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post #1 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 07:38 AM - Thread Starter
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Upgrading to a 4K projector, thinking Optoma UHD60

So my old Mitsubishi VLT-3800LP (1080p) is giving me a warning that its bulb is in need of replacement. After doing some research, it seems that projector is now discontinued and as a result, Mitsubishi does not make bulbs for it anymore either. The only option is getting an aftermarket bulb which the reviews on all that I found were mostly bad and that they go out very quickly.

So, that leads me to where I am currently with wanting to upgrade. I have eventually wanted to upgrade at some point to a 4k projector anyways, and now seems like a perfect time. I recently upgraded my receiver and blu-ray player to 4k, so the only thing left is the projector.

I have a budget of 2,000 or less (I would prefer more on the "less" side of things). From spending about a full day researching I have found that the Optoma UHD60 keeps coming up as one of the best 4k projectors in that price range.

My theater room in my home has an18ft throw distance and a 147" diagonal screen. There is no natural light that goes in the room, so a ton of lumens is not a primary concern. I am looking for the best picture/contrast, and true color resolution I can find.

I thought before I made the purchase, I would check in here and see if anyone has any personal experiences with the Optoma UHD60 or if they reccomend another better projector that fits my criteria.
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post #2 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 08:07 AM
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I have the UHD50 and it is working out well so far.

But for the price right now, the Epson 4000 with its advanced features looks to be a great value.

Here is a comparison between it and the https://www.projectorcentral.com/eps...d60-review.htm

https://www.amazon.com/Epson-Home-Ci...3d14269b0d0INT

The Epson lacks an 18gps port, but there are some work arounds for that.
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Originally Posted by RonBonnell View Post
I have the UHD50 and it is working out well so far.

But for the price right now, the Epson 4000 with its advanced features looks to be a great value.

Here is a comparison between it and the https://www.projectorcentral.com/eps...d60-review.htm

https://www.amazon.com/Epson-Home-Ci...3d14269b0d0INT

The Epson lacks an 18gps port, but there are some work arounds for that.
Thanks for the input! Looks like the Epson is a great value for sure. It seems by its side by side review other than a few areas, it is outperformed by the Optoma though. One area The Epson shines is the auto keystone function. There is no mention on if the Optoma has this or not, and I "Hope" it does as I want a square picture and mine will be mounted near the ceiling so this is one of those risks I may take by going down the Optoma road.

I think though the big items I want are going to be better suited by the optoma.

Contrast on the Optoma is 1,000,000:1

vs the Epson which is 140,000:1

Optoma resolution 3840x2160

Epson resolution 1920x1080


Still leaning towards the Optoma UHD60 at this point.
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post #4 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 08:48 AM
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The Epson 4000 has significant powered lens shift with memory's so it can easily be placed on the ceiling without using any resolution robing digital keystone. The native and dynamic contrast of the Epson is better than the Optoma regardless of what the manufactures claims as all those numbers are just marketing double speak. The Epson is only 1/2 4K with a 1080p chip shifted 2X but has better color and HDR performance. The Optoma has a 1/2 4K chip shifted 2X for a full 4K image so it excels in resolution over the Epson for true 4K sources. You never want to use digital keystone as it degrades the image to a certain extent so if you can't mount the optoma in a location without using digital keystone the Epson is a better buy.

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post #5 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 09:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moneyisflying View Post
Thanks for the input! Looks like the Epson is a great value for sure. It seems by its side by side review other than a few areas, it is outperformed by the Optoma though. One area The Epson shines is the auto keystone function. There is no mention on if the Optoma has this or not, and I "Hope" it does as I want a square picture and mine will be mounted near the ceiling so this is one of those risks I may take by going down the Optoma road.



I think though the big items I want are going to be better suited by the optoma.



Contrast on the Optoma is 1,000,000:1



vs the Epson which is 140,000:1



Optoma resolution 3840x2160



Epson resolution 1920x1080





Still leaning towards the Optoma UHD60 at this point.


The Epson doesn’t need keystone as it has generous ( and motorized ) lens shift. The Optoma is limited to a small amount of vertical lens shift— I think 15% image height.

Ignore manufacturer’s claims for contrast. They are all 100% Grade A baloney.

Both the Epson and Optoma use pixel shifting to achieve their max resolution. The Epson is a native 1080p device (2m pixels) that doubles it’s resolution to around 4 million pixels— sharp but still half the resolution required to classify as ‘4K’. The Optoma, on the other hand, starts with a custom resolution of 2716x1528 (4m pixels) and doubles that to the full 8 million pixels to classify as 4K. So the Optoma will be noticeably sharper— depending on your screen size and viewing distance of course. The Epson compensates by throwing everything but the kitchen sink into the features list. In addition to the motorized lens and generous shift range it also has lens memory, CFI (but only for 1080p content), an auto iris to improve blacks, 3D compatibility, and a filter to improve DCI-P3 coverage. It also has fairly low input latency around 30ms. Strangely, it LACKS a full bandwidth HDMI so 4K/60 is not possible— perhaps an admission that this isn’t really a 4K projector on any sense of the word. The Optoma does have a full bandwidth HDMI but the one thing you’d want to use it for, gaming, is hampered by a rather mediocre input lag of around 56ms.

Both are big, both are relatively quiet, both are bright although the Epson measures a bit brighter despite it’s lower lumen rating— there’s those pesky made up numbers again.

If you want 4K, like actual 4K, the Optoma is the better choice. Conversely, if you want a really well equipped projector and you don’t mind sacrificing some resolution to get it then Epson is a great choice.

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post #6 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 09:42 AM
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Hey, I am a recent Optoma purchaser, so I am all for them. My picture looks outstanding. I think I would have really appreciated the high end features of the Epson if it would have fit in my situation. It is too tall to fit in my cubby hole in between my vent framing where I would mount it.

The things I took from the review were:

"The Epson HC 4000, while competitive in HDR, has a definite advantage in SDR." "So in the end, the picture for most 1080p sources tends to be brighter, cleaner, and higher in contrast on the HC 4000"

For HDR, " In general, on an image with a range of elements from dark areas to bright highlights, the two projectors typically show very similar contrast. They can actually switch back and forth as to which is the higher in contrast within a given scene."

"Certainly the difference in image resolution of a 4K source is insignificant, and far less than you'd expect from the two different light engine technologies."

If you read the comment section on the review as well, I noticed, "My major concern with your review is lack of color gamut and color accuracy info in either SDR or HDR modes. Assuming you didn't test either based on your comment. Why isn't the smaller REC.709 gamut of the UHD60 (which can ONLY be achieved 100% in its dimmest Reference mode) a negative factor for the UHD60 compared to the +100% DCI-P3 ultra wide gamut achievable in the HC4000 in its Cinema and Digital Cinema modes? (Based on my CalMAN 5 gamut tests using an XRITE i1 Pro spectrophotometer.) To most viewers, color saturation, accuracy, and contrast make a bigger impression than the minor differences between these two in resolution--and it's hard to miss the advantage shown by the Epson's +100% DCI-P3 gamut coverage."

For 2/3rds the cost of a UHD60, with some trade offs, it appears to me the Epson is a much higher end projector. For even better contrast the 5040UB is available at the high end of your price range as well. I think that one is more comparable to the Optoma UHD65.

I am not an expert, just been looking into a replacement for my W1070 the last month or so before picking up a UHD50. I am very limited by my mounting location, so not a lot of choices. Just enjoy talking about it at the moment and haven't read the forums on these particular projectors. So just bringing up thoughts and not looking for argument and definitely don't know if I am right!

From my looking for deals over the last month or so, if I could have fit it in my installation at a bit over your price range, I would have gone for a Benq LED HT9050 that was selling refurb for $2400 last month. That is a $9K projector. It doesn't do HDR, but I think HDR for projectors isn't that big of a deal. Like with TVs, HDR doesn't make a difference unless a TV has high enough brightness, projectors aren't that bright to begin with, so my thought is I would have gone for better quality SDR over HDR support.

Cheers and happy hunting!
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At 18’ and 150” screen lumens should be a high priority, especially if you are interested in HDR.


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post #8 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 09:47 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by rekbones View Post
The Epson 4000 has significant powered lens shift with memory's so it can easily be placed on the ceiling without using any resolution robing digital keystone. The native and dynamic contrast of the Epson is better than the Optoma regardless of what the manufactures claims as all those numbers are just marketing double speak. The Epson is only 1/2 4K with a 1080p chip shifted 2X but has better color and HDR performance. The Optoma has a 1/2 4K chip shifted 2X for a full 4K image so it excels in resolution over the Epson for true 4K sources. You never want to use digital keystone as it degrades the image to a certain extent so if you can't mount the optoma in a location without using digital keystone the Epson is a better buy.
Well, unfortunately, its not really possible to take multiple projectors home for a test spin and return them for free so I can only hope whatever I end up with does not need a keystone shift.

As for the manufacturers claims vs the actual capability, how could any accurate measures be done then if the factory specs are false? I guess if I had to chose between the Epsons better color and the Optoma's better resolution, I would prefer the higher resolution. My current color of my old dying Mitsubishi is more than acceptable, and I am confident both these will blow that out of the water. I am more looking for the resolution that is gained from the 4k than its color vibrancy (although in a perfect world it would be nice to have both).

From a glance, it would seem like the Epson 4010 would be slightly an upgrade from the 4000 with a higher contrast ratio and more lumens. But still (at least by the perhaps factor exaggerated numbers) it doesn't come close to the Optoma.

Are there any other options I should be considering? I need to find a replacement soon and want to make sure I am making the best decision.
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post #9 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 09:50 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by klimo View Post
At 18’ and 150” screen lumens should be a high priority, especially if you are interested in HDR.


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Normally it would be. However my theater room has no natural light coming in, so its quite dark. My current projector only has 1300 lumens and it does quite well. Not to say that more lumens wouldnt be bad. If nothing else I can run these in eco mode and really stretch the life of this next projector, but I don't think I need the lumen output that most would with it being in a living room with big windows.

Forgive the picture quality, as this is a quick picture from my phone, but it gives you an idea of the room.

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post #10 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 09:57 AM
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Normally it would be. However my theater room has no natural light coming in, so its quite dark. My current projector only has 1300 lumens and it does quite well. Not to say that more lumens wouldnt be bad. If nothing else I can run these in eco mode and really stretch the life of this next projector, but I don't think I need the lumen output that most would with it being in a living room with big windows.

Forgive the picture quality, as this is a quick picture from my phone, but it gives you an idea of the room.

I'm not sure what kind of screen you are running as gain will obviously play a role, but as far as HDR is concerned, you will most likely come up woefully short in lumens output at 2k, especially if you plan to run in eco mode. The optoma gets you up there with 3k output.

There are definite trade offs. If HDR is not a big deal for you then the Epson all the way.

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Originally Posted by sage11x View Post
The Epson doesn’t need keystone as it has generous ( and motorized ) lens shift. The Optoma is limited to a small amount of vertical lens shift— I think 15% image height.

Ignore manufacturer’s claims for contrast. They are all 100% Grade A baloney.

Both the Epson and Optoma use pixel shifting to achieve their max resolution. The Epson is a native 1080p device (2m pixels) that doubles it’s resolution to around 4 million pixels— sharp but still half the resolution required to classify as ‘4K’. The Optoma, on the other hand, starts with a custom resolution of 2716x1528 (4m pixels) and doubles that to the full 8 million pixels to classify as 4K. So the Optoma will be noticeably sharper— depending on your screen size and viewing distance of course. The Epson compensates by throwing everything but the kitchen sink into the features list. In addition to the motorized lens and generous shift range it also has lens memory, CFI (but only for 1080p content), an auto iris to improve blacks, 3D compatibility, and a filter to improve DCI-P3 coverage. It also has fairly low input latency around 30ms. Strangely, it LACKS a full bandwidth HDMI so 4K/60 is not possible— perhaps an admission that this isn’t really a 4K projector on any sense of the word. The Optoma does have a full bandwidth HDMI but the one thing you’d want to use it for, gaming, is hampered by a rather mediocre input lag of around 56ms.

Both are big, both are relatively quiet, both are bright although the Epson measures a bit brighter despite it’s lower lumen rating— there’s those pesky made up numbers again.

If you want 4K, like actual 4K, the Optoma is the better choice. Conversely, if you want a really well equipped projector and you don’t mind sacrificing some resolution to get it then Epson is a great choice.
Thanks for the input. The current latency on my Mitsubishi is about the same on the Optoma, and for the XBOX games I play, I have not noticed it enough to affect any of my game play, even on faster first person shooters. I do agree I think the Optoma has a better starting point.

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Originally Posted by RonBonnell View Post
Hey, I am a recent Optoma purchaser, so I am all for them. My picture looks outstanding. I think I would have really appreciated the high end features of the Epson if it would have fit in my situation. It is too tall to fit in my cubby hole in between my vent framing where I would mount it.

The things I took from the review were:

"The Epson HC 4000, while competitive in HDR, has a definite advantage in SDR." "So in the end, the picture for most 1080p sources tends to be brighter, cleaner, and higher in contrast on the HC 4000"

For HDR, " In general, on an image with a range of elements from dark areas to bright highlights, the two projectors typically show very similar contrast. They can actually switch back and forth as to which is the higher in contrast within a given scene."

"Certainly the difference in image resolution of a 4K source is insignificant, and far less than you'd expect from the two different light engine technologies."

If you read the comment section on the review as well, I noticed, "My major concern with your review is lack of color gamut and color accuracy info in either SDR or HDR modes. Assuming you didn't test either based on your comment. Why isn't the smaller REC.709 gamut of the UHD60 (which can ONLY be achieved 100% in its dimmest Reference mode) a negative factor for the UHD60 compared to the +100% DCI-P3 ultra wide gamut achievable in the HC4000 in its Cinema and Digital Cinema modes? (Based on my CalMAN 5 gamut tests using an XRITE i1 Pro spectrophotometer.) To most viewers, color saturation, accuracy, and contrast make a bigger impression than the minor differences between these two in resolution--and it's hard to miss the advantage shown by the Epson's +100% DCI-P3 gamut coverage."

For 2/3rds the cost of a UHD60, with some trade offs, it appears to me the Epson is a much higher end projector. For even better contrast the 5040UB is available at the high end of your price range as well. I think that one is more comparable to the Optoma UHD65.

I am not an expert, just been looking into a replacement for my W1070 the last month or so before picking up a UHD50. I am very limited by my mounting location, so not a lot of choices. Just enjoy talking about it at the moment and haven't read the forums on these particular projectors. So just bringing up thoughts and not looking for argument and definitely don't know if I am right!

From my looking for deals over the last month or so, if I could have fit it in my installation at a bit over your price range, I would have gone for a Benq LED HT9050 that was selling refurb for $2400 last month. That is a $9K projector. It doesn't do HDR, but I think HDR for projectors isn't that big of a deal. Like with TVs, HDR doesn't make a difference unless a TV has high enough brightness, projectors aren't that bright to begin with, so my thought is I would have gone for better quality SDR over HDR support.

Cheers and happy hunting!
You bring up some good points. I do feel like the HC 4000 is a great camera it seems. I just dont believe it to be quite as good in the areas I am looking for compared to the UHD60. I have also looked at the UHD65 and the 5040UB. But both are really at the top end of my budget, and throw tax and shipping in there and its really more than I can afford to spend, which leads me back to the Optoma UHD60 for now.

If I had the budget, I would love to step up to the Sony 4k projector with wild reviews going for about $4,000, but its just not in my price range (or even close).

I think whatever I end up with, will in the end be leaps and bounds better than what I have now, and I am very excited for that given I still feel impressed at times with my ancient 1080p Mitsubishi.
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post #12 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 10:07 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by klimo View Post
I'm not sure what kind of screen you are running as gain will obviously play a role, but as far as HDR is concerned, you will most likely come up woefully short in lumens output at 2k, especially if you plan to run in eco mode. The optoma gets you up there with 3k output.

There are definite trade offs. If HDR is not a big deal for you then the Epson all the way.
HDR is not as big of a deal as running the 4k will be. I can stream HDR from Netflix and Amazon Prime, but most times when I really want to sit down and enjoy something, its a movie, which will be in 4k.
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right now the 5040 is what you should look at. Look in deals found
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post #14 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 11:27 AM
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Well, unfortunately, its not really possible to take multiple projectors home for a test spin and return them for free so I can only hope whatever I end up with does not need a keystone shift. ...
It's actually not that hard to determine whether or not you would need to use digital keystone correction because it's called out in each projector model's specifications. Each projector has a specified height (without having lens shift) or range of heights (with lens shift) where it needs to be mounted in relation to the top of the screen to avoid using digital keystone correction.

If you can measure from the floor to the top of your screen's image area (not including the black screen border) and then measure from the floor to the center of your current projector's lens it will be pretty easy to calculate which projectors will work and which won't without having to bring all the projectors home to test

As already mentioned it's best to avoid using digital keystone correction wherever possible as it degrades image quality. If you're shopping for the best image quality possible within your limited budget then it makes no sense to throw some of that image quality away by using digital keystone correction.
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post #15 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 01:44 PM - Thread Starter
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If you can find me a 5040 for $1600, I'll gladly take it, lol.

Again, it's too far out of my price range. Cheapest I found was over $2k.

Thanks for the info on how to check if I would need a keystone function or not. I'll check it out!
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post #16 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 03:34 PM
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Here is an excellent third party calculator to determine if the projector will fit in your room without using any keystone correction. http://www.webprojectorcalculator.com/

It includes lens shift in the formulas and true lumen output for each model with tested specs not the manufacture double speak.

Edit: You have a really nice light controlled room there where a truly high contrast projector will shine, I would replace the lamp in your projector with a bare OEM bulb in your old housing and save my money up for a Epson 5040,the new Epson 5050 or even better a JVC. I would even buy a used JVC over the relatively low contrast DLP's.

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Last edited by rekbones; 12-26-2018 at 04:00 PM.
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… Thanks for the info on how to check if I would need a keystone function or not. I'll check it out!
Since your first choice right now is the Optoma UHD60 I took a look at its user manual online to check the chart that shows where the projector should be mounted, which varies with different screen sizes. For a 150" screen (which is close to your 147") the 15% vertical lens shift allows it to be mounted in a range from having the center of the lens even with the top of the screen's image area to as high as 11" above that. As long as your current mounting position is within that range you wouldn't need to use digital keystone correction.
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post #18 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 07:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Here is an excellent third party calculator to determine if the projector will fit in your room without using any keystone correction. http://www.webprojectorcalculator.com/

It includes lens shift in the formulas and true lumen output for each model with tested specs not the manufacture double speak.

Edit: You have a really nice light controlled room there where a truly high contrast projector will shine, I would replace the lamp in your projector with a bare OEM bulb in your old housing and save my money up for a Epson 5040,the new Epson 5050 or even better a JVC. I would even buy a used JVC over the relatively low contrast DLP's.
Thanks for that!

Initially the plan was to replace the bulb. Unfortunately, the OEM bulbs are discontinued for my projector and the aftermarket ones are junk according to all the reviews.

I looked more into the 5040, and from what I read, I honestly think the Optoma will fit what I am looking for more. Now, some of the JVC's are much better. And the Sony's are really incredible, but again, even refurbished are outside my budget and I need something now.
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… Thanks for the info on how to check if I would need a keystone function or not. I'll check it out!
Since your first choice right now is the Optoma UHD60 I took a look at its user manual online to check the chart that shows where the projector should be mounted, which varies with different screen sizes. For a 150" screen (which is close to your 147") the 15% vertical lens shift allows it to be mounted in a range from having the center of the lens even with the top of the screen's image area to as high as 11" above that. As long as your current mounting position is within that range you wouldn't need to use digital keystone correction.
Dude, thank you!

I looked a bit more and the only projector I think will be better than what I am getting is outside my budget here. I am in need of a replacement soon, so I felt comfortable with the help of this forum and some outside expertise to go ahead and order the Optoma. I got a brand new one shipped to my door for $1640. I feel like for what I am spending I will be pleasantly impressed over what I currently have.

Thanks everyone for all the great info and help!
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post #20 of 31 Old 12-26-2018, 11:32 PM
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Congratulations on making a decision and I do agree the Optoma's edge out the competition in the XPR DLP technology, I think you will be pleased. Please get back to us and let us know how it works out as everyone's opinion counts.

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post #21 of 31 Old 12-27-2018, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by moneyisflying View Post
If you can find me a 5040 for $1600, I'll gladly take it, lol.

Again, it's too far out of my price range. Cheapest I found was over $2k.

Thanks for the info on how to check if I would need a keystone function or not. I'll check it out!
sorry i thought you said $2000 was the budget and it is $99 over that pretty close
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let us know how you like the optoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madermat View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by moneyisflying View Post
If you can find me a 5040 for $1600, I'll gladly take it, lol.

Again, it's too far out of my price range. Cheapest I found was over $2k.

Thanks for the info on how to check if I would need a keystone function or not. I'll check it out!
sorry i thought you said $2000 was the budget and it is $99 over that pretty close
It was pretty close, but over the max still all the same. I had not planned this upgrade. If I had, I likely would have had a larger budget for sure. My projector on it's final leg is what has pushed me into this unexpectedly and thus why I am tight on my budget. At the same time, I wanted something good that I would be happy with for years to come. Price aside, from what I have researched, I honestly believe the Optoma will be the better projector for me.
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let us know how you like the optoma
Will do! I should have it in a week. I have already ordered some 4k HDMI cables and plan on getting a few 4k HD movies to be able to give it a proper test!
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It sounds as if the UHD60's vertical lens shift range fits your current mounting location. Looking forward to hearing what you think of its performance.
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Originally Posted by moneyisflying View Post
Thanks for that!

Initially the plan was to replace the bulb. Unfortunately, the OEM bulbs are discontinued for my projector and the aftermarket ones are junk according to all the reviews.

Too late now but for future reference you might check Projector Lamp Experts because they do have a pretty strong warranty and several on the forum have had good results with them.

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post #27 of 31 Old 12-30-2018, 07:57 AM - Thread Starter
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So the projector arrived early yesterday morning. I was super stoked and began the install. I was able to get it setup with little trouble. It fit the screen fine with no keystone usage.

Initial thoughts: WOW it's bright! This was in the default eco mode also. It's likely a combo of the fact I have a room with zero ambient light in it, and my previous projector only output 1300 lumens, but it's almost too bright.

I played a few videos I owned and I noticed some areas were so bright they were washing the true colors out. This could also have to do with my grey screen that I have.

Video quality: I only own 1 4k Ultra HD video (Oblivion). When I played it my 4k Blu Ray player said that I was not "currently hooked up to a 4k TV", even though all the inputs and outputs to everything through the HDMI are correct. I changed some settings from Auto to 4k and it did play fine and looked fantastic. However when I swapped the 4k version to the Blu Ray non 4k version it was hard for me at times to tell the difference.

Later, I streamed an episode of The Walking Dead via Netflix and I could see a LOT of black pixelation. Granted this is a non HD streaming service from Netflix, but I never noticed the pixilation like this before. And again the whites were too bright, and I didn't see a ton of color. Now, part of this is due to The Walking Dead not being a very colorful show and has a lot of dark colors and shadows most of the time anyways. I brought down the brightness (keep in mind I have not taken it out of eco mode yet) and that seemed to help a little.

Before the Walking Dead I put in a Disney movie for my kids to watch and when the opening screen opened up, even the white from the "Walt Disney" appeared, the white was so bright, it seemed to almost bleed white from letter to letter.

I hope and believe this is all due to me needing to fine tune things further. I don't remember doing this much at all with my old Mitsubishi. However I have a different Blu Ray player and a different receiver since then and so I literally now have 3 components that all are vairables to dial in to get things where they are the best.

I didn't have much more time yesterday to further tweak things.

Overall, I am happy. The biggest thing where I wanted this to shine was playing movies, and when I play the Blu Ray and 4k video, they are stellar (even though I do feel I should be able to see a larger difference in quality). I do feel like I need to play with the settings and adjustments more to further better the picture quality though.

I was pretty bummed when my old Mitsubishi made The Walking Dead look better than this new Optoma 4k did, but again, I think it may lie all in the tuning.

Anyone out there have some recommendations for settings?
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post #28 of 31 Old 12-30-2018, 03:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moneyisflying View Post
… Initial thoughts: WOW it's bright! This was in the default eco mode also. It's likely a combo of the fact I have a room with zero ambient light in it, and my previous projector only output 1300 lumens, but it's almost too bright. ...
New lamps are at their brightest and typically lose about 25% of their initial lumens after the first ~500 hours so that will help. Also, you may be in Bright mode which is not only super bright but doesn't have the best color balance. Below are the lumen readings projectorcentral.com measured in the various modes. You might want to read the whole review for some settings tips:

MODE ----- Bright/Eco
Cinema --- 1260/795
Vivid ------ 1591/1002
HDR ------- 1021/643
Bright ----- 2710/1707
Game ----- 1525/961
Reference - 515/325

projectorcentral.com/Optoma-UHD60-review.htm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moneyisflying View Post
So the projector arrived early yesterday morning. I was super stoked and began the install. I was able to get it setup with little trouble. It fit the screen fine with no keystone usage.

Initial thoughts: WOW it's bright! This was in the default eco mode also. It's likely a combo of the fact I have a room with zero ambient light in it, and my previous projector only output 1300 lumens, but it's almost too bright.

I played a few videos I owned and I noticed some areas were so bright they were washing the true colors out. This could also have to do with my grey screen that I have.

Video quality: I only own 1 4k Ultra HD video (Oblivion). When I played it my 4k Blu Ray player said that I was not "currently hooked up to a 4k TV", even though all the inputs and outputs to everything through the HDMI are correct. I changed some settings from Auto to 4k and it did play fine and looked fantastic. However when I swapped the 4k version to the Blu Ray non 4k version it was hard for me at times to tell the difference.

Later, I streamed an episode of The Walking Dead via Netflix and I could see a LOT of black pixelation. Granted this is a non HD streaming service from Netflix, but I never noticed the pixilation like this before. And again the whites were too bright, and I didn't see a ton of color. Now, part of this is due to The Walking Dead not being a very colorful show and has a lot of dark colors and shadows most of the time anyways. I brought down the brightness (keep in mind I have not taken it out of eco mode yet) and that seemed to help a little.

Before the Walking Dead I put in a Disney movie for my kids to watch and when the opening screen opened up, even the white from the "Walt Disney" appeared, the white was so bright, it seemed to almost bleed white from letter to letter.

I hope and believe this is all due to me needing to fine tune things further. I don't remember doing this much at all with my old Mitsubishi. However I have a different Blu Ray player and a different receiver since then and so I literally now have 3 components that all are vairables to dial in to get things where they are the best.

I didn't have much more time yesterday to further tweak things.

Overall, I am happy. The biggest thing where I wanted this to shine was playing movies, and when I play the Blu Ray and 4k video, they are stellar (even though I do feel I should be able to see a larger difference in quality). I do feel like I need to play with the settings and adjustments more to further better the picture quality though.

I was pretty bummed when my old Mitsubishi made The Walking Dead look better than this new Optoma 4k did, but again, I think it may lie all in the tuning.

Anyone out there have some recommendations for settings?


I’d head over to the UHd60 owners thread and ask your questions there. The ‘washing out’ issue could be a result of the contrast being set too high. Or it could be an HDR compatibility thing. Again, UHd60 owners should be able to advise you.

Also: you did confirm your HDMI cable was capable of 4K/60, right? Because most long HDMI runs you would have bought in the last few years won’t be...

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post #30 of 31 Old 12-31-2018, 04:49 AM - Thread Starter
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I'm such a newb. There are 2 HDMI ports, and I plugged into the standard one. Not the HDCP 2.2 which is needed for 4k playing. This will be a good start!

Thanks for the info! I believe I am in Cinema mode which would explain why it's bright. I found a good YouTube video going over how to fine tune your settings on my Optima UHD60. So, I'll start there.

If I'm still having less than stellar results, I'll check into the UHD60 owners thread.
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