InFocus 4805 Dust Blob Pictorial Cleaning Guide - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 77 Old 07-05-2005, 09:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Summary of steps / instructions:

1) Remove the Focus and Zoom rings.

2) Remove the front grill.

3) Remove the lens assembly.

4) Use compressed air to blow out the speck of dusts causing the dust blobs to appear on the screen. (Please be VERY careful of condensation, dripping, and impurities from canned compressed air.)

5) Reassemble everything.


The first 2 pictures show the "before" shot with the dust blobs. The last picture shows the screen after cleaning. The projector is only 8" from screen when I took these pictures (that is why they are out of focus, but the blobs are much easier to see). You can also project onto a piece of paper about 8" away.


*** BEFORE ***






*** AFTER ***





I used the tweezers to lasso the string around the focus and zoom rings. Also, a *magnetic* screwdriver is highly recommended. Note: I already have the rings removed in the below picture.




The small CO2 spray is cleaner, but weak. The can spray is powerful, but may contain impurities. Follow JeffBK's suggestion to test the spray on a mirror first (see post 19 below).




I came up with the idea to lasso the rings with a string and pull, rather than prying it with a screwdriver and risk scuff marks.




There are 3 locking tabs per ring. Use the lasso to pull one *tab* at a time. Do not attempt to pull the entire ring at once. It would be too tightly held. I borrowed D-Train's idea to mark the position of the rings with tape before disassembly.










Below, you can see the 3 tabs holding each of the rings.




Last edited by SuperGoop; 01-14-2015 at 07:49 AM.
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post #2 of 77 Old 07-05-2005, 10:00 PM - Thread Starter
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The lens with the rings removed. You can now see the 3 screws holding the lens assembly.




Remove the 2 screws on the underside holding the front grill.






Shine flashlight through grill to look for the 2 locking tabs (1 on each side), plus 1 more to the right of the lens.




Use small spoon to press down (do not pry) to *easily* release each tab. No need to pry or use force. If you have to use force, you are doing it wrong!







There is no need to remove the light housing. I recommend leaving it in, so that you can run a quick test before final reassembly. However, I recommend removing it if your lamp filter is very dirty.




Notice the grill deflects the hot exhaust away from the light path.




Remove the 3 screws holding the lens assembly.




The rainbow colour DMD mirror is now exposed. It is now most vulnerable. CAREFUL not to disturb the dust around you; move slowly, don't breath, don't even blink! If your house is dusty, vacuum and let the air settle before removing the lens assembly. CAUTION: Do NOT use portable vacuums. Fine dust will escape from the filter bag and contaminate the area.


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post #3 of 77 Old 07-05-2005, 10:03 PM - Thread Starter
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Notice the speck of dust on the mirror! Blow it out with compressed air. You will need the straw extension. Also, blow away any dust on the thick lens, and another large mirror opposite to the DMD mirror (not shown). However, I think only dusts on the DMD mirror will cause blobs on the screen. WARNING: Make sure the projector is *completely* cooled (not even slightly warm). Compressed air is cold. Warm glass + cold air = crack!

I suggest testing it again before you snap the grill and rings back on, just in case you missed a spot. CAUTION: If you re-test it, make sure you let a cool down *completely* again before any further cleaning.






This is the lens assembly. It is a sealed unit with rotating zoom and focus. It is greasy. Careful not to get the grease on your fingers or the lens. I recommend washing your hands with soap immediately after removal.






You can also use this procedure to expose and clean the BACK side of the colour wheel. CAUTION: The colour wheel is VERY fragile. If you press too hard during cleaning, a glass segment may break off. I recommend NOT touching it.






FINISHED! NO MORE DUST BLOBS!!!

As they say... "A Picture Speaks a Thousand Words". I hope this pictorial guide is self-explanatory. Please feel free to ask me any questions. Special thanks to everybody who has posted before me (JeffKB, D-Train, Cummings66, etc... there were many more) who inspired me to proceed with the procedure and to take these photos in hopes of helping others.

My lasso idea with the string works very well for pulling the focus and zoom rings out. I prefer this method to using a screwdriver to pry out the rings.

Disclaimer: This procedure will void your warranty and may damage your projector. Proceed at your own risk.

Also check out my colour wheel cleaning guide here.


Colour Wheel - BEFORE (notice the haze)



Colour Wheel - PARTIALLY CLEANED with alcohol and Q-Tips



Colour Wheel - CLEANED



SuperGoop

Last edited by SuperGoop; 01-14-2015 at 08:00 AM.
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post #4 of 77 Old 07-05-2005, 10:45 PM
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SuperGoob,

NICE POST!!

I wish people who has done this to their SP5700 would do the same (post some pics), as I am having dust fibre in the optic and am not game enough to take the thing apart, as I just don't know how it goes together, need a service manual here may be...

Any SP5700 owners?

K
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post #5 of 77 Old 07-05-2005, 11:20 PM
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SuperGoop - congratulations on the successful cleaning and the outstanding pictures! I wish I had this thread available to me before I cleaned my dust blobs - it would have been a lot less stressful.

Even though there's been a lot of postings describing the procedure, yours is the first that has included detailed photos (at least AFAIK). Between the many detailed written accounts of the cleaning procedure and your pictures, anyone planning on doing the procedure should have an excellent idea of what to expect and what to do.

Nice job.
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post #6 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 06:20 AM
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Awsome. Now I hope I never need to use it!

Panny UB820, Denon X6300H in 6.1.4 mode, Epson 5040UB, SVS PCUltra paired with a MiniDSP HD and BEQ (of course!)
Working on making things blacker...
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post #7 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 07:22 AM
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I will be saving this thread for the day I hope never comes...

Thank-U for taking the time to help out your AVS Brothers & Sisters.

HH
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post #8 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 07:31 AM
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Thanks Goop -- great shots, great service to the 4805 community.


P4 HTPC, Infocus 4805, nVidia GeForce 6800 pixel mapped, Theater Tek 2.2, Bluegears X-Mystique 7.1 Soundcard, HK AVR-55 A/V receiver.
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post #9 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 07:50 AM
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Goop thanks, this will go in my subscribed list for the day I have to clean mine, and you're right a picture is worth a thousand words, hopefully the process won't be as intimidating with these instructions.
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post #10 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 07:51 AM
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Very nice work!! Thank you for putting this together!! I followed JeffKB during his dust removal process, and was hoping for some step by step photos. And now you have put togethr the MOST complete guide to dust removal for the 4805!!

Thanks again!!

Sean

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post #11 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 08:50 AM
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Outstanding Gump!

Do not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
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post #12 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 09:12 AM
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Nice Job! Hope I NEVER have to come back to this thread for instructions, but nice to know it will be there if I do.

-Redbird
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post #13 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 03:26 PM
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Thanks for the picture tutorial Goop! I have a couple of pictures in my gallery that show just how much of an improvement this procedure can make. You can tell just how much detail is included in your post because there is not a single reply yet that asks for more info.
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post #14 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 05:13 PM
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Would the lasso idea work better with 3 of them at 120 degrees from each other? Just a thought.

Great post, thank you for sharing your work!
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post #15 of 77 Old 07-06-2005, 06:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone for your positive responses. If anyone tries the procedure, please let us know how it goes. Feel free to add your suggestions to improve the technique.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quaid View Post

Would the lasso idea work better with 3 of them at 120 degrees from each other? Just a thought.

My short answer is 'no'. I actually thought about that and tried adding another lasso and pulling both at the same time. This created 2 issues:

1) The space was tight to have 2 set of strings together. I doubt 3 sets will fit, especially for the zoom ring. I tried using thinner strings, but they were too weak and snapped easily.

2) It is easier to release 1 tab at a time. The tabs are fairly tight. Pulling one tab is easier than tackling all 3 at the same time. The force will be too great, and I may damage the lens assembly. It is better to pick them off one by one.

Thanks for the suggestion.
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post #16 of 77 Old 07-11-2005, 10:31 AM - Thread Starter
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Here is an intersting excerpt concerning dust blobs and the Sanyo PLV-Z3 (source: http://www.projectorcentral.com/sanyo_plv-z3.htm):

"One problem that can occur on any projector that does not have a sealed light engine is that dust particles can settle on the LCD panels. When a dust particle lands on and sticks to an LCD panel, it will produce a small, fuzzy spot on the projected image. When owners of projectors have a dusty environment and/or do not perform regular filter cleaning maintenance, they may need to send their units in for cleaning periodically to eliminate dust.

Sanyo has come up with a novel solution to this problem on the Z3. There are three tiny holes in the bottom of the casework that remain sealed in normal operation. However should a dust particle settle on an LCD panel, the user may remove the seals and insert a hand-pump blower (included with the product) that will dislodge any dust. After this operation, the seals are easily replaced and you are back in business."


That sounds like a pretty good idea. More projector should have this feature.

I have also added more commentary to my original post, so I thought I'd bump it up.

Thanks.
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post #17 of 77 Old 07-11-2005, 01:02 PM
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Thank you for posting this. I have two dust blobs but not on the screen itself, one of these days I will clean them out when I get the b_ _ _ _ to try this.
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post #18 of 77 Old 07-19-2005, 12:33 AM
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Is there a "better" can-type compressed air to look for? What do camera people use?
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post #19 of 77 Old 07-20-2005, 10:49 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoked View Post

Is there a "better" can-type compressed air to look for? What do camera people use?

Some (maybe all) of the common compressed air says "not recommended on camera mirrors". I have updated my original post under picture #4 to give credit to JeffKB for suggesting we test the compressed air against a mirror to ensure the spray is 100% clean. Below is what JeffKB wrote in the 4805 Official Thread (post # 11204):

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffKB View Post

At this point, the biggest disaster that could happen is that you spray some compressed air and a bunch of liquid shoots out. That would definitely ruin your day and certainly provide for The Moment Of Terror #3. So let's avoid doing that. How you ask? Well, what I did was to first spray the compressed air on a mirror. After verifying the mirror was still clean, I then moved the compressed air canister over to the PJ without tilting the canister in any direction.

The compressed air I used is called Air Doctor Blaster Co2, and it's for sale at Staples. So far it's worked well for me and it's oil free. Here is a link:
http://www.staples.com/Catalog/Brows...me=Air+Dusters

To answer your question, the CO2 canister is "supposed" to be the puriest and is what camera people use. However, the air seems to condense if you spray too long (maybe it is colder). Also, it is very hard to find in my area, but you should be able to buy it from camera stores. It cost 3-4 times more than regular compressed air. I started with it, but found it to be too weak, so I ended up using a the big canned air as well, following JeffBK's suggestion to test it on a mirror first.

My recommendation is just to use regular canned air, but be sure to following JeffKB's suggestion.
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post #20 of 77 Old 07-22-2005, 10:39 PM
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F$%K. Can't get that front grill off. The one right of the lense popped off easy but I can't get at the other two. =(

UPDATE: Damn, that took awhile. I eventually used a hairpin to pop the tabs. It was virtually impossible to see the tabs through the front grill. I had to kinda hold the bottem of the front grill away from the unit while shining a flashlight through the gap and put the pj on it's side.
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post #21 of 77 Old 07-23-2005, 02:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoked View Post

It was virtually impossible to see the tabs through the front grill. I had to kinda hold the bottem of the front grill away from the unit while shining a flashlight through the gap and put the pj on it's side.

I used the flashlight to locate one tab at a time. Once I saw where it was, without moving the projector, I used the spoon to blindly press and release the tab. The space is too tight to insert the spoon and still see the tab.

Once you've located the tab, you'll have to release it by "feel". You won't be able to see it with the spoon in the way.
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post #22 of 77 Old 07-23-2005, 03:21 PM
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Be very careful with your compressed air! I bought some that was for "optical equipment" etc. I sprayed it a few times not very hard. Seemed ok. However, I was cleaning the outside lense I sprayed a little harder and something sprayed onto the lense! I can't seem to wipe it off completely but it doesn't seem to affect the pq. No dust blobs anymore though!
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post #23 of 77 Old 07-26-2005, 12:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoked View Post

No dust blobs anymore though!

Congratulations on another success story!
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post #24 of 77 Old 08-02-2005, 06:44 AM
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More extensive cleaning:

(sorry, pictures next time I have to do this)

I made the mistake of blowing compressed air into the empty cavity where the lamp assembly goes one of the times I was cleaning my air filters. Big mistake. I ended up with a few dozen dust blobs. I did the procedure (very nice work on that!), but the back side of the large convex lens was filthy, as was the glass mirror at the front bottom right. The only way to really get to those is to take the top of the unit off.

1) Do everything above to get the lens out and front panel off.

2) Remove the two silver bottom screws on the back panel (these are similar to the ones on the front panel).

3) Remove the three screws on the jack panel. Two are by the component and composite / audio RCA jacks. The other is by the S-Video connector.

4) Get the back panel off by any trick you can (Spoon trick, etc.) There are three clips like those in the front, fairly evenly spaced across the back.

5) Flip the unit on its back and remove the 4 deep seated screws on the left and right edges (two on each side). These hold the top cover to the bottom through long shafts.

6) Carefully and somewhat evenly lift the top cover off, but be very careful as the control panel and built-in speaker are tethered to the rest of the unit via their data / audio cables. I recommend doing this on a bathroom / vanity counter with a mirror. Orient the unit so that it would be projecting on the mirror (away from you). Lift the lens end of the top cover up and watch in the mirror as you lift it toward you carefully. You will see the cables - make sure you don't yank on them. Flip the lid of the unit back and lay it upside down (like opening up a clam shell without breaking the two shells apart).

7) Above the light path, there is a metal cover. There are two black screws in the corners on the top part of this metal cover. There is another black screw down towards the color wheel. Carefully remove these and make sure you don't lose the washers on them. The metal cover has holes and alignment pins - you may have to get a fingernail or two between the metal and the plastic to pop this off.

8) You will now be looking down at the large convex (plastic!) lens and the angled glass mirror. You will notice that the large convex lens is held in place by metal clips. From this angle, you can clean the back of the large convex lens and get a good stream of air at the glass mirror. If, however, your stuff is so dirty that all you end up doing is moving dust around, then you need to go a step further (go to #9). Otherwise, reassemble everything in reverse order (skip to #14 for instructions) and enjoy!

9) Really Dirty: The metal clip holding the large convex lens in place is very easy to lift and disengage, but watch out as there is nothing holding it up through its holes in the assembly. It will fall down (but not through - phew!). You could try to secure it, but that may be more trouble than it is worth. Note how the bends in the clip are all pressed against the wings of the lens. It is possible to re-clip it at an angle such that only the top bends in the lamp side clip against the lens wings. You don't want to do this. Take a mental picture!

10) After uncliping the large convex lens, remove it and clean it. I actually used my lens cleaning kit for my sunglasses (available at "Sunglass Hut" or other sunglass stores). This kit consists of lens cleaning fluid, suitable for glass or plastic eye glass lens, and a microfiber cleaning cloth. After blowing off big dust with air, I sprayed both sides of the large convex lens and the cleaned it with the microfiber cloth. Do not stare at (through) that lens too directly or long - it will seriously give you eyestrain. To see how clean the lens is, turn off the lights and shine a flashlight at it obliquely (so that you get a reflection off the surface, not through the lens - remember that angle of incidence stuff from physics?) Make sure you don't leave any fingerprints on this lens - your skin oils will heat up on the lens and cause uneven heating, resulting in deformations / pitting in the lens. Once it is clean, set it aside. I also used this cloth on the main lens assembly (front and back) during the cleaning. Do not spray directly on that lens as some of the cleaning fluid could hit the lubricated areas of the lens assembly and react poorly. Spray the cloth and then wipe.

11) Before you put the large convex lens back in, clean the glass mirror (you will have more room to do this without the other one there). DO NOT spray directly on this lens, as it may bounce through the chassis and land somewhere you don't see. Instead, spray a bit on your microfiber cloth and then wipe the mirror down, and then go back with the dry part of the cloth. You should be able to get this mirror spotless in this manor.

12) If you continue to stare down at this thing, you will notice that the light from the lamp goes through the color wheel and then through a light pipe and is emitted from the end of that pipe, bouncing off the glass mirror and being manipulated through the large convex lens to eventually hit the DMD. I noticed the emitting end of my light pipe was awfully dirty too, so I cleaned it as well. I sprayed my microfiber cloth and wiped it clean (just like I did with the glass mirror).

13) Put the large convex lens back in. Notice that there is a chunk missing from it - that goes towards the lamp. There is a key peg that should nestle in on the top outer wing (toward the top of the projector, farthest from the lamp). Get the clip up and over the lens and make sure all the bends are pressing against the wings. I used a couple of tweezers to get it back up in place, and then used clean fingers to get it snapped in place. Be careful not to touch the large convex lens that you just made so clean! If you do, clean it again!!!!

14) Put the metal cover back on - make sure all the alignment pegs go back in their holes before you start screwing things. Don't lose those screws! I made sure I blew off this metal cover lest it dump a bunch of dust on my nice clean optics.

15) Flip the top cover back on and snug it back into place. Make sure it is clean first so you don't dump a pile of dust back in your optics. Screw the 4 screws back in their deep shafts.

16) Snap the rear panel back on. Screw the three panel mount screws back in. Screw the bottoms screws back in. Now you are back to the other procedure.


End result:
My picture is amazingly crisp and clean. The uniformity of the dust throughout the system was causing all sorts of light issues (hot spots / blobs / dark spots). My picture actually seem a tad brighter.

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post #25 of 77 Old 08-17-2005, 12:08 AM
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Quick question. If I have a dustblob outside of the actual 16x9 image, does that mean that I just need to mess with the lens? Or is it possible that the dust is on the mirror? I'd like to mess with the mirror as little as possible. Perhaps I'll just wait to do this until I get some more blobs and it's on the actual image. Man, this sucks. As much as I love the 4805, I think I'll go for a sealed optics model next time, or at least one that provides a legit method (doesn't void warranty) of getting rid of those little blobs.
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post #26 of 77 Old 08-17-2005, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anubis2005X View Post

Quick question. If I have a dustblob outside of the actual 16x9 image, does that mean that I just need to mess with the lens? Or is it possible that the dust is on the mirror? I'd like to mess with the mirror as little as possible. Perhaps I'll just wait to do this until I get some more blobs and it's on the actual image. Man, this sucks. As much as I love the 4805, I think I'll go for a sealed optics model next time, or at least one that provides a legit method (doesn't void warranty) of getting rid of those little blobs.

Sorry, those are most likely on the mirror. For whatever reason dust blobs on the mirror show up both inside and outside of the projected image. The good news is that this procedure will get rid of them.
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post #27 of 77 Old 08-18-2005, 11:57 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anubis2005X View Post

As much as I love the 4805, I think I'll go for a sealed optics model next time, or at least one that provides a legit method (doesn't void warranty) of getting rid of those little blobs.

In hindsight, I am glad I have the 4805 because don't have to worry about dust blobs and dirty colour wheels anymore. For me, these are DIY'able repairs on the 4805.

Even "sealed optics" may get dust blobs over time. At least with the 4805, I can how clean them myself.

I do agree that all projectors should have a simple user method of cleaning out dust blobs, similar to the Sanyo Z3.
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post #28 of 77 Old 08-18-2005, 01:11 PM
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This is just what I've been looking for. I've been putting up with dust blobs on my 4805 for a couple of months now. After reading the above, I had my projector dissambled, cleaned out, and reassembled in 30minutes start-to-finish!

Couple of things...

1) I didn't need to mark the positions of the focus and zoom wheels because it's pretty obvious where they go.
2) I never got the "lasso" method to work. I wound up popping them off with a screw driver.
3) After flipping the projector on its back and taking out the 2 screw on the bottom, I found I could open up the front plate enough to see the locking tabs directly. This made popping them open with a thin knife blade (inserted through the vent slits in the front) a snap.
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post #29 of 77 Old 08-19-2005, 01:20 AM
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Originally Posted by SuperGoop View Post

In hindsight, I am glad I have the 4805 because don't have to worry about dust blobs and dirty colour wheels anymore. For me, these are DIY'able repairs on the 4805.

Even "sealed optics" may get dust blobs over time. At least with the 4805, I can how clean them myself.

I do agree that all projectors should have a simple user method of cleaning out dust blobs, similar to the Sanyo Z3.


Really? I didn't know "sealed optics" projectors could suffer from dust blobs. Then again, the 4805 is my first projector, I'm a newbie. Thanks again by the way for this great tutorial. I do have a couple blobs I'd like to get rid of. I'm just afraid of voiding my warranty or something.
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post #30 of 77 Old 08-19-2005, 09:06 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Anubis2005X View Post

Really? I didn't know "sealed optics" projectors could suffer from dust blobs.

I have only read that it is possible to still get dust blobs on sealed optics, although the risk is greatly reduced. I really don't know for certain.

A small amount of dust is trapped inside the seal optics during manufacturing. However, it may not be detected by Quality Control if it is not actually on the LCD/DLP mirror.

Over time, the sealed optics unit is moved, tossed-and-turned during cleaning and lamp replacements, subjected to extreme heat and cooling, condensation, evaporation, etc. Eventually, the dust may be dislodged onto the LCD/DLP mirror.

Sealed units may not allow new dust to get in, but some amount of dust may already be inside the optics before it gets sealed.
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