Klipsch Reference Premiere HD Wireless System with WiSA - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 08:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Klipsch Reference Premiere HD Wireless System with WiSA

During a recent trip to Klipsch headquarters in Indianapolis, I had a chance to hear the WiSA-enabled surround system the company first announced at CES 2015. Unlike the brief demos I usually hear at shows, this audition was held in a dedicated, quiet room. Crucially, I had full control over the demo, including the volume. The experience left me more enthused about the potential of WiSA (Wireless Speaker and Audio Association) than ever.


I took a trip to Klipsch HQ in Indianapolis.

I first heard a WiSA-enabled surround system—from Bang & Olufsen—at CES 2014, and the impression left by the sound quality I experienced that day has stuck with me for two years. However, the cost of that system was steep—$25,000 for four speakers and a sub. At the time, I wished for a system that offered the precision and dynamics of the B&O rig, but at a price that was more approachable.

Fast forward to October 2015, when I had a chance to visit Klipsch and see the company's R&D facilities. Based on what I heard there, Klipsch has brought the cost of a high-performance wireless surround system down to earth. There are five self-powered speakers in the new WiSA-enabled line, and all of them are priced under a grand.

The RP-440WF floorstanding speaker ($999 each) is a slim tower that features four 4.5" woofers in a tapered array—the two woofers closest to the tweeter are crossed over at 1800 Hz, while the two lower woofers are crossed over at 200 Hz. The tweeter is a 1-inch titanium dome mounted in Klipsch's signature Tractrix horn. Frequency response is rated from 45 Hz to 25,000 Hz, and the speaker is powered by 125 watts of amplification (250W peak).


Klipsch's Reference Premiere HD WiSA wireless speaker system.

Klipsch's RP-440WC center-channel speaker ($799 each) has a low-profile cabinet—similar to a soundbar—and the same complement of drivers as the tower model. Indeed, the center also features precisely the same specs as the tower, so it's a perfect match. It also uses a tapered driver array, crossing over the two outermost woofers at 200 Hz and the woofers closest to the tweeter at 1800 Hz. As with the tower, frequency response is rated from 45 Hz to 25,000 Hz, and the speaker is powered by 125 watts of amplification (250W peak).

Rounding out the speaker lineup is the RP-140WM monitor ($999/pair). This compact bookshelf-style speaker uses a two-way design that pairs the same Tractrix horn tweeter found on the towers and center with a single 4.5" woofer. The rated frequency response extends from 60 Hz to 25,000 Hz, and it is powered by a 50-watt amp (100W peak).

No surround-speaker system would be complete without a subwoofer. Klipsch offers the wireless RP-110WSW sub ($799 each) that has a 10" driver mounted in a ported cabinet. The specified frequency response is 27 Hz to 125 Hz, and power is rated at 200 watts (400W peak).

The brains behind this WiSA-enabled system is the RP-HUB1 Control Center ($499 each). It offers four HDMI inputs (one is HDMI 2.0 with HDCP 2.2), Bluetooth, digital optical and coaxial audio inputs, analog stereo RCA audio inputs, and surround-sound processing, and it creates its own 7.1-channel hi-res audio wireless network using WiSA technology. The system supports audio resolutions up to 24-bit/192 kHz for 2-channel and 6-channel content, and 24-bit/96 kHz for 8-channel content. You can use the Control Center in conjunction with a pre/pro or AVR, but it's also capable of running a system on its own—all you need to add are source devices.

The Reference Premiere HD 7.1-channel system I heard featured the towers and the center up front, and four of the monitors acting as surrounds. It also featured dual subwoofers, which were placed up front against the wall. It's worth noting that you can use multiple subwoofers with the WiSA system, but you are limited to a single distance (timing) adjustment.


The back of each speaker has a foolproof interface that lets you assign it to a channel.

What I heard during that demo set a new standard for price versus performance in wireless audio—with a strong emphasis on performance. This is not just some lifestyle audio system, it's a hard-hitting, home theater-worthy powerhouse that offers crisp, dynamic sound reproduction.

Freed of the usual constraints of the show floor at CES—where exceeding 85 dB during a demo can earn an exhibitor an infraction—I spent quality time at Klipsch's facility blasting music through the system. It brought out the thrilling dynamics in tracks like "Drums Stop, No Good" from the album VTT2: Vital Tech Tones, Vol. 2. I also fed it Massive Attack, Adrian Sherwood, and Daft Punk (from the Tron: Legacy soundtrack).

Of course, I also checked out some multichannel Blu-ray content on the system. Make no mistake, this is proper home-theater sound—no soundbar or Sonos-like wireless system can do what this Klipsch WiSA system is capable of when it comes to fidelity and sheer output. Wireless or not, it is a powerful surround system that delivers a true home-theater experience to the listener.

Speaking of power and performance, one of the best things about self-powered speakers is that they don't share a single power supply, unlike the amps in a multichannel AVR that can experience a drop in per-channel output when all channels are blaring, as in an action scene during a movie. Wireless speaker systems avoid this trap because each speaker features a discrete amplifier with its own power supply. That means you get full output from each speaker with all channels driven.

The slender towers are rather deceptive in that you hardly get a sense of how powerful they really are—AV fanatics who crave a high-performance system that looks good and sets up in 10 minutes are bound to be thrilled with this system's spousal-acceptance factor. And yet, without question, one of the main selling points of this system is its raw power and fantastic fidelity. It really is the best of both worlds. The only thing missing at this point is an 11.2-channel Atmos-compatible variant; hopefully, such a system is in the cards for the future.

Typically, my home studio is a mess of wires because I'm constantly swapping out speakers and electronics for the sake of writing reviews. I literally can't wait for the day when wireless, self-powered speakers are the norm, and passive wired speakers are considered an anachronism. Thanks to its attractive pricing and aggressive performance, this WiSA-enabled speaker system is a crucial step toward that goal.

The Klipsch Reference Premiere HD wireless speakers will be available at Magnolia stores starting this January. Way to go Klipsch, and way to go WiSA.
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Last edited by imagic; 12-31-2015 at 10:01 AM.
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post #2 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 10:48 AM
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Interesting. It's a hair over $5000 for a 5.1 setup using all this gear. Does the WiSA standard allow interoperability of components from manufacturers, or are you locked into Klipsch gear effectively? Also does the RP-HUB1 perform any room correction/equalization of the speakers? You mentioned that using multiple subwoofers can only get one distance adjustment, so it must have some basic correction built in.

Also, I feel like this might be a toss up for ease of wiring use depending on where your outlets in your room are. I have an old house and my current setup is in a room with just a single outlet -- I'd have to run extension cords all over the place to use the WiSA gear! But then again there are house's like my sister's old place that had an outlet almost every 2-3 feet along the walls, so this would have been super easy to install there.
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post #3 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
...
The brains behind this WiSA-enabled system is the RP-HUB1 Control Center ($499 each). It offers four HDMI inputs (one is HDMI 2.0 with HDCP 2.2), Bluetooth, digital optical and coaxial audio inputs, analog stereo RCA audio inputs, and surround-sound processing, and it creates its own 7.1-channel hi-res audio wireless network using WiSA technology. The system supports audio resolutions up to 24-bit/192 kHz for 2-channel and 6-channel content, and 24-bit/96 kHz for 8-channel content. You can use the Control Center in conjunction with a pre/pro or AVR, but it's also capable of running a system on its own—all you need to add are source devices...
Can you elaborate on how you would use this in conjunction with pre/pro or AVR?

If you connect it between your source devices and your pre/pro or AVR then the pre/pro or AVR becomes useless, unless you have another set of passive speakers connected to it. And you wouldn't benefit from any features your pre/pro or AVR might offer, such as room correction, base management, etc. as the WiSA control center would have to come after them.

So, the most logical thing would be to put your pre/pro or AVR between your source devices and the control center. But, how would you connect them? Afaik, all pre/pro's and AVR's simply passthru the audio untouched if you connect a device to their HDMI output(s). I know that's the case with Zone 2/3 HDMI Outs and I'm pretty sure it applies to the HDMI Monitor outputs as well (assuming you have adjusted the setting to allow them to pass audio out).

Am I missing something or does it seem like the control center would need multichannel analog inputs to get the most of using it in conjunction with a pre/pro or AVR? Or, you'd need a pre/pro or AVR capable out outputting processed audio over HDMI.
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post #4 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 11:49 AM - Thread Starter
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Can you elaborate on how you would use this in conjunction with pre/pro or AVR?

If you connect it between your source devices and your pre/pro or AVR then the pre/pro or AVR becomes useless, unless you have another set of passive speakers connected to it. And you wouldn't benefit from any features your pre/pro or AVR might offer, such as room correction, base management, etc. as the WiSA control center would have to come after them.

So, the most logical thing would be to put your pre/pro or AVR between your source devices and the control center. But, how would you connect them? Afaik, all pre/pro's and AVR's simply passthru the audio untouched if you connect a device to their HDMI output(s). I know that's the case with Zone 2/3 HDMI Outs and I'm pretty sure it applies to the HDMI Monitor outputs as well (assuming you have adjusted the setting to allow them to pass audio out).

Am I missing something or does it seem like the control center would need multichannel analog inputs to get the most of using it in conjunction with a pre/pro or AVR? Or, you'd need a pre/pro or AVR capable out outputting processed audio over HDMI.
I understand what you are saying. Yeah, you would not be able to use AVR or pre/pro processing features with this system—those devices would act like a big HDMI switch and not much more.

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Last edited by imagic; 12-31-2015 at 12:30 PM.
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post #5 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by zim2411 View Post
Interesting. It's a hair over $5000 for a 5.1 setup using all this gear. Does the WiSA standard allow interoperability of components from manufacturers, or are you locked into Klipsch gear effectively? Also does the RP-HUB1 perform any room correction/equalization of the speakers? You mentioned that using multiple subwoofers can only get one distance adjustment, so it must have some basic correction built in.

Also, I feel like this might be a toss up for ease of wiring use depending on where your outlets in your room are. I have an old house and my current setup is in a room with just a single outlet -- I'd have to run extension cords all over the place to use the WiSA gear! But then again there are house's like my sister's old place that had an outlet almost every 2-3 feet along the walls, so this would have been super easy to install there.
I'm pretty sure that one of the requirements to use the WiSA logo is compatibility with other WiSA gear.
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post #6 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 03:30 PM
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Do they have any plans to add Atmos/DTS-X to this type of system?

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post #7 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 04:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Do they have any plans to add Atmos/DTS-X to this type of system?
Those will be the first words out of my mouth when I visit the Klipsch booth at CES next week.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
During a recent trip to Klipsch headquarters in Indianapolis, I had a chance to hear the WiSA-enabled surround system the company first announced at CES 2015. Unlike the brief demos I usually hear at shows, this audition was held in a dedicated, quiet room. Crucially, I had full control over the demo, including the volume. The experience left me more enthused about the potential of WiSA (Wireless Speaker and Audio Association) than ever.


I took a trip to Klipsch HQ in Indianapolis.
This image reminds me of Bioshock!

Interesting if they are planning on Atmos. Could be a game changer for those who wish to add Atmos without cutting into their walls.
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post #9 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 06:32 PM - Thread Starter
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This image reminds me of Bioshock!

Interesting if they are planning on Atmos. Could be a game changer for those who wish to add Atmos without cutting into their walls.
No idea if that's the case, just hopeful/wishful thinking.

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post #10 of 46 Old 12-31-2015, 07:26 PM
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This image reminds me of Bioshock!

Interesting if they are planning on Atmos. Could be a game changer for those who wish to add Atmos without cutting into their walls.
You'd still need to plug them in but I agree with you.
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You'd still need to plug them in but I agree with you.

Upward firing modules like the KL-RP140SA's... but powered... or built in like the KL-RP280FA's would do it.

Again, the biggest question to come up would be room correction.
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You'd still need to plug them in but I agree with you.
This is true. Alright, strike my comment from the record. Not too many of us with random receptacles in the ceiling. Perhaps a power bar and ridiculous use of extension cords?
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What's up with Klipsch and its use of smaller drivers?
Heresy > KLF-C7 > RC62 > RP450C > RP-440WC
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post #14 of 46 Old 01-01-2016, 08:11 AM - Thread Starter
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This is true. Alright, strike my comment from the record. Not too many of us with random receptacles in the ceiling. Perhaps a power bar and ridiculous use of extension cords?
Self-powered wireless towers with built-in Atmos up-firing capability is the clear and obvious way for a system like this to offer both immersive sound the easiest installation. I'm just speculating for fun, but that's the direction I think systems like this will go.

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post #15 of 46 Old 01-01-2016, 09:42 AM
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I don't get why WiSA is pushing integrated systems. The killer app for this technology is amps for wireless surrounds. They can be fairly expensive - after all, the competition is an installer's labor for demolition/installation, not just wires and amps - and they would make multichannel installations feasible in any number of homes both owned and rented.

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"it is a powerful surround system that delivers a true home-theater experience to the listener"

Shouldn't that be a given? Good job, Klipsch, you made true home theater speakers. But since it takes more to impress me, I'll shop elsewhere.
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Those will be the first words out of my mouth when I visit the Klipsch booth at CES next week.
I looked into the Wisa 1.0 specs a while back, the max # of channels it supports is 8. However there's no reason you couldn't have 2 or more simultaneously Wisa signals going on at once, continuously flipping around looking for the best frequency to latch onto. In theory the system should be resilient to other signals using those bands, including other Wisa systems.

It would be definitely cool to have a receiver that 2 x 8 channels of Wisa outputs. The second such an AVR becomes available and Wisa plug-in single-channel receivers / DACs come out, then I'm all set for a 9-16 channel extensible / flexible Atmos system. That said, Wisa offers even more placement flexibility, at least for floor speakers (everyone's room layout is different) so speaker position placement calibration becomes even more important. In a sense, it's a good thing for Wisa and Atmos / DTS:X to work together, it would be a marriage made in heaven. But AVRs and speaker manufacturers, or HTIB makers have a vested interest in maintaining a closed ecosystem. Hence you see stuff like Yahama's Bluetooth AVRs, when Bluetooth is pretty bad for lag and real-time characteristics. You can compensate for lag with movies or TV shows but not videogames, which is another reason Wisa is a huge win.

Then again, since Wisa doesn't solve the power problem to speakers, especially for height speakers, you've only managed to replace speaker wires with power wires (for self-powered speakers). It would definitely allow for more AMPs to be used, and possibly lower costs for lower end AVRs which have been removing pre-outs like nobody's business in the past few years, much to the chagrin of budget-conscious people. I would have jumped into Atmos / DTS:X already if some of the 500$ AVRs had full-preouts. But instead they force people to spend double for such a low-tech, low-end feature which is just a bypass to the amp section. Such a shame. Hopefully Wisa breaks that down. Ironically, once Wisa becomes prevalent (here's to hoping that happens) in AVRs, then we could possibly see full pre-outs coming out on lower end AVRs again, since it would be an easy way for one company to add a value-added convenience feature which otherwise people would simply bypass and use a Wisa receiver to plug in an external amp for those channels instead. Or even use powered pro-speakers, like I use.

Wisa is really 50% of the standard that it needs to be. It should have an optional power transmission component. So ear-height level speakers can be plugged into wall sockets, but higher up speakers or like rear surrounds can just sit there and soak in power from the room to keep playing. There typically is much less low-end information (even none) being sent to those speakers anyway, due to size constraints, so one could see how even very minimal amounts of wireless power could keep those channels humming along nicely, without any wires at all.

Also, I really wish Klipsch would stop using those brass-colored woofers, I find them ugly as heck. Speakers should be as black / dark as possible for home theater, and not have drivers that draw attention to themselves. I suspect even with the grills on if you put some of these speakers behind an AT screen you would still get some reflections.
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post #18 of 46 Old 01-03-2016, 01:25 AM
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This is my first post on the forum, however, i have been a long time reader of this forum and several others for audio. I am a huge Klipsch fan, i only have 2 RP-260f and a RP-250C, but i plan on upgrading to the top end of the Reference Premiere line (RP-280F and RP-450C). It seems that Klipsch is just trying to be the first in the game to provide wireless speakers at an affordable price. In doing so, they are reaching out to a different market of people who wish to have an awesome home theater, but cannot due to WAF or other limitations (Children, pets, lack of space).

However, i do in part think wireless will catch on further down the road, i don't feel that it will be extremely successful at this time. This doesn't mean Klipsch won't do well, but unless they change their current setup, it will be difficult.

Pros

No wires

Speakers will have own power supply, should be able to unleash full power on each speaker. No more expensive amps to get your full money's worth for performance.

Cons

Expensive (Over $5,000 for a full 5.1 setup)

No upgrade ability, or the ability to use previous Klipsch models.


To me, the speakers having their own power supply is negated by cost, as it makes more sense to just buy a solid AVR receiver, with full ability to use speakers you already own, or plan to upgrade.

That just leaves no wires vs no ability to upgrade (For now at least), which seems like an easy decision. It won't be a system for everyone, especially from the beginning since it is new technology. When the price lowers and other companies start to work on a similar design, it will catch on, but some companies will have a reason to stay away, since they have a market share in the AVR business. For now, the market will decide how audio goes forward, if people gravitate to the wireless angle, other companies will move forward as well.

I could not justify spending over $5,000 for a 5.1 system that cannot be upgraded. For that price, you could get 4 RP-280F speakers ($2400), 1 RP-450C speaker ($500), 2 R-12SW ($700), and have $1500 to put towards a AVR receiver. You would be getting a much more bang for your buck, with the only drawback of having wires. 4 RP-280F can actually cost around $1600, R-12SW was $350 when i bought mine. Pricing varies, i am lucky enough to live 15 minutes from Nebraska Furniture Mart, who usually has the RP-280F for $399.99, R-12SW for $350, and the Rp-450C for around $500. Unfortunately, unless you live near one, prices are much higher on their website. I remember spending 2 hours trying to pay $350 for that R-12SW, which listed for $450 on their website, only to find out that it was $350 in the store.
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post #19 of 46 Old 01-03-2016, 07:12 AM
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They will sell a ton of these things. Likely not to people on this forum though. They will sell to people with money, who don't want to see wires. The true technology and home theater enthusiasts will continue to have everything hard wired, as no wireless system will ever be as good as hard-wiring, whether it's for speakers, Ethernet, additional TV boxes, whatever.
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I completely agree, i am sure it will do well with people who have the money for the setup, it is also much easier for people who don't know anything about audio. Like i said, i like the switch to each speaker having it's own power supply, but that benefit is lost due to price.

I would love to have the two front speakers, with the center channel, in wireless form, since they take up the bulk of the power. However, the two do not work together. Anyone who loves Klipsch won't want the new system, since the speakers are so efficient that nearly any audio receiver will do.

One question i do have about the new towers is having 2 4.5 inch woofers that handle the bass better than 1 8 inch woofer? The 2 4.5 inch woofers would have a 1 inch woofer advantage, but wouldn't that result in an inability to hit the lower frequencies? So why is Klipsch replacing a 8 inch woofer with 2 4.5 woofers? Would it sound better? Maybe since it has less power restrictions, now it is possible to use 2 4.5 woofers instead?
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post #21 of 46 Old 01-04-2016, 02:25 AM
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They will sell a ton of these things. Likely not to people on this forum though. They will sell to people with money, who don't want to see wires. The true technology and home theater enthusiasts will continue to have everything hard wired, as no wireless system will ever be as good as hard-wiring, whether it's for speakers, Ethernet, additional TV boxes, whatever.
Eh, not always. Running speaker wire over 50 feet can cause high frequency loss. Running too thin gauge wire over a long run wastes power and loses signal. Running unbalanced audio cables long distances or past florescent lights and electrical can degrade the signal. An end user can't always conceal wiring that well in a rental, or with a brick outer wall for that matter. An RCA balun can solve the low level signal transportation issues, but that's another piece of equipment, and if running pre outs (to avoid excess speaker wire length) this way, you still need either powered speakers or an amp at the end of the line. Now in general I also prefer wired solutions, but there are lots of reasons even a hardcore HT enthusiast might prefer a wireless solution. These cost a lot, especially including the wireless receiver that replaces and offers less functionality than most AVRS aside from wireless, and they cannot easily integrate legacy equipment, and I think that's the main downfalls right now.

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post #22 of 46 Old 01-04-2016, 02:45 AM
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This image reminds me of Bioshock!

Interesting if they are planning on Atmos. Could be a game changer for those who wish to add Atmos without cutting into their walls.
Yeah, very Bioshock-esque

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post #23 of 46 Old 01-04-2016, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Travisallen507 View Post
One question i do have about the new towers is having 2 4.5 inch woofers that handle the bass better than 1 8 inch woofer? The 2 4.5 inch woofers would have a 1 inch woofer advantage, but wouldn't that result in an inability to hit the lower frequencies? So why is Klipsch replacing a 8 inch woofer with 2 4.5 woofers? Would it sound better? Maybe since it has less power restrictions, now it is possible to use 2 4.5 woofers instead?
The surface area of an 8" woofer is higher than 2 4.5" woofers. So the opposite is in fact true. However, I'm confident this is a 2.5way design in that all 4 4.5" woofers will be producing bass, unlike a 3 way design. In that case, there is more output potential than a single 8". At this price there are plenty of dual 8" designs that will output more than 4 4.5" woofers though.
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post #24 of 46 Old 01-04-2016, 02:29 PM
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I completely agree, i am sure it will do well with people who have the money for the setup, it is also much easier for people who don't know anything about audio. Like i said, i like the switch to each speaker having it's own power supply, but that benefit is lost due to price.
I wouldn't say it's for people who know nothing about audio. It's for people who know enough to know that you need good surround sound to get a good experience, but who aren't technology purists like us. And realistically, they very well could outperform a typical surround sound setup with an underpowered AVR that can't deliver full power to every channel at once or has wiring that's too thin/old/whatever, and in high-end condos and apartments in the city that have wire-phobic residents, this will certainly blow the best soundbar out of the water. This isn't really for the enthusiast who's got a rack of Emotiva's hooked up to a Pre/Pro running with 12 gauge speaker wire to their Dolby Atmos setup.

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Eh, not always. Running speaker wire over 50 feet can cause high frequency loss. Running too thin gauge wire over a long run wastes power and loses signal. Running unbalanced audio cables long distances or past florescent lights and electrical can degrade the signal. An end user can't always conceal wiring that well in a rental, or with a brick outer wall for that matter.
That's all true. These will outperform poorly set up wired systems. However, wiring can be done right. I have had my 7.1 channel setup in two rentals, and both times, I just ran the wires around the baseboard in a neat bundle, and ran them under a doormat anywhere they went in front of a door. It worked fine. But these certainly are a big step up for the wire phobic.
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post #25 of 46 Old 01-11-2016, 07:51 AM
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You can buy 3rd party wisa receivers to integrate legacy/wired speakers or a 3rd party transmitter to connect a/v receivers. I'm using a Beolab Transmitter 1 to connect the pre-outs of my receiver(a Marantz) to the wireless / wisa active speakers. The suboofer is wired so I had to buy a beolab receiver 1 to make it wireless. Beolab components are not cheap but I can only assume that the prices will go down once wisa goes mainstream.
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post #26 of 46 Old 01-15-2016, 12:35 AM
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Long time lurker, first time poster. I've been interested in the idea of WiSA for a long time - excited to see real products starting to trickle out.

I was looking at some CES-related press releases last week and noticed that Axiim (some new Kirkland, WA outfit) appears to be selling a complete 5.1 WiSA home theater kit (complete with a fairly competent looking 6 HDMI input, CEC-capable AVR) for $1500. As far as I can tell, they're actually shipping now (albeit with a "beta" tag - looks like they're waiting on final Dolby certification):

<I'd post a full link here, but I'm a n00b with a low post count. You can find it easily enough on axiim.com.>

Anybody have any experience with Axiim or know of anything comparable in this price range? I'm considering pulling the trigger.

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The suboofer is wired so I had to buy a beolab receiver 1 to make it wireless.
Interesting...I wonder if I could use two of those to retrofit some existing in-ceiling rear channel speakers into an Axiim setup for 7.1. Seems like it ought to work, although I'd need to figure out how to convert the BeoLab Powerlink connection to a standard speaker terminal...
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post #27 of 46 Old 02-10-2016, 07:23 AM
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Interesting points all.

I am in the process of considering this type of system, perhaps 1-2 pieces to start, to replace a 20-30 year old HT system for a basic living room. I've considered alternatives, but ultimately I still think I want a L/C/R & sub system at a minimum

I'm not concerned with not re-using any of the current system - which perhaps makes a difference.

The ability to move the speakers, restrictions being outlets, is interesting. I understand this is not a 'multi-room' wireless system, but the ability to move the monitors might work in a pinch (party ).

Anyhow I'm currently torturing myself over the appeal of smaller hub , and somewhat cleaner look of a Wisa system.
I am primarily interested in starting with a Hub/Center and as quickly as I can - subwoofer.

I'll be very interested to hear the reviews - of course considering the cost difference with some low/mid end solutions.

Given that I had a very modest previous system I may not end up springing the $$ for this stuff.

As points of reference,my Old (very old) system had s two paradigm monitor towers (7se), and Cambridge Soundworks C/Sub/Rears + Sony 5.1 receiver - which needed to be replaced anyway, since the receiver was acting up and center is showing it's age

I've debated as I said , soundbars (paradigm) , some sort of 'closed' wireless system (sonos/denon/bose), and just buying new components a few at a time (paradigm L/R/C, existing sub with a new 'consumer' receiver (denon/yamaha/nad).

Ascthetics are a part of this decision however

Still waiting to hear / see this system ...someplace....
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post #28 of 46 Old 02-11-2016, 12:35 AM
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I'll be very interested to hear the reviews
I ended up going for the Axiim system. At $1500 for a complete 5.1 system including receiver (at least while the "introductory beta price" lasts), it felt like a pretty reasonable value prop to me.

I started an owners' thread that's got some detailed impressions if you're interested, but long story short is that I've been totally satisfied so far.
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post #29 of 46 Old 02-14-2016, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by WebEffect View Post
Shouldn't that be a given? Good job, Klipsch, you made true home theater speakers. But since it takes more to impress me, I'll shop elsewhere.

LMAO....spoken like a true Bose aficionado...go play some more MK on Wii .


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post #30 of 46 Old 05-07-2017, 11:34 AM
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Reviving this thread... The price of the 5.1 system from Klipsch is now $3,194. The only downside that I've seen so far is that there can be interference from a 5G Wi-Fi access point (router), but I think I can manage that.

To anyone who has one of these systems: is there any way to balance the various speakers for room acoustics and speaker-listener spatial relations?
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