has lens shift so it also would not require the use of digital keystone correction.

If you can measure the exact distance from where the front of the projector lens will be to the wall on which it will be throwing the image we can use a projection calculator to determine exactly what size image you can get with any projector model. For example, to throw a 120" diagonal image the Epson 3100 and 3700 require a minimum throw distance of 11' 7". The 1060 can throw a 120" image from as close as 8' 11" and as far as 10' 9".

Raising the front of the projector up will help square it with the angled wall but will cause the image to shift up higher than that angled wall. That's why you need vertical lens shift.
Excellent idea! Since the wall is tilted, would the distance between the projector and the wall be measured from the top, middle or bottom of where the image is projected on the wall?
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #13 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 07:32 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
rekbones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Somers, CT
Posts: 2,947
Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 942 Post(s)
Liked: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWidstrom View Post
Excellent point about raising the projector to match the angle of the wall. That could potentially solve some of the keystone issues. That brings me back to my earlier question about the lens shift. Would a 3700 or 2150 in front of the couch, raised to match the angle of the wall + lens shift, fix the keystone light box issue?

Thanks!
I don't think lens shift will help much because the projector would still need to be perpendicular to the screen and it doesn't look like you have enough room to angle the projector that much. Lens shift only moves the image up/down left/right it won't correct keystone unless you can get the projector exactly 90% to the screen.

Edit: I missed the in front of the couch thing, only the 3700 has enough lens shift and yes it will work if angled correctly but again your reducing throw and might have too small of a picture.

Edit: looking at the room again a 1060/2150 might work but would need to be upside down and at 90% to the wall. If you have some DIY skills you could make a stand for such an odd configuration. TOUGH ROOM!

"Smart enough to know better, to old to care" ------ Dedicated Bat Cave Home Theater, JVC RS49U/Mitsubishi HC7900DW Projector, 110" 16:9 Jamestown screen with variable power masking for CIW 2.50:1 to 16:9, Marantz 7009 with 7.1.4 Atmos with Ohm mains,3 DIY Subs (2 15" (1 ported, 1 sealed and a 12" 4th order bandpass), 1 DIY butt kicker, Custom Built HTPC, 18TB DroboFS NAS

Last edited by rekbones; 09-10-2018 at 07:43 PM.
rekbones is offline  
post #14 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 07:42 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Dave in Green's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 7,924
Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3578 Post(s)
Liked: 2764
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWidstrom View Post
Excellent idea! Since the wall is tilted, would the distance between the projector and the wall be measured from the top, middle or bottom of where the image is projected on the wall?
@rekbones is correct. Projectors are designed to be at exactly a 90-degree angle to the surface they're projecting on. What you would need to do is raise the front of the projector to the point that it's perpendicular to the angled wall. Looking at the image of the room the wall is at such an extreme angle that even the 3100/3700 might not have enough lens shift to compensate for the extreme angle.

What you are trying to accomplish reminds me of the old saying about trying to pound a square peg into a round hole. You might eventually be able to pound that square peg in but it's going to get a little mutilated in the process.
Dave in Green is offline  
post #15 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 08:00 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekbones View Post
I don't think lens shift will help much because the projector would still need to be perpendicular to the screen and it doesn't look like you have enough room to angle the projector that much. Lens shift only moves the image up/down left/right it won't correct keystone unless you can get the projector exactly 90% to the screen.

Edit: I missed the in front of the couch thing, only the 3700 has enough lens shift and yes it will work if angled correctly but again your reducing throw and might have too small of a picture.

Edit: looking at the room again a 1060/2150 might work but would need to be upside down and at 90% to the wall. If you have some DIY skills you could make a stand for such an odd configuration. TOUGH ROOM!
Thanks! So I guess it boils down to image quality vs image size. The 1060, with the smaller throw ratio, would be able to project a larger image. But with the keystone pretty much maxed out the quality would suffer. On the other hand the 2150/3700, with the larger throw ratio + lens shift, wouldn't need as much keystone correction and therefore project a better quality, but smaller, image.

Im leaning towards bigger image size I think. How bad will the image quality of the 1060 be with maxed keystone correction you think?
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #16 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 08:09 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
@rekbones is correct. Projectors are designed to be at exactly a 90-degree angle to the surface they're projecting on. What you would need to do is raise the front of the projector to the point that it's perpendicular to the angled wall. Looking at the image of the room the wall is at such an extreme angle that even the 3100/3700 might not have enough lens shift to compensate for the extreme angle.

What you are trying to accomplish reminds me of the old saying about trying to pound a square peg into a round hole. You might eventually be able to pound that square peg in but it's going to get a little mutilated in the process.
LOL.. yes! In situations like this I wish Best Buy wouldn't charge the 15% restocking fee on projectors... no pain, no gain I guess!
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #17 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 08:25 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Dave in Green's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 7,924
Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3578 Post(s)
Liked: 2764
What you saw with the borrowed projector using 30 degrees of digital keystone correction is pretty close to what you'd get with the 1060 or any similar model. Projectors just aren't designed to be placed on the floor under a couch and projecting onto a severely angled wall. A compromised environment will result in a compromised image.
Dave in Green is offline  
post #18 of 44 Old 09-10-2018, 08:37 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
What you saw with the borrowed projector using 30 degrees of digital keystone correction is pretty close to what you'd get with the 1060 or any similar model. Projectors just aren't designed to be placed on the floor under a couch and projecting onto a severely angled wall. A compromised environment will result in a compromised image.
Got it! To be honest I was pretty happy with the borrowed projector apart from contrast and black levels. Considering the crazy setup I am aiming for, I think getting the 1060 is the most sensible option for now. Then, if I ever have the luxury to move to somewhere with straight walls, I can upgrade to something more capable.

Thanks again!
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #19 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 03:09 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Dave in Green's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 7,924
Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3578 Post(s)
Liked: 2764
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWidstrom View Post
... To be honest I was pretty happy with the borrowed projector apart from contrast and black levels. ...
Not knowing the borrowed projector's identity it's hard to say for certain how the contrast and black levels of the 1060 will compare. The 1060 is considered a bright room projector with an emphasis on maximum lumens and not best contrast and black levels. None of the less expensive projectors have great contrast and black levels. One good thing about the 1060 is that it's the least expensive model with 3LCD which you need due to rainbow sensitivity. At least you will get a bright and colorful image like a big LCD TV without spending a lot of money.
Dave in Green is offline  
post #20 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 08:35 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
sage11x's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Howell, MI
Posts: 6,387
Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2628 Post(s)
Liked: 2577
I’m more worried about another thing...

Placing a projector under the couch is going to allow a lot of dust and dirt to get drawn in through the fans and stuck to the lens. You also have the real possibility of damage from someone kicking it. I’m also not sure how or why mounting a projector that low would be a good idea even without considering the dirt and possibility of damage— won’t legs and feet get in the way?

Sounds like a short throw model might be a better fit in this instance. Something you can place in a table out in front and project up at an angle to hit your wall— assuming that’s what you want to do.

What to do if you find yourself stuck with no hope of rescue:
Consider yourself lucky that life has been good to you so far. Alternatively, if life hasn't been good to you so far, which given your present circumstances seems to be more likely, consider yourself lucky that it won't be troubling you much longer...

-- Excerpt from the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
sage11x is offline  
post #21 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 09:17 AM
Senior Member
 
indio22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Chicagoland area
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by sage11x View Post
I’m more worried about another thing...

Placing a projector under the couch is going to allow a lot of dust and dirt to get drawn in through the fans and stuck to the lens. You also have the real possibility of damage from someone kicking it. I’m also not sure how or why mounting a projector that low would be a good idea even without considering the dirt and possibility of damage— won’t legs and feet get in the way?

Sounds like a short throw model might be a better fit in this instance. Something you can place in a table out in front and project up at an angle to hit your wall— assuming that’s what you want to do.
Agreed the dust situation for me would be a significant concern, unless the owner has a much cleaner house than I have, lol. My understanding is unlike DLP, the LCD apperatice is not sealed, hence the need for a filter? People occasionally complain about dust blobs with LCD messing up the image. Before floor mounting, I would want to have a very clean floor area given that dust will tend to accumulate on the floor and potentially find a way into the projector. Other thing, I have kids and a floor projector would not last long without some sort of protection, but that might not be a concern for this user.
sage11x likes this.
indio22 is offline  
post #22 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 10:10 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
b curry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: on the way to Hell, Michigan USA
Posts: 4,515
Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 985 Post(s)
Liked: 626
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
@rekbones @rekbones is correct. Projectors are designed to be at exactly a 90-degree angle to the surface they're projecting on. What you would need to do is raise the front of the projector to the point that it's perpendicular to the angled wall. Looking at the image of the room the wall is at such an extreme angle that even the 3100/3700 might not have enough lens shift to compensate for the extreme angle.

What you are trying to accomplish reminds me of the old saying about trying to pound a square peg into a round hole. You might eventually be able to pound that square peg in but it's going to get a little mutilated in the process.
Responding to this crazy thread is truly the definition of an exercise in futility...

If you angle the projector so as to aim the lens 90°'s perpendicular to the angle of the ceiling/wall and you're sitting/looking at the image on a horizontal plane parallel to the floor, the image will still have keystone distortion on the vertical plane in the form of one or single point perspective. The top of the image will be both physically closer and appear larger than the bottom of the image and require digital keystone adjustment.

A projectors lens shift works on a vertical and/or horizontal plane only. Lens shift does not travel on an arc and would not correct for the wall angle or keystone.

Think about it.

My suggestion for a solution here would be place the projector at 90°'s perpendicular to the ceiling/wall and watch the movie in a supine position from a reclining chair placed under the image. Or, just install a drop down screen as any sane person would do.
b curry is offline  
post #23 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 10:21 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
sage11x's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Howell, MI
Posts: 6,387
Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2628 Post(s)
Liked: 2577
Quote:
Originally Posted by indio22 View Post
Agreed the dust situation for me would be a significant concern, unless the owner has a much cleaner house than I have, lol. My understanding is unlike DLP, the LCD apperatice is not sealed, hence the need for a filter? People occasionally complain about dust blobs with LCD messing up the image. Before floor mounting, I would want to have a very clean floor area given that dust will tend to accumulate on the floor and potentially find a way into the projector. Other thing, I have kids and a floor projector would not last long without some sort of protection, but that might not be a concern for this user.


Correct, that’s why the filter is in place. And, of course, you could argue that it at least HAS a filter— before anyone jumps on me I’m not making the case for DLP over 3LCD here just making the case for keeping the projector off the floor.

If it were me, I would be going short throw with a tabbed pulldown screen— preferably AT so I could put my speakers in the space behind the screen. Of course, I don’t think Epson sells short throw so that’s another issue...

What to do if you find yourself stuck with no hope of rescue:
Consider yourself lucky that life has been good to you so far. Alternatively, if life hasn't been good to you so far, which given your present circumstances seems to be more likely, consider yourself lucky that it won't be troubling you much longer...

-- Excerpt from the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
sage11x is offline  
post #24 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 10:59 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
b curry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: on the way to Hell, Michigan USA
Posts: 4,515
Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 985 Post(s)
Liked: 626
Quote:
Originally Posted by sage11x View Post
Of course, I don’t think Epson sells short throw so that’s another issue...
Of course they do.

Several different models as a mater of fact. One of the very nice ones is the HC LS100; 4,000 lumens, 2,500,000:1 contrast ratio, and a laser light source.

It will do a 120" diagonal 16x9 screen with a 28" throw.

sage11x likes this.
b curry is offline  
post #25 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 11:09 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
sage11x's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Howell, MI
Posts: 6,387
Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2628 Post(s)
Liked: 2577
Quote:
Originally Posted by b curry View Post
Of course they do.

Several different models as a mater of fact. One of the very nice ones is the HC LS100; 4,000 lumens, 2,500,000:1 contrast ratio, and a laser light source.

It will do a 120" diagonal 16x9 screen with a 28" throw.

There you go! Although not sure if it's in the OP's budget range...

What to do if you find yourself stuck with no hope of rescue:
Consider yourself lucky that life has been good to you so far. Alternatively, if life hasn't been good to you so far, which given your present circumstances seems to be more likely, consider yourself lucky that it won't be troubling you much longer...

-- Excerpt from the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
sage11x is offline  
post #26 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 11:13 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
b curry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: on the way to Hell, Michigan USA
Posts: 4,515
Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 985 Post(s)
Liked: 626
Quote:
Originally Posted by sage11x View Post
There you go! Although not sure if it's in the OP's budget range...
Exactly... Although they do have lamp/bulb based units around $1K and sub $1K.
b curry is offline  
post #27 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 11:24 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Green View Post
Not knowing the borrowed projector's identity it's hard to say for certain how the contrast and black levels of the 1060 will compare. The 1060 is considered a bright room projector with an emphasis on maximum lumens and not best contrast and black levels. None of the less expensive projectors have great contrast and black levels. One good thing about the 1060 is that it's the least expensive model with 3LCD which you need due to rainbow sensitivity. At least you will get a bright and colorful image like a big LCD TV without spending a lot of money.
I believe it was the Hitachi CP-EW302N.

http://www.hitachidigitalmedia.com/f...-datasheet.pdf
Attached Files
File Type: pdf cp-ew302n-datasheet.pdf (754.2 KB, 4 views)
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #28 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 11:29 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by b curry View Post
Responding to this crazy thread is truly the definition of an exercise in futility...

If you angle the projector so as to aim the lens 90°'s perpendicular to the angle of the ceiling/wall and you're sitting/looking at the image on a horizontal plane parallel to the floor, the image will still have keystone distortion on the vertical plane in the form of one or single point perspective. The top of the image will be both physically closer and appear larger than the bottom of the image and require digital keystone adjustment.

A projectors lens shift works on a vertical and/or horizontal plane only. Lens shift does not travel on an arc and would not correct for the wall angle or keystone.

Think about it.

My suggestion for a solution here would be place the projector at 90°'s perpendicular to the ceiling/wall and watch the movie in a supine position from a reclining chair placed under the image. Or, just install a drop down screen as any sane person would do.
Sane is boring

I am actually thinking about bean bags, or similar, to get into a reclined position under the image. However, to get the 90 degree angle I would need a short throw projector. I haven't seen a lot of short throw LCDs on the market. Any specific model you would recommend?
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #29 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 11:34 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by sage11x View Post
There you go! Although not sure if it's in the OP's budget range...
Yes, thats a little steep. Due to RBE I would prefer an LCD projector. I have to do some research on short throw LCDs, I haven't seen many of them so far.

Regarding dust I keep my house very clean. But I see your point. I think getting the 1060 would make more sense if stored under the couch due to its lower price point.
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
post #30 of 44 Old 09-11-2018, 11:35 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by b curry View Post
Exactly... Although they do have lamp/bulb based units around $1K and sub $1K.
Short throw?
ChrisWidstrom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Digital Projectors - Under $3,000 USD MSRP

Tags
Epson , epson 1060 , epson 2150 , epson 3700

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off